Modules - Department of Mechanical Engineering

1st Semester

MATHEMATICS I

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Face-to-face 
Weekly Hours: Lectures, 5 (3+2) 
ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

To acquire the students of department of mechanical engineering the essential knowledge of Mathematics.

The course provides an introduction to the mathematical analysis and linear algebra. The course starts with the real numbers and the related one-variable real functions by studying limits, and continuity. Then it approaches the core of calculus, differential and integral theory for one-variable real functions. The aspects of linear algebra are also included in the course: in particular by studying the linear spaces and the theory and calculus of matrices.

Module Description

The core modules of the course include:

  • Matrics.
  • Properties of determinants.
  • Eigenvalues and eigenvectors.
  • Complex numbers - Properties of complex numbers - Complex number measure
  • Calculus Introduction.
  • Points, Vectors, and Functions.
  • Functions, Graphs, and Limits.
  • Continuity of Functions.
  • Derivatives.
  • Computing Derivatives.
  • Second Derivatives and Beyond.
  • Indefinite Integrals.
  • Definite Integrals.
  • The Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.
  • Area, Volume, and Arc Length.
  • Sequences.
  • Series.

 

 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final written examination: 70%.

 

Interim examination (advance): 20%.

 

Team/Personal biannual work (optional): 10%.

Recommended or required Bibliography

  • Κατωπόδης, Ε., Μακρυγιάννης, Α., Σάσσαλος, Σ. (1994). Μαθηματικά Ι. Σύγχρονη Εκδοτική, Αθήνα.
  • Αναστασάτος, Δ., Δημητρακούδης, Δ., Κουρής, Ν., Λαμπίρης, Μ., Παλαμούρδας, Δ., Αναστασίου, Κ., Ντούρος, Γ. (1996). Μαθηματικά Ι. Εκδόσεις Κωστάκη, Αθήνα.
  • Strang, G. (1996). Γραμμική Άλγεβρα και Εφαρμογές. Πανεπιστημιακές Εκδόσεις Κρήτης.
  • Chirgwin B.H., Plumpton C. (1970). A course of Mathematics for Engineers and Scientists, Volume 1 of 6, 2nd Edition, Pergamon Press.
  • Edward G. Henry, Penney D.E. (1998). Calculus with Analytic Geometry early transcendentals, Prentice Hall. 

PHYSICS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Face to Face 
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 2

Practical Problems solving, 1

Laboratory, 2

ECTS: 5.5 
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, students will be able :

 

1. To  understand the physics principles and laws which required for the courses of the following semesters. 

2.To use the “physics thinking” for giving solutions in technology applications. 

3.To have the necessary knowledge of the laws of physics governing the applications of mechanical engineering. 

Module Description

Physical quantities and measurements. Dimensional Analysis. General view of the basic physical quantities (Force, Torque, Pressure, Work, Power, Momentum, Angular Momentum). Basic principles and Laws (Newton’s Law, Principles of Conservation of Energy, Momentum & Angular momentum- applications). Motion of a point and motion of a solid (linear motion, rotation, rolling and the importance of frinction). Elasticity (Hooks Law), Harmonic Oscillator, Calorimetry, Electrostatics, Magnetostatics, Basic Electrodynamics (motion of a charge, Amperes law, Biot-Savart law, induction, electromagnetic waves).  

 

Laboratory: The first 3 basic theoretical exercises ( measurement errors, graphs, basic measurements). Followed by 10 exercises (viscosity, harmonic oscillation, linear acceleration, sound phenomena, calorimetry, lenses, Conservation of Energy.. Each laboratory exercise is presented by the student with an essay-report with the measurements taken, calculation of the quantities, corresponding graphs and calculation of measurement errors.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Ι. Optional midterm written exam (50%)  containing 

-Multiple Choice 

-Questions of short answer 

-Problems 

 

II. Written final exam (50% or 100%) 

containing 

-Multiple Choice 

-Questions of short answer 

-Problems

 

Final grade:  Theory 60% - Laboratory 40%

Recommended or required Bibliography

•Physics of Motion and the Resting, G. Nicolaides-A. Skountzos, by “Contemporary Publications”, EUDOXUS : 12713021 (in Greek)

•Physics, Halliday David, Resnick Robert, Walker Jearl –( Papanicolas Konstantinos) EUDOXUS  [12582464] (in Greek)

•Notes

CHEMICAL TECHNOLOGY

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Face-to-face 
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 2

Laboratory Exercises, 2

ECTS: 4.5
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

 

1.Identify the basic chemical reaction engineering interest and to carry out calculations.

2.Perform basic physicochemical measurements.

3.Understand the basic physical and chemical processes and production technologies related to their specialty. So they will be able to better understand the operation of the equipment

4.Have the ability to select the appropriate materials and production methods.

Module Description

Theory: Solutions, chemical reactions, stoichiometry of chemical reactions, combustion reactions (incomplete combustion, complete with air excess), exhaust gases, chemical reaction rate, chemical balance, pH. Water chemistry, physicochemical size measurements. Desalination by reverse osmosis. Εlectrolysis, electroplating, corrosion and protection of materials. Basic principles of analysis of physical and chemical processes, mass and energy balances, process flow diagrams. Production technologies, examples of production methods related to the specialty of Mechanical Engineering.

 

Laboratory: Laboratory practice and statistical processing of measuring in the topics of the theory.

 

 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Theory  60%: Written examination

Laboratory  40%: laboratory reports, Written and Oral examinations

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.   Fountoukidis E. (2009). "Laboratory Exercises in Chemical and Environmental Technology". Poukamissas publications, Athens (in Greek)

2.  Sdoukou A., Pomoni F. (2010). "Inorganic Chemical Technology". Tziolas publications, Thessaloniki

      (in Greek)

3.  Papastefanou S., Lalia M. (2012). "General and Inorganic Chemistry". Ziti publications, Thessaloniki (in Greek) 

4.  Smith J. M. (1999) «Chemical Process Engineering". Tziolas publications, Thessaloniki (in Greek)

5.  Manassis Mitrakas (2001) "Qualitative characteristics and water treatment, Tziolas publications,

     Thessaloniki  (in Greek)

6.  Savakis K. (2003) "Chemical Technology". Ziti publications, Thessaloniki (in Greek)

7.  Zoumpoulis D., Zoumpoulis A., Matis K., Mavros P. (2009). "Introduction in Chemical Technology".  

     Tziolas publications, Thessaloniki (in Greek)

8.  Karagiannidis P. (2008). "Inorganic Chemistry". Ziti publications, Thessaloniki (in Greek) 

STRUCTURED COMPUTER PROGRAMMING

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Face to Face 
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 2

Laboratory, 2 

ECTS: 4.5 
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The course is an introduction to the concepts of computer programming. The programming structures and techniques are demonstrated with C# language in a modern programming environment such as Visual Studio .NET. The C # is a friendly programming language for the development of computer programs which can be executed both on a computer and  in a distributed environment or on a handheld device. Upon successful completion of the course, the student will be able to:

 

  • Handle the Integrated Development Environment
  • Create a graphical user interface 
  • Distinguish the information to be encoded within a problem and choose the appropriate data types
  • Formulate ways to solve simple algorithmic problems
  • Use the tools and functions of the programming language
  • Use the debugging tools to locate and fix errors in the code 
  • Work alone or with fellow students or engineers in development of applications  

Module Description

The main purpose of the course is learning of  basic programming structures for the development of computer programs. Also, the familiarity in using modern software application development tools. Then follows a list of the topics covered in the course:

 

Theory

1. Introduction to Programming and Computer Science, The development environment applications

2. Basic data types for representing information

3. Local and global variables, operators and expressions,

4. Control of the program's flow 

5. Create complex conditions with logical operators

6. The commands for creating loops 

7. Creation and use of functions and procedures

8. Calling a function by value and by reference

9. Create and crossing one and multi- dimensional tables

10. Methods of sorting  and searching  a table

11. Dynamic memory allocation and complex data structures to store values in ram

12. Create a file, reading and storing values a file

13. Introduction to object-oriented programming and classes

 

Workshops

1. Familiarity with the interface, the development of a windows-application 

2. Demonstration of basic data types

3. Development of application for arithmetic operations and solving equations

4. Software application with control structures 

5. Using logical operators to create complex conditions

6. Using the repeat structures

7. Software application with functions and procedures

8. Software application with demonstration of function call by value and by reference

9. Using tables to store values

10. Sorting and searching a table

11. Dynamic memory allocation

12. Reading and storing values in a file

13. Creating objects with properties and methods

 

 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final Exam (60%)

Lab Exams (40%)

 

 

The above assignments  include:

 

 

a) Application Development GUI

b) Construction of function and/or procedure

c) Detection of errors in code.

Recommended or required Bibliography

  • Microsoft Visual C#, Step by Step, John Sharp, Microsoft Press (translated in greek - Microsoft Visual C# 2008 Βήμα Βήμα, John Sharp, Εκδόσεις ΚΛΕΙΔΑΡΙΘΜΟΣ 2008, Αθήνα)
  • The Complete Reference C# 3.0,  Schildt Herbert, McGraw-Hill Companies, 2009 (translated in greek - Οδηγός της C# 3.0, Schildt Herbert, Εκδόσεις ΓΚΙΟΥΡΔΑΣ 2009, Αθήνα) 
  • MSDN Magazine, https://msdn.microsoft.com/magazine/mt632264
  • Journal of Computing and Information Science in Engineering, http://computingengineering.asmedigitalcollection.asme.org/journal.aspx 

MECHANICAL DRAWING

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures, Laboratory, Physical presence in class 
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 1

Laboratory exercises, 3 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

 Mechanical Drawing is a key course, necessary for every engineer to shape up a technical way of thinking, and a basic background course that enables students to understand and solve problems in the majority of other curriculum courses (e.g. Mechanical Engineering Lab, AutoCAD, Autodesk Inventor, etc.), as well as in their future work as Engineers.

It is by means of the Mechanical Drawing that the constructive ideas of the Engineer-Designer are put into paper in order to define the actual shape and configuration of a component or mechanism with both clarity and detail, in a demonstrative manner that requiring no further description and explanation. In fact, Mechanical Drawing is considered to be the means of communication between the designer and the manufacturer.

Thus, since comprising an international technical language, Mechanical Drawing comes with a certain set of rules.

To this end, this course aims at the acquisition of knowledge and the implementation of the Mechanical Drawing rules, relating to the presentation and drawing of a component, the threading design rules (screw incisions, screw connections), standardization of components (DIN, ISO, ANSI , ELOT, etc.), the ability to configure and process materials (surface quality and machining symbols, tolerances - splices, weld symbols), dimensioning rules (dimensions scripture depending on the content and plan type), the purpose of mechanical drawings (construction plans, assembling plans, supervisory and machining plans, etc.) and their content (general layout, components group presentation, presentation of a semi-finished component, schematic layout representation etc. ).

Therefore, Mechanical Drawing, being primarily a lab lesson, is firstly comprehended through the making of actual drawings, and secondarily through reading. Upon its successful completion, the students will be able to:

•Know the Mechanical Drawing rules and to acquire perception in technical thinking;

•Understand the technical specifics of design, governed by the content of the plans;

•Apply the Mechanical Drawing rules with easiness, which will allow them to convert their thoughts into plans and make the necessary corrections and adjustments;

•Evaluate any type of mechanical drawing and estimate the construction cost so that it can be maintained at a competitive level;

•Analyze the technical specifics of a component in a design plan and differentiate it due to equipment exchangeability;

•Compose components, designing them for the completion of a project or the construction of a mechanism;

Module Description

i.Introduction-General Instructions (Line types, letters- numbers writing, understanding of the Mechanical Drawing rules and their purpose, as           well as the perfection and clarity it should be designed with)

ii.Drawing facets ( Auxiliary views, Semi-facets)

iii.Incisions Design (Complete Incisions, full Incisions at several levels, semi-Incisions, Some Incisions)

iv.Dimensions rules scripture (Positioning dimensions depending on the content and purpose of the plan)

v.Threading design rules (screw incisions, screw connections)

vi.Intersections and developments of various solids

vii.Reading Plan (without perspective object)

viii.Construction plans (assembling plans, supervisory and machining plans, etc.)

ix.Numbering Plans & Parts-components catalog (numbering and classification plans)

x.Assembled Plans (general layout of components etc.)

xi.Tolerances - Connectors (tolerance position depending on the nominal size or diameter, tolerances System ISO, the tolerance unit (i), tolerance classes and connectors, foramen basic system and basic axis)

xii.Welding (Design welded parts-components, weld symbols) 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Language of assessment: Greek and English (for Erasmus students).

I.Exercise delivery during the semester (30%), which includes drawing of components or mechanisms plans associated with the theory taught on a weekly basis in class. (Exercises are returned after being corrected and graded).

II.Midterm Examination (30%), consists of drawing components or mechanisms plans in relation to the theory taught so far. (Grade announcement).

III.Final examination (40%), which includes drawing of components or mechanisms plans in relation to the theory taught during the semester. (Grade announcement). 

Recommended or required Bibliography

Greek Bibliography:

  • Meletios D. Voulgaris, 2004. MECHANICAL DRAWING. Edition October 2009 Athens: Modern Publishing Ltd.
  • Giorgos Politis, 2005. MECHANICAL DRAWING I. Edition 2006. Athens: Emmanouilidis publications
  • St. A. Mavrommatis, 2001. MECHANICAL DRAWING and descriptive geometry. Edition B. Athens: Published by the author.
  • V. Papamitoukas, 1971. MECHANICAL DRAWING. Edition 2009. Thessaloniki: UNIVERSITY STUDIO PRESS. 

MECHANICS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures, laboratories, distance learning methods. 
Weekly Hours: Lectures, 5 
ECTS: 5.5 
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:

1.They have acquired the knowledge and the understanding of issues related to statics and kinematics of rigid bodies

2.Be able to use all the scientific knowledge in order to understand and solve static problems

3.To have the ability to analyze the problems of mechanisms and resolve them

Module Description

1. Statics of Particles

2. Rigid Bodies: Equivalent Systems of Forces

3. Equilibrium of Rigid Bodies

4.. Distributed Forces: Centroids and Centers of Gravity

5. Analysis of Structures

6. Distributed Forces: Moments of Inertia of Areas

7. N,Q,M Diagrammes

8. Distributed Forces: Centroids and Centers of Gravity

6. Analysis of Structures

7. Forces in Beams and Cables

8. Friction

9. Distributed Forces: Moments of Inertia

10. Kinimatic equations of rigid body.

11. Mechanisms’ problems

12. Mechanisms and Simple Machines

13. Basic Kinematics of Constrained Rigid Bodies

14. Degrees of Freedom of a Rigid Body

15. Planar and Spatial Mechanisms

16. Kinematics and Dynamics of Mechanisms

17. Links, Frames and Kinematic Chains

18. Skeleton Outline

19. Pairs, Higher Pairs, Lower Pairs and Linkages

20 Kinematic Analysis and Synthesis 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination: 100%

Optional job preparation and presentation of up to 20%, less than the proportion of written examination 

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Μηχανική του απαραμόρφωτου στερεού, Στατική, Βουθούνης, Παναγιώτης Α. , εκδ ιδίου

2.Στατική: Μηχανική του στερεού σώματος, ασκήσεις Ι,  Εμμανουήλ Ε. Γδούτος, Χρ. Ν. Κάλφας,  εκδ. Συμμετρία

3.Στατική των ισοστατικών φορέων Διαγράμματα [N], [Q], [M]: Γραμμές επιρροής: Αρχή δυνατών έργων, Γιάννης Β. Γκαρούτσος, εκδ. SPIN

4.Τεχνική μηχανική Μηχανική Ι: Στατική των στερεών και ειδικά κεφάλαια, Νικόλαος Αραποστάθης,Δημήτριος Αραποστάθης, εκδ. Ίων

5.Στατική Τεχνική μηχανική,Ferdinand P. Beer, Russell E. Johnston, Elliot R. Eisenberg, εκδ. Τζιόλα

6.Εφαρμοσμένη στατική, Walter Wagner, Gerhard Erlhof, εκδ. Κλειδάριθμος

7.Στατική, Εμμανουήλ Ε. Γδούτος, εκδ. Συμμετρία

8.Μηχανική του απόλυτου στερεού, Κινηματική και δυναμική, εκδ. Συμμετρία

9.Theory of Elasticity, Stephen Timoshenko, Mcgraw-Hill College 

10.Theory of Elastic Stability, Stephen P. Timoshenko, James M. Gere, Dover Publications

11.Engineering Mechanics: Statics (13th Edition), Russell C. Hibbeler, Prentice Hall 2012

12.Engineering Mechanics: Statics [J. L. Meriam, L. G. Kraige,  Wiley 2011

13.Schaum's Outline of Statics and Strength of Materials (Schaum's),  John Jackson , Harold Wirtz, McGraw-Hill 1983. 

2nd Semester

MATHEMATICS II

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures, face-to-face 
Weekly Hours: Lectures, 5 
ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

MATHEMATICS II aims to enrich students’ abilities in the use of functions of many variables and their integrals, as well to recognize, classify and solve differential equations thus gaining a solid background for their endeavors in their discipline.

Module Description

 

- MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS II

 

The Euclidean space  . Functions between Euclidean spaces, limit and continuity of functions. Differentiation of vector-valued functions of a single variable, applications in mechanics and differential geometry, polar, cylindrical and spherical coordinates. Differentiable functions, partial and directional derivative, the concept of differential. Vector fields, gradient-divergence-curl. Fundamental theorems of differentiable functions (mean value theorem, Taylor). Inverse function theorem. Implicit function theorems. Functional dependence. Local and conditional extremes. Double and triple integrals: definitions, integrability criteria, properties. Change of variables, applications. Contour integrals: Contour integral of the first and second kind, contour integrals independent of path, Green’s Theorem.

 

- DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS

 

Introduction to differential equations (definitions). First order differential equations (separable variables, total differential and Euler multiplier, linear, Bernoulli, homogeneous Riccati). Qualitative theory of differential equations (general). Higher order linear differential equations (general theory). Linear differential with constant coefficients (solution of linear equations, variation of parameter method, method of undetermined coefficient’s, Euler’s differential equations, applications). 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final Written Examination: 100% 

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.“Differential Equations”,  Y.  Georgoudis, A. Paliatsos, N. Prezerakos. Publications: “Sunhroni Ekdotiki”, Eudoxos code 6836.

2.“Differential Equations” Anastasatos, Theodorou, Kouris, Ndrigogias. Publications: ’’Diros publications”, Eudoxos code 47299.

3.“Functions of many variables”, Y. Georgoudis, A. Makrugiannis, S. Sassalos. Publications: “Synhroni Ekdotiki” Eudoxos code 6833.

COMPUTER AIDED MECHANICAL DESIGN (CAD)

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Face to Face 
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 1 

Labs, 4

ECTS:  4.5
Web Page:  
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The course provides the student with a theoretical background on the structure of modern Computer Aided Design Systems. He gets familiar on suitably applying all necessary CAD-tools in order to design mechanical components and assemblies by getting a deeper knowledge on the Mechanical Drawing rules, as well as on the interaction with Computer Aided Engineering, Computer Aided Manufacturing, Additive Manufacturing, Reverse Engineering areas.

On completion of the course students will have

•In-depth knowledge and critical understanding of the theory and principles on the use of modern CAD technologies in the design of products

•Knowledge and skills on CAD modeling techniques in order to produce technical drawings

•Knowledge and skills to recognize any state of the art CAD technology and evaluate strategies for the product to be designed

•knowledge of Synthesis of mechanical parts to produce technical assemblies

•Knowledge and skills to analyze the needs of related technologies as CAE, CAM, 3D printing to optimize the CAD model creation.

Module Description

Theoretical part:

Basic functions of a CAD-System. 2-Dimensional Computer Aided Design. 3-Dimensional CAD methodology. Features. Parametric design. Boolean operations. Wireframe modelers. Surface modelers. Solid modelers. CSG/B-REP/Hybrid systems. Direct modelers. Parts design. Assembly design. Creating and modifying techniques. Technical drawings. Collaboration with other product development technologies (CAM, CAE, Reverse Engineering, Additive manufacturing). Case studies.

 

CAD Laboratory:

2D Design:

1.Drawing norms

2.Machine elements in mechanical design

3.Introduction to 2D CAD

4.Basic functions of CAD Systems

5.Simple geometric elements composition to create views and section views

6.Design and modification tools 

7.Dimensioning, numbering and Bill of materials

8.Create drawings based on norms

9.Examples and applications from industry

 

3D Design:

1.Introduction to 3D design

2.3D modeling Methodology 

3.Tools analysis of modern 3D CAD modelers

4.Features for generating solid parts / Boolean operations

5.Features for shape modification

6.Modeling mechanical parts and components

7.Create assemblies

8.Usage of CAD systems in collaboration with other product development technologies (CAM, CAE, Reverse Engineering, Additive                             manufacturing).

9.Examples and applications from industry 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final Exam (60%)

Lab Exams (40%) including the design of parts and mechanisms in correlation with taught case studies. The Lab exam consists of 2 parts, 2D and 3D modeling.

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.BILALIS N., MARAVELAKIS M.: CAD/CAM SYSYETMS & 3D MODELING, KRITIKI PUBLICATIONS, 2014. (in Greek)

2.KUNWOO LEE: PRINCIPLES OF CAD/CAM/CAE. KLIDARITHMOS PUBLICATIONS 2009 (in Greek)

3.KUANG-HUA CHANG: PRODUCT DESIGN MODELING USING CAD/CAE. ACADEMIC PRESS, 2014

4.FAUX, I.D.: COMPUTATIONAL GEOMETRY FOR DESIGN AND MANUFACTURE, 1980. ELLIS HORWOOD LTD.

-Related Journals:

COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN – ELSEVIER SCI LRD

COMPUTER AIDED GEOMETRIC DESIGN – ELSEVIER 

MACHINING TECHNOLOGY

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 1

Laboratory Work, 4 

ECTS: 4.5 
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

 

When the module has been completed, students will be able to: 

•recognize the casting methods of the materials, their applications and their abilities, how a mould/cast is made and the parts it consists of               and how the proper casting method is selected that has to be used in each case.

•be familiar with the presses, their types and their applications in mechanical forming.

•be familiar with the types of forging and their applications, how rolling is made and its types as well as the problems arising during this                   process.

•be familiar with how extrusion is made, its applications and the problems arising during this process.

•be familiar with how blank shearing is made, what the stages are through which it develops and the application point of the blank shearing             force.

•acquire knowledge on what is and how deep drawing is made and to specify the required sheet for the forming of an item through deep                 drawing.

•acquire knowledge on the types of sheet bending/folding and the machine tools  that do this.

•acquire knowledge on what is and how spinning is made and the special forming methods, such as threading, stamping, traction, pipe                     formation, cutting and  high  rate energy ones.

•combine the forming methods for plastic.

       be familiar with the general and specific security rules for the forming process. 

Module Description

•Casting.

•Forming machine tools: forges and presses.

•Forming massive material: forging, rolling and extrusion.

•Sheet metal forming: blank shearing, drawing, and  bending. 

•Drawing and wire drawing.

•Work safety measures ΙΙ. 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

•Multiple choice questions and questions with short responses

•Oral exam Assignment  

Recommended or required Bibliography

1. Antoniades, A. (2011) "Machining Technology", Volume II,  Tziolas Publications, Athens (in greek)

2. Petropoulos, P. (1991) "Machining Technology", Volume II-1, Ziti Publications, Thessaloniki (in greek)

3. Vlachos, C. (2003). "Machining Technology", Volume I, Modern Publication, Athens (in greek)

 

Scientific papers:

 

•International Journal of Meterial Forming

•Advances in Super-plasticity and super-plastic forming

•The international Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology Welding International

•Science and Technology of Welding and Joining Powder Metallurgy 

SPECIFIC TOPICS OF PHYSICS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures, laboratories  
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 2

Laboratory, 2 

ECTS: 4.5 
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The course is an introductory course of physics applications in modern fields of engineering This course aims to deepen students' knowledge in the basic physics behind the modern applications, but also to give them the basis they need to monitor the course of subsequent semesters. 

A large part of the course material focuses on the theory underlying the interaction of radiation with matter and analyzes the working principle of methods used for the study of modern materials, which will be in the future part of the job of a graduate. The student at the end of this course knows in depth the physics behind the newer applications, both in the energy sector and construction.

He will have an overall understanding of materials characterization techniques and will be able to select and combine the proper techniques to take decisions relevant to the selection of appropriate materials.

Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to: 

• Generally recognize the contribution and application of Modern Physics in mechanical engineering 

• Be aware of special techniques and methods of materials characterization. 

• Evaluate the results of research and propose solutions 

Module Description

•LASER: basic principles and applications in mechanical engineering. 

•Semiconductors and semiconductor devices. 

•Photovoltaic Elements: The technological evolution from first to fourth generation of solar cell photovoltaics.

•Nanotechnology-Nanomechanics.

•Interaction of electromagnetic radiation and matter (X-Rays, gamma radiation etc)

•Crystallography- Diffraction

•Geometrical optics

•Materials characterization techniques ( Basic aspects of XRD, XRF, SEM, TEM, AFM etc)

 

Laboratory training of students carrying 13 laboratory exercises focused on key items of theoretical courses.  

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination: 60%

Laboratory exercise: 40% 

Recommended or required Bibliography

•Modern Physics, SERWAY R., MOSES C., MOYER C. Publisher: Crete University Press (in greek)

•Science and Technology of Metallic Materials, Chrysoulakis John, Pantelis D Publisher: Papasotiriou (in greek)

•Simserides 2016, Quantum Optics and Laser. [e-book.] (in greek)

Available at: http://hdl.handle.net/11419/2108

•Giannopapas B, 2016. Condenced matter physics problems [e-book.] (in greek)  Available at: http://hdl.handle.net/11419/1314

•Course notes 

STRENGTH OF MATERIALS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 3

Laboratory, 2 

ECTS: 5.5 
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Tension and compression of simple and compound bars. Hooke’s law, Poisson’s ratio. Compatibility equations. Equations of equilibrium. Simple indeterminate structures. Shear. Evaluation of stress and strain to members under shear forces. Plane stress (tensile and shear stresses, principal stresses and directions, Mohr’s circle of stresses, differential equilibrium equations). Plane strain (strain, rotation, principal stresses, Mohr’s circle of strains, compatibility relations). Elastic behaviour (3D state of stress, constitutive equations for isotropic materials). Properties of the strain and stress tensors. Stress-strain relations. Principal stress.  Elastic beam bending theory and introduction to plastic behaviour of bending beams. Simple bending of composite beams. Torsion. The principle of Saint-Venant. Prismatic bodies subjected to pure torsion. Buckling of elastic structures. Evaluation of critical buckling load of simple members.

Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:

1.They have acquired the knowledge and the understanding of issues related to statics and strength of rigid bodies

2.Be able to use all the scientific knowledge in order to understand strength of materials’ problems

3.To have the ability to analyze the problems of mechanisms and resolve them

Module Description

Tension and compression of simple and compound bars. Hooke’s law, Poisson’s ratio. Compatibility equations. Equations of equilibrium. Simple indeterminate structures. Shear. Evaluation of stress and strain to members under shear forces. Plane stress (tensile and shear stresses, principal stresses and directions, Mohr’s circle of stresses, differential equilibrium equations). Plane strain (strain, rotation, principal stresses, Mohr’s circle of strains, compatibility relations). Elastic behaviour (3D state of stress, constitutive equations for isotropic materials). Properties of the strain and stress tensors. Stress-strain relations. Principal stress.  Elastic beam bending theory and introduction to plastic behaviour of bending beams. Simple bending of composite beams. Torsion. The principle of Saint-Venant. Prismatic bodies subjected to pure torsion. Buckling of elastic structures. Evaluation of critical buckling load of simple members. 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination: 60%

Laboratory exercise: 40%

Optional job preparation and presentation of up to 20%, less than the proportion of written examination 

Recommended or required Bibliography

•Schaum's Outline of Strength of Materials, Fifth Edition (Schaum's Outline Series),  William A. Nash ), Merle C. Potter , McGraw-Hill; 2010

•Mechanics of Materials (8th Edition), Russell C. Hibbeler, Prentice Hall; 8 edition (April 1, 2010)

•Applied Strength of Materials (5th Edition),Robert L. Mott , Prentice Hall; 5 edition 2007

•Mechanics of Materials,Ferdinand Beer, Jr., E. Russell Johnston, John DeWolf, David Mazurek , McGraw-Hill Science/Engineering/Math; 6                 edition 2011

•Applied Statics and Strength of Materials (5th Edition),George F. Limbrunner , Leonard Spiegel P.E. Deceased , Prentice Hall; 5 edition 2008

•Schaum's Outline of Statics and Strength of Materials (Schaum's),John Jackson , Harold Wirtz , McGraw-Hill; 1 edition 1983

•History of Strength of Materials (Dover Civil and Mechanical Engineering),

•Stephen P. Timoshenko,  Dover Publications 1983

•Strength of Materials, Part 1 and Part 2, S. Timoshenko, Krieger Pub Co; 3 edition 1983

•Mechanics of Materials, Ferdinand Beer , Jr., E. Russell Johnston, John DeWolf , David Mazurek , McGraw-Hill Science/Engineering/Math; 5               edition 2008

•Αντοχή των υλικών, Ευριπίδης Παπαμίχος, Νίκος Χ. Χαραλαμπάκης, εκδ.  Τζιόλα

•Τεχνική μηχανική και αντοχή υλικών, Herr Horst, εκδ.  Ίων

•Πειραματική Αντοχή των Υλικών,θεωρία και εργαστήριο, Ι.Ν.ΠΡΑΣΙΑΝΑΚΗΣ, Σ.Κ. ΚΟΥΡΟΥΚΛΗΣ

•ΑΝΤΟΧΗ ΤΩΝ ΥΛΙΚΩΝ, Π.Βουθούνης, αυτοέκδοση

•Αντοχή των υλικών, Χαρώνης, Παναγιώτης, Σύγχρονη Εκδοτική 

ELECTRICAL & ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures, laboratories  
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 2

Laboratory, 2 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

 

Aim of the course is to familiarize students with the basic knowledge of electrical circuits and methods of resolving DC circuits and the analysis and design of basic analog electronic circuits made with discrete components.

Upon successful completion of the course, student will be able to

● It identifies and describes the key elements of an electrical circuit to combine the construction of simple electrical circuits.

● To distinguish the different configurations of sources and resistors and explain their functionality.

● To apply Kirchhoff's laws in simple and more complex circuits and to solve the basic equations that describe their function

● To apply methods for resolving linear and nonlinear circuits ( superposition method, equivalent source voltage and current, independent methods of loop currents and potentials of the nodes, graphic methods)

● Creates the equivalent Thevenin and Norton circuits and calculates the maximum power transfer to them. 

● To evaluate the circuits to solve and compare the different methodologies which can be resolved. 

Module Description

•Electric current, electric circuit, voltage, Kirchhoff laws.

•Resistors, Ohm law, Voltage and current sources. 

•Wiring resistance, open circuit and short circuit, voltage and current divider, sources assembly. 

•Methods for resolving linear and nonlinear circuits (superposition method, equivalent source voltage and current, independent methods of               loop currents and potentials of the nodes, graphic methods)

•Equivalent Thevenin and Norton circuits and calculation of the maximum power transfer to them.

•p-n junction diode (Diode with forward and reverse bias. Characteristic curve of P

•-N junction, Load line)

•Diode circuits, Κυκλώματα Διόδων, κατηγορίες διόδων

•Diode applications

•Bipolar transistor (BJT): Physical structure, Operation, Characteristic I-V curves, Load line, transistor as switch, amplifier and oscillator, bias           circuits

Laboratory training of students carrying 13 laboratory exercises focused on key items of theoretical courses.  

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination: 60%

Laboratory exercise: 40% 

Recommended or required Bibliography

•Electronics Circuits Theory and exercises K. Karibakas Publisher: Christine and Vassiliki Kordali (in greek)

•Introduction to Electronics, S.Loutridis, Publisher: Tziolas (in greek)

•Electronics, 7th edition, MalvinoA, Bates D. Publisher Tzioloas (in greek)

•Liaperdos J, “Introduction to Electronics” [e-book] 

Available at: http://hdl.handle.net/11419/50

•Tobras G. ΤΟΜΠΡΑΣ, Γ. 2016. “Introduction to Electronics” [e-book] (in greek)

Available at: http://hdl.handle.net/11419/2038

•Nistazakis E., 2016. Electronics laboratory guide. [e-book] (in greek)

Available at: http://hdl.handle.net/11419/1217 

3rd Semester

MACHINE ELEMENTS I

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Face to face  
Weekly Hours: Lectures, 5 
ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

 

The course aims to introduce students study the main machine elements calculation and the correct element type selection for any application. The study of each Machine  Element includes the analysis of the geometry, construction materials, the most common loading conditions, the analytical calculation, the design, the manufacturing methods and how it functions  in a mechanical set.

 

Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:

 

•Describe and identify the main Machine parts and their subcategories.

•Design and develop the appropriate element for each application.

•Analyze the stress-strain state of each element under loading.

•Calculate the strength of each case study.

•Select materials and processing method of non-standard elements.

•Design and analyze Mechanical multiple-element arrangements.

•Predict potential failure conditions

•Specify maintenance program of every element

•Make damage assessment 

Module Description

1.   Introduction

2.   Tolerance - Connectors

3.   Introduction to Dynamic Loading

4.   Shafts-Spindles

5.   Shaft-Hub Connections

6.   Screws-Fasteners

7.   Mechanical Springs

8.   Rolling Contact Bearings

9.   Journal Bearings

10. Couplings-Clutches 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination: 100% 

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Stergiou J, Stergiou Κ.: “Machine Elements ΙΙ”. Sychroni Ekdotiki. Athens 2004.(in Greek)

2.Fridakis Μ.: “Machine Elements  ΙΙΙ”. Sychroni Ekdotiki. Athens 2004.(in Greek)

3.Fridakis Μ.: “Machine Elements  ΙΙΙ”. Sychroni Ekdotiki. Athens 2004.(in Greek)

4.R.C.Juvinall,K.M.Marshek: Fundamentals of Machine Component Design,2nd ed. John Wiley & Sons. Toronto  

METALLIC MATERIALS TECHNOLOGY & QUALITY CONTROL

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures and exercises, face-to-face. 
Weekly Hours:  
ECTS:  
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Initially, the course is an introduction to the basic concepts in technology of metallic materials and their quality control. Subsequently, the course is focusing in specific concepts and techniques related to steels and their heat treatment. It is providing the background related to material science for the majority of the specialty courses.

 

The aim of the course is to deliver the necessary knowledge and skills to student in order  to solve basic problems related to engineering materials.

 

Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:

1.Use and distinguish the concepts of (a) certification, (b) Standardization, (c) Accredited Laboratories and (d) Calibration

2.Identify and classifythe main engineering materials based on their chemical composition and determine their mechanical properties.

3.Characterize the microstructure of metallic materials and to measure/ compare/evaluate crucial mechanical properties, using standard                   methodologies.

4.Design and perform heat treatments of steels in order to improve their mechanical properties.

5.Evaluate the results of such heat treatments on the materials’ microstructure and mechanical properties and propose corrective actions, if             necessary.

6.Select the appropriate tool steel andrecommend the proper heat treatment sequence for specific targeted engineering applications. 

Module Description

Theory

The core modules of the course include:

 

1.Introduction to the fundamentals of Quality with emphasis to the Metallic Materials Sector: Quality Management Procedures, Quantitative Assessment Tools and Critical Control Points. Bodies for Accreditation, Certification and Standardization. Metrology, Reference Standards, Measurements Laboratories, Calibration of measuring devices. Quality Control Plans, Technical Specifications, EU Directives and Euro Norms, Conformity and CE labeling.

2.Metallic materials: properties of metals, free energy and Gibb’s law. 

3.Crystalline structure: metallic bond, crystalline structure of metals, principal crystal structures, lattice systems. Atomic packing factor, d-spacing of lattice, atomic coordination. 

4.Crystalline structure imperfections: point defects, line defects (dislocations), planar defects, bulk defects. 

5.Work hardening: plastic deformation of metals, cold work hardening of metals, stress relieving.

6.Alloy phase diagrams: phases, lever rule. 

7.Fe-Cem phase diagram: steels, binary phase diagram of steels, microstructure, microstructure transformations during heating and quenching. Steels’ heat treatment. 

8.Steel Hardening: isothermal transformation (TTT diagrams), continuous cooling transformation (CCT diagrams), quantitative phase diagram of tool steels

9.Alloy elements: alloy steels, effect of alloying elements on steels properties. 

10.Tool Steels’ technical brochures: Standardization, applications, mechanical and physical properties, heat treatment and machining recommendations according to technical brochures provided by steel manufacturers.

11.Fe-C phase diagram: Cast irons, Fe-C (graphite) phase diagram. Phases of cast iron, cast irons’ classification, heat treatment, applications. 

12.Light metal alloys: main categories (Al,Ti), properties, heat treatment and applications

13.Copper alloys: Classification, main properties, heat treatment and applications.

 

Laboratory 

The workshop includes three modules and the following laboratory exercises:

 

1.Introduction: Standards, Directives and standardization of laboratory testing, structure of technical reports, verification and calibration of measuring devices, Conformity verification of metallic products, safety rules in testing laboratories.

2.Module A (five distinct laboratory exercises): Quality control measurements (hardness testing, microscopic examination of metals, reinforcing concrete steels’ conformity verification according to the latest Greek regulation, temperature measurements with thermocouples, heat treatment furnaces, thermal analysis of alloys).

3.Module B (four distinct laboratory exercises): Design and implementation of heat treatment on plain carbon steels (1045 or 1060 AISI), Design and implementation of heat treatment of O1 AISI tool steel.

4.Module C: Practical training in groups. Design of one of the implemented heat treatments of module B. Heat treatment sequence control by hardness testing and metallographic analysis of the steel structure. Evaluation of the heat treatment and proposal of possible corrections in order to comply with the design requirements.

 

 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Language of evaluation: Greek and English for ERASMUS students.

 

Theory: 60%

Final Written examination. Open references.

 

Laboratory exercise: 40%

Three modules consisting of three to five exercises with two written examinations with open references and a group project. The evaluation of laboratory part consist of:  

First module (five laboratory exercises),40%: 

•Each laboratory exercise the first section requires individual technical report 

•Written examination consisting of problem solving.Open references.

Second module (four laboratory exercises), 40%: 

•Written examination consisting of multiple choice questionnaires. Open references.

Third module, 20%: 

•Technical report based on the group project.

 

At the beginning of each semester students take the exam questionnaires from the previous semester and the evaluation procedure. 

Recommended or required Bibliography

Textbooks (in Greek)

1.Medrea C (2015). Quality Control and Technology of Metallic Materials, Teaching notes(in Greek).

2.Psyllaki P (2013). Quality Assurance Systems and Accredited Laboratories, Teaching notes(in Greek).

3.Chryssoulakis Y, Pantelis D (2013). Metallic Materials’ Science and Technology, Papasotiriou publications, Athens (in Greek).

4.Callister W. Jr (2015). Materials Science and Engineering, An introduction, Tziolas publications ,Thessaloniki (in Greek).

5.Triantafyllidis G (2014). Physical Metallurgy for non-Μetallurgists, Tziolas publications, Thessaloniki (in Greek).

6.Vatalis S.A (2008). Materials Science and Technology, Ziti publications, Thessaloniki(in Greek).

7.Tsikritzis L (2009). Laboratory Exercises for Materials Technology and Quality, Kozani (in Greek).

 

Relevant Scientific Journals

•Materials Science and Engineering A, B, C

•Metallurgical Transactions

•Acta Materialia

•Journal of Alloys and Compounds

•Materials and Design 

FLUID MECHANICS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures, working groups, laboratory. 
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 2

Classroom exercises, 1

Laboratory exercises, 2 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The course aims to provide the graduate with the knowledge and skills needed to be able to understand and solve problems of fluid mechanics found in different applications of mechanical engineering science.

Objectives of the course is to make students able to:

a) formulate the basic laws governing fluid dynamics and apply them to solve technical problems,

b) solve incompressible problems of internal and external flows,

c) use and choose measuring instruments for measuring flow quantities and

d) attend successfully courses of the undergraduate curriculum of the Department related to fluid mechanics.

Upon successful completion of the course, the student will be able to:

•Describe the fundamental principles governing the fluid dynamics.

•Identify and analyze problems of hydrostatic and aerostatic.

•Identify the fundamental equations of conservation of mass, momentum and energy in differential and integral form and explain the physical meaning of the individual terms.

•Use the fundamental conservation equations of mass, momentum and energy for the analysis of one-dimensional flow problems.

•Apply analytical methods for the calculation of fluid quantities in practical applications.

•Apply the necessary procedures for conducting laboratory activities and prepare a corresponding technical report.

•Analyze and present a study case (individual or in co-operation with fellow students) that may include computational and / or experimental section using computational and experimental fluid dynamics tools, combining information and communication technologies.

•Identify, organize and manage bibliographical sources and information from the internet.

•Use the training material as a basis for future self-education in the subject. 

Module Description

1.Introductory concepts.

2.Fluid statics.

3.Fluid kinematics.

4.Fluid dynamics equations.

5.Turbulent flows.

6.Incompressible 1-d flows in pipes.

7.Applications on the course subjects.

8.Laboratory exercises and case studies (for the theoretical part of the course). 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Language of evaluation: Greek and English (for Erasmus students).

Ι. Theoretical part (60%): Midterm Evaluation (40%) and written final examination (60%), that include:

oShort answer questions (20%)

oProblem solving (80%)

ΙΙ. Laboratory part (40%): Individual or / and team (3 students) essay/report (40%) and written or oral or presentation for each lab exercise and study case (60%).

 

The subjects of the written examination and their answers are posted on the course asynchronous e-learning platform and are accessible by the students attending the course. 

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Cengel Y., Cimbala J., Fluid Mechanics: Fundamentals and Applications, McGraw Hill; 3rd edition, 2013.

2.Munson B.R., Rothmayer A.P., Okiishi T.H. and Huebsch W.W., Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics, Wiley; 7th edition, 2012.

3.White F., Fluid Mechanics, McGraw-Hill; 7th Edition, 2010. 

THERMODYNAMICS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Face-to-face 
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 2

Exercises, 2

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

This course is the basic special lesson on the concepts of thermodynamics.

 

This course aims to introduce students to the basic concepts of thermodynamics associated with the behavior of both the ideal gas and the pure substances. With the consolidation of these concepts and the selection of appropriate equations by the students solved problems of the specialty of mechanical engineer. In this sense the course is the basis on which developed specific methodologies to individual special courses for the next semesters.

 

Finally, the aim of the course is to understand the students the importance of thermodynamics in both study and resolve other energy problems. 

 

Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

• Know the fundamental laws of thermodynamics

• Understand the thermodynamic properties governing energy systems

• Apply the thermodynamic laws to solving energy problems

• Evaluates the performance thermal engines, refrigeration equipment and heat pumps

• Analyze and calculate various thermodynamic sizes in energy systems 

Module Description

1. Thermodynamic systems, Thermodynamic properties, Thermodynamic equilibrium, Thermodynamic processes, Thermodynamic cycle

2. Energy, Work, Heat, Laws of ideal gas equation of state of ideal gas equation van der Waals, Project Ideal Gas

3. Properties of pure substance, Tables of thermodynamic properties

4. First law of thermodynamics, equation of continuity, specific heat capacities, Joule-Thomson coefficient

5. Second law of thermodynamics, Heat Engine, Engine Cooling, Heat Pump, Carnot Cycle

6. Entropy pure substance, Chart Mollier, Equations Tds, entropy of ideal gas equation Clausius-Clapeyron relation Helmholtz function Gibbs Maxwell equations

7. cycle heat engine (Otto, Diesel, Brayton, Rankine)

8. Nozzles

 

Class work

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final examination: 80%

Ιintermediate written examination: 20% 

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Suggested literature:

P. Νikas, 2011, Applied Thermodynamics for Engineers, Leader Enterprises Ltd, (in Greek) 

Cengel & Boles, 2011, Thermodynamics for Engineers, Τziolas, (in Greek)

A. Papaioannou, 2007, Thermodynamics (Basic principles - Pure substances), Volume 1 & 2, Edition Korali, (in Greek)

Α. Polizakis, 2013, Thermodynamics and Advance thermodynamics, Heat Cool Power, (in Greek)

Moran & Shapiro, 2006, Fundamentals of engineering Thermodynamics, J. Wiley & Sons

 

-Related Scientific journals:

Renewable Energy

Applied Energy

Energy

Energy Conversion and Management

Applied Thermal Engineering

International Journal of Exergy  

ENVIRONMENT & INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures, laboratory exercises  
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 2

Tutorials, 2 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The main objective of the Module is that the students acquire the knowledge for the most significant envronmental problems, their causes, impacts and mitigation measures with their advantages and disadvantages, as well as the interrelation of the environmental problems with the development. 

Upon completion of the Module, the students will be able to: 

i)identify the main global environmental problems 

ii)identify the most significant pollutants, their origin and the elimination measures 

iii)evaluate the most significant reasons for the GreenHouse effect as well as the national and European efforts for its mitigation 

iv)be able to diagnose the ozon depletion as well as the acid rain problems and suggest the most suitable methods for their minimisation

v)recognize the desertification problem as well as the biodiversity reduction problem 

vi)identify the most significant impacts from the use of nuclear energy, the risks, the main advantages and potential of nuclear energy in medicine and science in general 

vii)suggest the most appropriate solutions for the mitigation of sea pollution impacts, oils spills, thermal pollution and pollution from other substances 

viii)Understand the definition and classification of toxic wastes as well as the main directions for their minimization. 

ix)Be able to face, either as individuals or in teams major environmental problems and suggest techniques for their mitigation.  

Module Description

•Developing environmentally friendly, European Sustainability Programs

•Development, Environment and Sustainable Development, Pollution Universality and National Rights

•Energy and Air Pollution, Air Pollution Recording in Greece

•Greenhouse Effect, Greenhouse Gases, National Program for Climate Change

•Kyoto Protocol, Mechanisms for the implementation of the Kyoto Protocol 

•The European Trading Scheme – Permits Trading – Advantages and disadvantages 

•Apparent destruction of stratospheric ozone – Ozone Depletion 

•Acid Rain-Destruction of Historic Monuments

•Introduction to Concepts of Social-Environmental Cost Energy Studies, 

•Determination of External Cost of Energy

•Planetary Environmental Problems

•Soil Desertification

•Biodiversity 

•Water Pollution, Sea Pollution,  Thermal Pollution of the Sea

•Oil Spills Assessment Methods

•Nuclear-nuclear applications, radioactive Contamination-Nuclear Accidents

•Power generation from nuclear plants 

•Major nuclear accidents – Cause analysis

•Introduction to Toxic Waste, Toxic Waste Management

•Classification of Toxic Waste

•Introduction to National and European Legal Framework of Environmental Protection Legislation

•Tutorials and Exercises for the calculation of main environmental indices related to the above phenomena

 

Laboratory Exercises and Experiments 

  • Air Pollution Assessment Models 
  • Transboundary Pollution 
  • Greenhouse Effect 
  • Acid Rain Impacts 
  • Nuclear Energy – Impacts in the Human Environment 
  • Sea Pollution from Hydrocarbons
  • Deterioration of Aquifers 
  • Soil Quality 
  • Noise Pollution 
  • Solid waste recycling  

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Evaluation Language: Greek.

Ι. For the Theoretical Part of the Module 

a. Evaluation through quick tests in the end of the lectures 20% 

b. Participation in projects and field visits 20% 

Two hours written exam (60-100% for the students that do not participate in the assessments a and b. The written exams include: 

-Quick answer questions (40%)

-Application problems solution (60%)

ΙΙ. For the Laboratory Part of the Module, individual and/or team report after each laboratory exercise and test (oral and written) in the subject of each lab exercise. Final test in the total laboratory material. 

 The questions of the written final exams and their answers are uploaded in the subjects databank of the computer platform of the Module and are accessible from the students that attend the Module.  

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Kaldellis, J.K, Chalvatzis C., 2005, "Environment and Industrial Development: Sustainability – Air Pollution", Stamoulis Ed., /960-351-589-2 (in Greek).

2.Kaldellis, J.K, Kondili E., 2005, "Environment and Industrial Development: Major Environmental Problems – Waste Treatment", Stamoulis Ed., /960-351-601-5 (in Greek).

3.Allen D.T., Rosselot K.S., 1997, "Pollution Prevention for Chemical Processes", Wiley-Interscience.

4.Bank M., 1995, "Basiswissen Umwelttechnik", ed. Vogel Buchverlag.

5.Baumol W.J., 1988, The Theory of Environmental Policy, Cambridge University Press /0521311128

6.Boubel R.W., Fox D.L., Turner D.B., Stern A.C., 1994, "Fundamentals of Air Pollution", ed. Academic Press, New York.

7.Culp R., Wesner G.M., Culp G., 1978, "Handbook of Advanced Wastewater Treatment", 2nd Edition, Van Nostrand Reinhold.

8.Davis HC, 1997, Introduction to Environmental Engineering, McGraw-Hill /0070159181

9.McDougall, 2001, "Integrated Solid Waste Management", Blackwell Science.

10.Pigou A.C., 1952, The Economic of Welfare, The Macmillan Press

11.Thurston, 2001, Environmental Engineering, McGraw-Hill /0071361820 

INDUSTRIAL MEASUREMENTS: PRINCIPLES & INSTRUMENTATION

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures in class and laboratory experiments, with student participation 
Weekly Hours:

Theory, 3

Laboratory, 2

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The purpose of this introductory course is to provide to the students the fundamental knowledge, skills and experience for selecting the proper measuring techniques and systems, to use data acquisition systems, to statistically analyze the data, to present the results in a clear and concise format and apply all the above in the measurement of specific physical quantities.

Upon the course completion the students will be able to:

• Distinguish between precision and bias measurement errors and their sources (calibration errors, reading errors, etc.).

•Estimate the uncertainty of independent variables from sampled sets of measurements and of variables which are depended on the measured data sets (propagation of error).

•Describe time varying signals in both the time and frequency domains.

•Describe the underlying physical principles governing the behavior of commonly used sensors.

•Understand the relationship between the physical properties of a sensor and its time and frequency response when used in a measurement system.

•Process a signal from a sensor by using appropriate processing techniques (amplification, filtering, etc.), record the signal using an electronic data acquisition system (analog or digital), convert it to the appropriate units, and calibrate the sensor and data acquisition system.

•Make engineering measurements of physical quantities such as temperature, force and strain, using multiple instruments.

•Present data in an appropriate manner through the use of tables and graphs.

•Communicate effectively in written form information relating to the design and/or results of an engineering experiment. 

Module Description

Theory:

•Basic concepts and Terminology of Measurement Methods 

•Static and dynamic characteristics of signals (Frequency Analysis) 

•Statistical Analysis of Signals 

•Uncertainty analysis

•Signal Conditioning

•Sampling, Digital Devices and Data Acquisition 

•Response of Measurement Systems

•Strain or Temperature Measurements 

•Technical Writing 

Lab: 

The course includes practical training in the lab and extensive use of SCADA and data/numerical analysis software (LabVIEW, MATLAB/OCTAVE/SCILAB). 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Student evaluation language: Greek  (English for Erasmus students)

 

THEORY (60%):

Ι. Written Final Exam (60%) that consists of:

-Problems that lead to numerical results, however the emphasis is placed in the solution procedure 

-Comparative evaluation of theoretical concepts

ΙΙ. Midterm exams and (40%)

 

LAB (40%): 

Written and oral exams (60%)

Individual and group exercises and technical reports and memoranda on experiments (40%)

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Figliola, R.S., Beasley, D.E., 2000, Theory and Design for Mechanical Measurements, 3rd Ed., John Wiley.

2.Dunn, P., 2010, Measurement, Data Analysis, and Sensor Fundamentals for Engineering and Science, 2nd Ed.,   CRC Press.

3.Wheeler, A.J., and Ganji, A.R., 2004, Introduction to Engineering Experimentation, 2nd Ed., Prentice Hall.

4.Holman, J.P., 200, Experimental Methods for Engineers, 7th Ed., McGraw-Hill.

5.Beckwith, T.G., Marangoni, R.D., Lienhard, J.H., 1990, Mechanical Measurements, 4th Ed., Addison-Wesley.

6.Dally, J.W., Riley, W.F., and McConnell, K.G., 1993, Instrumentation for Engineering Measurements, J. Wiley.

7.Doebelin, E.O., 2004, Measurement Systems: Application and Design, 5th Ed., McGraw-Hill.

8.Gardner, J., 1994, Microsensors: Principles and Applications, John Wiley, ((Μετάφραση Ιωάννης Πεταλάς, Εκδόσεις Τζιόλα, 2000).

9.Benedict, R.P., 1984, Fundamentals of temperature, pressure, and flow measurements, 3rd Ed., John Wiley

10.Bevington, P., and Robinson, D.K., 2003, Data Reduction and Error Analysis for the Physical Sciences, 3rd Ed., McGraw Hill.

11.Taylor, J.R., 1997, An Introduction to Error Analysis: The Study of Uncertainties in Physical Measurements, 2nd Ed., University Books.

12.Montgomery, D.C., and Runger, G.C., 1999, Applied Statistics and Probability for Engineers, 2nd Ed., Wiley. 

4th Semester

HEAT TRANSFER

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures, working groups, laboratory 
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 2

Tutorials, 1

Laboratory exercises, 2 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The course aims to provide the graduate with the knowledge and skills needed to be able to understand and solve problems of Heat Transfer found in different applications of mechanical engineering science.

Objectives of the course is to make students able to:

a)formulate the basic laws governing Heat Transfer and apply them to solve technical problems,

b)solve one-dimensional and steady-state problems,

c)use and choose measuring instruments for measuring thermal quantities and

d)attend successfully courses of the undergraduate curriculum of the Department related to Heat Transfer.

Upon successful completion of the course, the student will be able to:

•Describe the fundamental principles governing the Heat Transfer;

•Identify the different modes of Heat Transfer (Conduction, Convection and Radiation);

•Identify the fundamental equations of heat transfer, Fourier’s Law, Heat Conduction Equation in differential and integral form and explain the physical meaning of the individual terms;

•Analyze one-dimensional heat flow problems with the use of Heat Transfer fundamental equations;

•Apply analytical methods for the calculation of heat- and fluid- flow quantities in practical applications, such as heat exchangers etc.;

•Evaluate the operation of practical applications and propose optimal solutions;

•Apply the necessary procedures for conducting laboratory activities and prepare a corresponding technical report;

•Analyze and present a study case (individual or in co-operation with colleagues) that may include computational and / or experimental section using computational and experimental heat transfer tools, combining information and communication technologies;

•Identify, organize and manage bibliographical sources and information from the internet;

•Use the training material as a basis for future self-education in the subject. 

Module Description

i.Basics  of Heat Transfer

ii.Fundamentals of Heat Conduction

iii.One-dimensional and Steady-state Heat Conduction 

iv.Fundamentals of Heat Convection

v.Forced Thermal Convection on External Flows

vi.Forced Thermal Convection on Internal Flows

vii.Natural (Free) Heat Convection

viii.Heat Exchangers

ix.Heat Transfer from Finned Surfaces

x.Thermal Radiation

xi.Applications on the course subjects

xii.Laboratory exercises and case studies (for the theoretical part of the course) 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Language of assessment: Greek and English (for Erasmus students).

The final assessment is divided into 2 (two) parts:

a)The Theoretical part (60%)

b)The Laboratory part (40%)

Each assessed as follows:

I.Theoretical part (60%): Midterm Evaluation (40%) and written final examination (60%), that include:

oShort answer questions (20%)

oProblem solving (80%)

II.Laboratory part (40%): Individual or / and team (3 students) essay/report (40%) and written or oral or presentation for each lab exercise and study case (60%).

The subjects of the written examination and their answers are posted on the course asynchronous e-learning platform and are accessible by the students attending the course.

Recommended or required Bibliography

Greek Bibliography:

  • Nikas K.-S. P., 2010, Fundamentals of Heat Transfer for Engineers, self-edition (in Greek).
  • Nikas K.-S. P. & Papazoglou H., 2010, Fundamentals of Heat Transfer for Engineers – Brief Theory & Exercises, self-edition (in Greek).
  • Course Notes (in Greek)

English Bibliography:

  • Bejan A., 1993, Heat Transfer, John Wiley & sons Inc.
  • Cengel Y. A. 2002, Heat Transfer, A Practical Approach, McGraw – Hill (2nd edition).
  • Holman J. P., 2009, Heat Transfer, McGraw – Hill (10th edition).
  • Incropera F. P., Dewitt D. P., Bergman T. L., Lavine A. S., 2006, Introduction to Heat Transfer, John Wiley & sons, Inc. (5th  edition).
  • Kreith F., Bohn M. S., 2001, Principles of Heat Transfer, Thomson (6th edition).
  • Long C. A., 1999, Essential Heat Transfer, Pearson Education Ltd. 

MACHINE ELEMENTS II

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Face to face 
Weekly Hours: Lectures, 4 
ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

 

The course aims to analyze  power transmission train gears. The course includes the analysis of the geometry, reference to construction materials, strength analysis, the analytical calculation, the design and the manufacturing methods of all types of gears. Also makes an introduction to epicyclic mechanisms by analyzing the operation and applications especially in vehicle use.

 

Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:

 

•Describe and identify the main gears.

•Design and develop the appropriate gear for each application.

•Analyze the stress-strain state of power transmission train gears loading.

•Calculate the strength of each case study.

•Select materials and processing method of non-standard gears.

•Design and analyze Mechanical multiple-element arrangements.

•Design and calculate multistage gear reducers..

•Analyze and make kinematic and dynamic calculations of planetary systems mechanisms

•Predict potential failure conditions

•Specify maintenance program of every element

•Make damage assessment 

Module Description

1. Introduction

2. Fundamentals of gear meshing

3. Spur gears

4. Helical gears

5. Conical gears

6. Worm gears

7. Epicyclic mechanisms

8. Power flow 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final examination: 100% 

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Kostopoulos Th.:” Gears and gear reducers” Simeon. Athens 1991.(in Greek)

2.Fridakis Μ.: “Machine Elements  ΙΙΙ”. Sychroni Ekdotiki. Athens 2004.(in Greek)

3.Stergiou J, Stergiou Κ.: “Machine Elements ΙΙ”. Sychroni Ekdotiki. Athens 2004.(in Greek)

4.R.C.Juvinall,K.M.Marshek: Fundamentals of Machine Component Design,2nd ed. John Wiley & Sons. Toronto  

INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures, laboratories. 
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 3

Laboratory, 2

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

 

This course is introductory to Internal Combustion Engines (ICE).

It aims is to give the students a basic knowledge of the operational principals, the main components and the main subsystems involved, as well as the main operational parameters and how those affect the efficiency and the emissions.

 

Upon completion of the course, students will able to: 

1. Understand the structure and the basic operation of Internal Combustion Engines (ICE).

2. Describe the thermodynamic cycles ICEs are based on.

3. Understand the properties of the commonly used fuel, emissions, efficiency and the associated operation problems and limitations.

4. Understand the operation of the main subsystems (i.e. mixture preparation systems, ignition systems etc.) in an ICE. 

5. Understand ICE technical specifications and operational diagrams and to perform simple calculations related with ICEs. 

Module Description

1.Operation principals of reciprocating ICE.

2.2 stroke, 4 stroke, rotary piston (Wankel) engines.

3.Otto and Diesel engines.

4.Basic dimensions of the kinematic mechanism.

5.Main parts of a reciprocating ICE.

6.Theoretical and real thermodynamic cycles.

7.Theoretical and real operation diagrams.

8.Basic information about fuels, combustion and emissions from ICE.

9.Combustion related problems.

10.Mixture preparation systems for Otto and Diesel engines.

11.Other related operation cycles (Atkinson – Miller).

12.Ignition systems for Otto engines. 

13.Wankel engines.

14.Basic working principles of Internal Combustion Engine Turbines. 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Theory

•Final Written Examination.

 

Laboratory

•Group laboratory exercises. 

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Hasiotis P., 2013, Internal Combustion Engines Ι, Ion publications (in Greek).

2.Kiriakis N., 2006, Internal Combustion Engines, Sofia publications (in Greek).

3.Bohner Μ. et al., 2004, Automotive Technology Ι, Internal Combustion Engines, Ion publications (in Greek).

4.Rakopoulos C.D., 1996, Principles of Internal Combustion Engines, Fountas publications (in Greek).

5.Heywood J.B., 1998, Internal Combustion Engines Fundamentals, McGraw Hill.

6.Lumley J.M., 1999, Engines, An introduction, Cambridge University Press, N. York.

7.Pulkrabek, W., 2003, Engineering Fundamentals of the Internal Combustion Engine, PrenticeHall.

8.Bosch Automotive Handbook - 8th Edition, 2011, SAE International.

9.C. Ferguson, Α. Kirkpatrick, 2008, Internal Combustion Engines, (μετάφραση), Εκδόσεις Giapoulis S. & A. - Kaizer. Ο.Ε. publications                     (translation in Greek).

10.Lecture notes (electronic form). 

FLUID FLOW MACHINES

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures, working groups, laboratory. 
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 2

Classroom exercises, 1

Laboratory exercises, 2 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The course aims to provide the graduate with the knowledge and skills needed to be able to solve problems in fluid machinery installations responding adequately to the role of the mechanical engineer.

Objectives of the course is to make students able to:

a) Describe the operating principles of hydrodynamic machines and select, evaluate an incompressible flow turbomachine,

b) Analyze and design of a hydraulic network and a pump installation,

c) Conduct design study and dimensioning of a hydroelectric power station,

d) Analyze and design of ventilation systems and air management systems, and

e) Use and choose measuring instruments for conducting performance measurements in a fluid machine.

Upon successful completion of the course, the student will be able to:

•Discuss and analyze the flow in a turbomachine.

•Apply analytical methods for the prediction of fluid quantities in pipe and duct networks aiming to the selection of the suitable turbomachine and the identification of its principal characteristics.

•Design a pumping station, calculate initial and pump life cost.

•Conduct an initial centrifugal pump or fan design, using cad tools.

•Organize, perform and evaluate measurements in pumps, fans and water turbines test rigs.

•Use the training material as a basis for future self-education in the subject. 

Module Description

1.Introductory concepts (Classification and non-dimensional parameters of turbomachines, absolute and relative fluid motion in a turbomachine, Euler equation, impeller types, special hydrodynamic phenomena).

2.Pumps (Performance curves, similarity laws, operating point, parallel and series operation of pumps, analysis and design of a pumping station, pump selection, operation and monitoring of pumping stations, life cycle cost, design aspects of centrifugal pumps).

3.Water turbines (Types, operating principles and performance, design aspects and dimensioning, selection criteria, hydroelectric power stations and reversible pump-turbine technology).

4.Fans-Blowers-Compressors (Types, performance and applications).

5.Gas turbines (Types and performance).

6.Applications on the course subjects.

7.Laboratory exercises and case studies (for the theoretical part of the course). 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Language of evaluation: Greek and English (for Erasmus students).

Ι. Theoretical part (60%): Midterm Evaluation (40%) and written final examination (60%), that include:

oShort answer questions (20%)

oProblem solving (80%)

ΙΙ. Laboratory part (40%): Individual or / and team (3 students) essay/report (40%) and written or oral or presentation for each lab exercise and study case (60%).

 

The subjects of the written examination and their answers are posted on the course asynchronous e-learning platform and are accessible by the students attending the course. 

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Lobanoff V.S. and Ross R.R., Centrifugal Pumps: Designs and Application, Jaico Publ. House, 2005.

2.Round G.F., Incompressible Flow Turbomachines: Design, Selection, Applications, and Theory, 1st edition, Butterworth-Heinemann; 2004.

3.Wright T. and Gerhart P., Fluid Machinery: Application, Selection, and Design, 2nd Edition, CRC Press; 2009. 

RENEWABLE (SOFT) ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures and lab exercises with physical presence of the students in class 
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 2

Tutorials, 1

Laboratory exercises, 2 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The main objective of the course is the familiarization of the students with the soft (renewable) energy sources, together with a deeper understanding of the latter basic advantages, disadvantages and  main applications. Additionally, the fundamental principles of energy conversion associated with each of the soft (renewable) energy sources and respective technologies are presented, along with an approach of the subject under a techno-economic perspective. 

 

Upon successful completion of the course students will be able to:

 

a) identify the main components of a wind turbine and their function

b) measure wind speed and wind direction at a given site

c) evaluate the quality and main features of wind potential

d) estimate the wind energy yield of a wind turbine

e) measure the solar radiation of a given site

f) evaluate the quality and main features of solar potential

g) determine suitable solar water heaters or arrays of solar collectors for the satisfaction of given consumers' thermal energy needs

h) estimate the main dimensions (size) of a photovoltaic installation 

i) design and properly size a greenhouse

j) evaluate the energy potential of different forms of biomass

k) determine the main dimensions of an anaerobic bioreactor

l) identify the main characteristics of biofuels

m) evaluate the quality of hydropower potential

n) determine the dimensions of small hydropower plants

o) estimate the geothermal potential of a given area 

p) suggest the most suitable applications for the exploitation of a given geothermal field 

q) identify the main characteristics of seawater (tidal and wave) energy potential 

r) undertake techno-economic analyses with regards to soft (renewable) energy projects

s) determine social & environmental impacts deriving from soft (renewable) energy sources' projects 

Module Description

The basic sections of the course include the following:

i.Introduction to the global energy and environment problem

ii.Familiarization with the main soft (renewable) energy sources, advantages-disadvantages

iii.Wind energy, historical background, current evolutions, international technology trends. 

iv.Wind turbines-types of wind turbines, advantages-disadvantages, wind turbine components, operational performance

v.Wind potential measuring instruments, evaluation of wind potential

vi.Energy production of wind turbines

vii.Wind parks

viii.Solar energy, theoretical and experimental determination of solar irradiance

ix.Solar collectors, solar energy applications for the satisfaction of thermal loads

x.Photovoltaic phenomenon, photovoltaic energy production 

xi.Introduction to greenhouses

xii.Systems of biomass exploitation - Energy production from biomass, biofuels 

xiii.Determination of hydropower potential, large and small hydropower plants 

xiv.Introduction to geothermal energy

xv.Other soft (renewable) energy sources, wave and tidal energy, temperature difference in seawaters

xvi.Techno-economic evaluation of soft (renewable) energy sources plants

xvii.Environmental and social impacts of soft energy sources' exploitation 

 

Lab Exercises:

Wind turbines - Basic operational parameters

Measurement of wind potential (wind speed, direction, gusts, etc)

Energy yield of wind turbines

Measurement of solar radiation (beam, diffuse, global)

Energy performance analysis of horizontal (flat) - concentrating solar collectors

Photovoltaic panels, topologies, energy performance 

Main operation parameters and energy performance simulation of solar-based greenhouses

Study of operational parameters of small hydropower plants

Energy performance simulation of a bioreactor

Study and design of geothermal applications

Economic feasibility study for soft (renewable) energy sources' projects 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

 

Language of assessment: Greek (English for Erasmus students).

Ι. For the theoretical part of the course, assessment methods include:

a. Short tests at the end of lectures (20%) 

b. Participation in assignments and field visits (20%)

c. Two hour written exam (60% or up to 100% for students not engaged in assessment methods (a) and/or (b))

Written exams include:

-Short Q&A (40%)

-Solving of applied problems (60%)

ΙΙ. For the lab part of the course, assessment methods include 

  • personal and/or group assignment for each separate lab exercise.
  • test (written or oral) associated with the subject of the lab exercise. 
  • Final exam for all lab exercises. 

 

Exam papers and answers are uploaded in the past-paper repository, available in the e-learning platform of the course, accessible to all students attending the course.  

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Kaldellis J.Κ., 2005, Wind Energy Management, 2nd edition, Ed. Ath. Stamoulis / 9603515760.

2.J.K. Kaldellis, K.A Kavadias, 2001, Lab Exercises of Soft Energy Applications, Ed. Ath. Stamoulis / 960-351-345-8.

3.J.K. Kaldellis, K.A. Kavadias, 2005, Computational Applications of Soft Energy Applications (Wind Energy - Small Hydropower), Ed. Ath. Stamoulis / 960-351-631-7.

4.J.K. Kaldellis, G.C. Spyropoulos, K.A. Kavadias, 2007, Computational Applications of Soft Energy Applications (Solar Radiation - PV Installations - Solar Thermal Systems), Ed. Ath. Stamoulis / 978-960-351-686-6.

5.Bergeles G., 1996, Wind Turbines, Ed. Symeon / 960734619x.

6.Duffie J.A. Beckman W.A., 1991, Solar Engineering of Thermal Processes, Ed. John Wiley & Sons, New York / 0471510564.

7.Johansson T. Kelly H. Reddy A. Williams R., 1994, Renewable Energy, Ed. Island Press, Washington DC / 1559631392.

8.Buresch M., 1983, Photovoltaic Energy Systems, Ed. Mc-Graw Hill, New York / 0070089523.

9.Sick F. Erge T., 1996, Photovoltaics in Buildings, Ed. James & James, London / 1873936591.

10.European Commission, 2000, New and Improved Small Hydropower Technologies for the Balkan Peninsula Market, Workshop Proceedings.

11.Papantonis D., 2001, Small Hydropower Plants, Ed. Symeon / 9607888235.

12.Owen W.F., 1982, Energy in Waste Water Treatment, Ed. Prentice Hall Englewood Cliffs, NJ / 0132776650.

13.U.S. Department of Energy, 1998, Strategic Plan for the Geothermal Energy Program, Ed. DOE National Laboratory / GO-10098572.

14.Ross D., 1995, Power from the Waves, Ed. Oxford University Press / 0198565119 

NUMERICAL ANALYSIS & COMPUTATIONAL APPLICATIONS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Face-to-face 
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 3 (2+1)

Laboratory Exercises, 2 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, students will have:

•thorough knowledge and critical understanding of the theory and principles of numerical and the implementation of corresponding algorithms in the computer to solve particular problems,

•knowledge and skills in basic statistical issues (linear regression - correlation, analysis of variance, non-parametric hypothesis testing) by using computer systems and

•sufficient knowledge and synthetic skills to understand basic principles and methods acquiring abilities solving mathematical problems and analyzing statistical data.

 

Upon completion of the course, students:

•will have a thorough knowledge of the theoretical construction and study of numerical methods, and the implementation of corresponding algorithms in the computer systems to solve particular problems,

•will be familiar with the study of basic statistical issues (linear regression - correlation, analysis of variance, non-parametric hypothesis testing) with application in computer systems and

•they will have acquired the necessary knowledge and skills to understand basic principles and methods thus being able to utilize in solving mathematical problems and analyzing statistical data.

 

More specifically, students will be able to:

•Search, analysis and synthesis of data and information using and applying the required technologies/software.

•Decision making.

•Autonomous work.

•Teamwork.

•Working in an international environment.

•Working in a multidisciplinary environment.

•Production of new research ideas.

•Respect for the natural environment.

•Ability of both criticism and self-criticism.

•Promotion of free, creative and inductive thinking.

Module Description

The core modules of the course include:

Approximate methods: 

•Solving nonlinear equations

•Interpolation (Linear interpolation, Lagrange interpolating polynomials, Newton’s divided-difference polynomials, Newton’s finite-difference polynomials).

•Approximation (Least-Squares Regression Analysis, Simple Linear Regression, Logarithmic Regression, Exponential Regression, Power Regression, Multiple Linear Regressions, Coefficient of determination, Analysis of variance in model selection).

•Numerical Integration (Trapezoidal rule, Simpson’s rules).

•Solution of differential equations (Euler’s method, modifications and improvements of Euler’s method, Runge-Kutta method).

•Finite Difference Methods.

•Finite Volume Methods.

•Finite Element Methods.

•Boundary Element Methods.

•Solving Linear Equations Systems.

•Solving Equations Navier-Stokes.

•Turbulent Flow and Turbulence Modeling.

•Compressor Flow.

•Improving efficiency and accuracy.

•Specific issues.

•Applications modules of the course.

 

Laboratory:

The workshop includes the following laboratory exercises:

•This course introduces students to physical models and mathematical methods that are widely encountered in various branches of engineering. Illustrative examples are used to motivate mathematical topics including ordinary and partial differential equations, and stability analysis. Analytical techniques that yield exact solutions to problems are developed when possible, but in many cases, numerical calculations are employed using programs such as Matlab and Mathematica. Students will learn the importance of mathematics in engineering. 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final written examination for the theoretical part of the course: 60%.

•Final written examination: 80%

•Interim exams (advance): 20%

 

Continuous evaluation and final examination for the Laboratory part: 40%.

•Weekly laboratory work-exercise

•Weekly written examination 

Recommended or required Bibliography

  • Alexandropoulos, A., Katopodis, E., Paliatsos, A., Prezerakos, N. (1994). Statistics. Syxroni Ekdodiki (ISBN: 960-7344-33-2).
  • Ayyub, B.M., McQuen, R.H., 1996, Numerical Methods for Engineers, Prentice Hall.
  • Chapra S., Canale R., 2009, Numerical Methods for Engineers, McGraw – Hill (5th edition).
  • Smith I. M., Griffiths D. V., 2006, Numerical Methods for Engineers, Taylor & Francis (2nd edition). 

5th Semester

HEATING & AIR-CONDITIONING

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Face-to-face 
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 3

Laboratory, 2 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The course is a specialty course based on the heating and air conditioning.

This course aims at understanding and interpretation of conditioning systems and the introduction of students to basic heating and cooling concepts in order the student to be able to distinguish, explain and assess the factors of a system as well as to apply new and innovative technologies.

Finally, the aim of the course is the understanding by students of the importance of heating and air conditioning systems and can solve related problems and implement energy-saving technologies.

 

 

Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

• Understand the basics and individual characteristics of heating systems - air conditioning.

• Acquire the knowledge related to the methods and techniques of the study and the management of air conditioning systems - heating and how they are used to ensure techno-economic results.

• Distinguish the main roles in a real case, or a case study and assess the role of stakeholders in implementing the system.

• Uses and apply the laws of thermodynamics, mechanics of fluids and heat transfer in order to identify key elements for an efficient system.

• Evaluate by comparing heating and air conditioning systems

• Analyzes and calculates the main and sub-system components.

• Co-operate with fellow students to create and present a plan in a case study involving the design and heating-air conditioning system study. 

Module Description

Theory

1. Comfort conditions - design.

2. Description, study and calculations of basic heating systems.

3. Calculation of thermal needs with standard EN 12831.

4. Cooling Load Calculation method CLTD / SCL / CLF.

5. Psychrometry (situations air changes).

6. Dimensioning of pipes and ducts.

7. Networks airway orifices.

8. Central air conditioning and dispensing systems.

9. Design hydronic heating systems - cooling.

10. Control systems. Fan coils and calculation.

11. Energy saving in air conditioning systems - heating.

12. Report to the modern sophisticated systems of these facilities with application examples.

13. Solution of numerical problems of part or all of actual installations.

 

 Lab exercises.

 

•HVAC system design considerations.

•Study and analysis of Head losses in building.

•Study and analysis in hot water distribution pipelines.

•Study and analysis of heating systems.

•Study and analysis of air-conditioning systems.  

•Psychrometry.

•Exercises in experimental Central Air-conditioning unit.

•Presentation working mode and experimental cooling tower.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination: 60%

Laboratory exercise: 40%

 

 

Theory:

Final written Examination: 80%

Interim exams : 20%

 

Laboratory:

 

Final written Examination:50%

Interim exams: 20%

Laboratory reports: 30% 

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Μ.G.Vrachopoulos ,2004,Analytical approach for central heating, ISBN:9789603514879 Stamoulis publication (in Greek). 

2.Recknagel-Sprenger , 1997 , Heating – Air conditioning ,1997. ISBN 3-486-26213-0 (in Greek). 

3.McQuiston, Faye C. Heating,Ventilating and Air Conditioning ,Analysis & Design , 1999 ,  ISBN: 9789604114207 ,ION publications, (in Greek).

4.Ronald H. Howell, Harry J. Sauer, Willima J. Coad , 1998 ,  Principles of Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning. ASHRAE Inc, ISBN 1-883413-56-7  C. 

5.Paul Lang: Principles of Air Conditioning ,1997,ION publications , ISBN 960-405-7 (in Greek). 

6.ASHRAE Handbook 1997 Fundamentals. ASHRAE Inc 1997, SI Edition, ISBN 1-883413-45-1• 

7.ASHRAE Handbook 1998 Refrigeration. ASHRAE Inc 1998, SI Edition, ISBN 1-883413-54-0• 

8.ASHRAE Handbook 1995 HVAC Applications. ASHRAE Inc 1995, SI Edition, ISBN 1-883413-• 

9.ASHRAE Handbook 1996 HVAC Systems and Equipment. ASHRAE Inc 1996, SI Edition, ISBN 1-883413-•  

HYBRID POWER GENERATION SYSTEMS & ENERGY SAVING

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures in classroom, laboratory exercises in groups with natural presence and participation of all students. 
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 2

Application Examples, 1

Laboratory, 2 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The objective of the course is for students to familiarize with the most established categories of hybrid systems and their application potential in the Greek and the European region. In addition, the main principles of techno-economic evaluation of similar systems are presented. In parallel, the opportunity is given to students to understand the operation principles of energy storage systems. Finally, students acquire knowledge in the fields of energy saving and rational use of energy, as well as in the optimum management of natural resources in all end-sectors (buildings, industry, agriculture, transportation, etc). At the laboratory level, students are trained in different scenarios of energy management, with the use of the experimental equipment of the lab and more precisely with the autonomous hybrid power station operated by the Soft Energy Applications & Environmental Performance Lab (SEALAB), understanding also in practice how an energy storage device behaves. Finally, special emphasis is given on the evaluation of energy saving techniques and on the rational use of energy. Upon successful completion of the course, students will have developed skills in the following:  

•Understanding of all parameters that need to be considered  with regards to the installation and operation of combined wind-solar systems

•Optimum design of a hybrid power generation system

•Optimum design of a pumped hydro installation

•Optimum management of thermal energy with the use of combined solar-thermal and geothermal systems

•Knowledge of main building-integrated applications of renewable energy sources 

•Familiarization with electrical and thermal energy storage technologies

•Application of established methodologies for the design of hybrid systems

•Analysis of issues concerning the techno-economic feasibility, funding resources and positive environmental impact assessment for energy saving systems

•Selection of the most appropriate energy storage technology based on the requirements of each application

•Realization of a case study concerning implementation of an energy storage system

•Energy consumption analysis

•Assessment of energy saving potential and development of energy saving recommendations 

Module Description

The main course sections include:

 

Theory: Greek energy system and remote consumers. Cost of electricity production in the Greek region. Operation of autonomous, hybrid power generation systems. Problems of collaboration between thermal units and wind power. Advantages and disadvantages of interaction between thermal units and wind turbines. Sizing of hybrid power systems using wind power and thermal power generation. Main energy storage technologies. Hybrid wind-diesel systems. Hybrid PV-diesel systems, with or without energy storage. Wind-PV-diesel systems. Hybrid systems of space and water heating. Hybrid systems for the coverage of thermal loads (solar energy, biomass, geothermy). Techno-economic evaluation of hybrid energy systems. Environmental-social benefits of hybrid energy systems. New technologies for hybrid power systems. Energy and cost savings with hybrid power systems. Energy saving in the residential and the building sectors. Energy saving in the industrial, agricultural and transportation sectors. Legislation and finance schemes. Third party contracts for energy saving. Energy and cost savings in the industrial, agricultural and transportation sectors. Co-generations methods. 

 

Laboratory: Sizing of wind-diesel hybrid systems. Study of the collaboration problems between wind power and thermal power. Evaluation of energy storage systems. PV-thermal hybrid systems with or without energy storage. Wind-PV-diesel systems. Techno-economic evaluation of hybrid energy systems. Assessment of energy saving potential and development of energy saving recommendations. 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

The final mark is different for the theory and for the lab part of the course, using the following weight factors. 

 

Theory evaluation:

•Written exam dealing with the solution of exercise and/or the answering of short questions (100%)

 

Lab evaluation:

•Written exam (60%)

•Semester assignment (40%) 

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.J.K. Kaldellis, K.A Kavadias, 2001, "Laboratory Applications of Soft Energy Resources", Ed. Ath. Stamoulis, ISBN: 960-351-345-8.

2.J.K. Kaldellis, K.A. Kavadias, 2005, "Computational Applications of Soft Energy Applications (Wind Energy - Small Hydropower)", Ed. Ath. Stamoulis, ISBN: 960-351-631-7.

3.J.K. Kaldellis, G.C. Spyropoulos, K.A. Kavadias, 2007, "Computational Applications of Soft Energy Applications (Solar Radiation - PV Installations - Solar Thermal Systems)", Ed. Ath. Stamoulis, ISBN: 978-960-351-686-6.

4.Papantonis D., 2001, "Small Hybdropower Plants", Ed. Symeon/9607888235.

5.Sayigh Ali, 2012, "Comprehensive Renewable Energy", Elsevier B.V., ISBN 978-008-087-872-0

6.Kaldellis J.K., 2010, "Stand-alone and hybrid wind energy systems. Technology, energy storage and applications", Woodhead Publishing, ISBN 978-1-84569-527-9.

7.Molly J.P., 1990, "Windenergie", Verlag C.F. , ISBN 3788072695

8.Duffie J.A., Beckman W.A., 1991, "Solar Engineering of Thermal Processes", John Wiley & Sons, New York , ISBN 0471510564

9.Hestnes A., Hastings S.R., Saxhof B., 1996, "Solar Energy Houses", James & James London, ISBN 1873936699

10.Hall E.R., Hobson P.N., 1988, "Anaerobic Digestion", Pergamon, ISBN 0080366341

11.Dickson M.H., Fanelli M., 1995, "Geothermal Energy", Unesco Engineering Series, ISBN 0471953660

12.Kapsali M., Anagnostopoulos J.S., Kaldellis J.K., 2012, "Wind Powered Pumped-Hydro Storage Systems for Remote Islands: A Complete Sensitivity Analysis Based on Economic Perspectives", Applied Energy, Vol.99, pp.430-444.

13.Kaldellis J.K., Zafirakis D., 2012, "Optimum Sizing of Stand-Alone Wind-Photovoltaic Hybrid Systems for Representative Wind and Solar Potential Cases of the Greek Territory", Journal of Wind Engineering & Industrial Aerodynamics, Vol.107-108, pp.169-178.

14.Kaldellis J.K., Zafirakis D., Kavadias K., 2012, "Minimum Cost Solution of Wind-Photovoltaic Based Stand-Alone Power Systems for Remote Consumers", Energy Policy, Vol.42, pp.105-117.

15.Kaldellis J.K., Zafirakis D., Kavadias K., Kondili E., 2011, "Optimum PV-Diesel Hybrid Systems for Remote Consumers of the Greek Territory", Applied Energy, Vol.97, pp.61-67. 

MANUFACTURING PROCESSES

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Face to Face, Lectures and work in laboratory 
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 2

Laboratory, 3 

ECTS: 5.5 
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the module, the students are expected to:

•Describe the principal processes for shaping/ forming of mechanical components and systems assembly.

•Distinguish the physical mechanisms taking place during manufacturing processes: (a) deformation, (b) melting and solidification and (c) pressing and heating

•Identify the crucial parameters of shaping/ assembly processes via: (a) deformation (extrusion, forging, rolling, drawing, shearing, bending), (b) melting and solidification (casting, welding) and (c) pressing and heating (powder metallurgy).

•Design/ calculate based on norms/ requirements/ technical specifications, and assess the quality of final shaped products.

•Propose the optimum manufacturing process for components of targeted geometry/ shape per materials group.

•Evaluate/ rank various forming/ shaping solutions and select the optimum for a given case, based on techno-economic criteria. 

Module Description

Based on the distinct physical mechanisms that are taking place during the various shaping/ forming processes of mechanical components/ sub-assemblies/ assemblies, the theoretical part of the course covers the three main process categories:

1.Low- and medium-temperature plastic deformation processes. Concerns forming processes through plastic deformation of materials: (a) Bulk deformation, such as extrusion, forging, rolling, drawing and (b) Sheet metalworking, such as shearing, bending, deep drawing, as well as assembly processes, such as co-rolling, explosive compaction.

2.Melting and re-solidification processes. Concerns processes during which a final product or a total metallic construction are achieved through the total or partial melting and controlled re-solidification of raw material or individual parts, respectively. Such manufacturing processes include shaping of final products via casting in molds, e.g. lost wax, sand, permanent mold, centrifugal casting, as well as assembly of parts into metallic constructions via welding, e.g. resistance, electric arc, thermal, laser welding.

3.Compaction and heating processes, widely known as powder metallurgy techniques. Concerns techniques for shaping of multi-element materials for engineering applications of special requirements, taking place via solid- or liquid-phase sintering upon firing. 

For all above manufacturing processes, in addition to the fundamental mechanisms, the syllabus covers the relevant industrial equipment, the crucial operation parameters per technique and their influence on final product/ construction quality.

Finally, the relevant technical specifications and regulations for Non-Destructive Testing (NDT), safety and precaution measures are addressed. 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Multiple choice questions and questions with short responses

Oral exam Assignment 

Recommended or required Bibliography

Textbooks (in Greek)

•A. Andoniadis, «Manufacturing technology: Forming processes» (Eudoxus code: 18548665)

•G. Haidemenopoulos, «Introduction to Welding», (Eudoxus code: 18548847)

•A. Mamalis, «Materials Manufacturing Processes» (Eudoxus code: 30)

•Basic Mechanics Ι, Braun Herwig, (Eudoxus code: 14353)

•Aristomenis A.  (2012), Manufacturing processes, Volume Β’, Tziolas Publications, Athens (in greek) 

•Mamalis, A. (1990) «Technology of materials treatments," Volume IV: «Non-Conventional Treatments" Selki 4M Publications, Athens (in greek)

 

 

 

Relevant International Scientific Journals:

•International Journal of Meterial Forming

•Advances in Super-plasticity and Super-plastic Forming

•The International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology

•Welding International

•Science and Technology of Welding and Joining

•Powder Metallurgy

•Journal of Manufacturing Processes 

•Journal of Materials Processing 

•Technology CIRP  

SAFETY & ENGINEERING LEGISLATION

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Face to face 
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 2 

Class work/Workshop, 2 

ECTS: 4.5
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The course is Management / Economy, Legislation & Humanity Course (DONA) course focused on the object of Work Safety and Technical Legislation.

The scope of the course is the understanding and the interpretation of the regulations, and the legislation on occupational safety, as well as the introduction of basic concepts in orders the students to be able to distinguish, explain and assess the factors ensuring safety.

Finally, the aim of the course is to highlight  the importance of Work Safety by providing students with appropriate knowledge and skills  to solve safety problems and to implement the relative legislative framework

Upon successful completion of this course the student  will be able to:

•Understand the basics and individual characteristics of an accident at work.

•Acquire the knowledge related to the methods and techniques of tackling and managing the risk of accidents at work.

•Distinguish the main roles of the technical safety and occupational physician in a business.

•Use and apply the laws and provisions on safety at work.

•Assess and recognize the likelihood, frequency, and addressing the risks of accidents at work.

•Analyze and propose safety measures at work.  

Module Description

Course description:

           Theory

1.Introductory concepts

2.Statistical data on work accidents in Greece

3.Duties and rights of employer-employee 

4.The role of  safety technician

5.The doctor specialty at working stations

6.Hellenic Labour Inspectorate

7.Accident-First Aid

8.The microclimate at the workplace

9.Lighting

10.Fire and fire protection

11.Noise in the workplace

12.Risks of electricity

13.Chemical factors as occupational risk

14.Materials’ storage

15.Welding-Cutting metal

16.Work in heights

17.Lifting and cargo handling

18.Ergonomics

19.Monitors display

20.Radiation

21.Labels Signs

22.Rating occupational risks

Exercises.

Health and Safety Exercises 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination: 100%

Optional job preparation and presentation of up to 20%, less than the proportion of written examination. 

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Papakonstantinou K. – Mpelias X. ,2007, Hygiene and work safety , protection of environment , publications Rosili, ISBN 978-960-89407-0-3 ,Athens (in Greek).

2.Zogopoulos E. , 2004, Hygiene and work safety ,publications Klidarithmos, ISBN 960-209-713-2, ISBN-13 978-960-209-713-7, Athens (in Greek).

3.Raafat H.M.N. ,1981, Risk Assessment and Machinery Safety ,Aston University , U.K. 

4.Raafat H.M.N. ,1995, Risk Assessment Methodologies .Health and Safety Unit , Aston University , U.K. 

5.Gobba F., Cavalleri A. 2003,Color vision impairment in workers exposed to neurotoxin chemicals. Neurotoxicology , 24: 693-702 (Review)

6.Hengstler JG., Bolm-Audorff U., Faldum A., Janssen K., Reifenrath M., Gotte W. et al.,2003, Occupational exposure to heavy metals: DNA damage induction and DNA repair inhibition prove co-exposures to cadmium, cobalt and lead as more dangerous than hitherto expected. Carcinogenesis , 24: 63-73

7.Hum L., Kreiger N., Finkelstein MM. ,2004,The relationship between parental occupation and bone cancer risk in offspring. Int J Epidemiol 1998, 27: 766-771

8.Jacquet P. Sensitivity of germ cells and embryos to ionizing radiation. J Biol Regulat Homeost Agents , 18: 106-114 (Review)

9.Makowiec-Dabrowska T., Hanke W., Radwan-Wlodarczyk Z., Koszada-Wlodarczyk W., Sobala W. Working, 2003,condition of pregnant women. Departures from regulation on occupations especially noxious or hazardous to women. Md Polish , 54: 33-43

 

Internet sites . 

10.Hellenic Institute for Occupational Health and Safety (EL.IN.Y.A.E.):  http://www.elinyae.gr 

11.http://www.osh.gr

12.European Agency for Safety and Health at Work:  http://osha.eu.int

13.International Labour Organization:  http://www.ilo.org 

14.European Commission. Employment and Social Affairs:   http://www.europa.eu.int/comm/employment_social/index_en.htm

15.National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (USA):  http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/homepage.htm. 

TECHNOLOGY ADVANCES IN INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures, laboratories. 
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 2

Laboratory, 2 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

 

This course targets on one side to the in-depth knowledge of Internal Combustion Engines (ICE) operation and on the other side to get students familiar with the technological challenges involved, and the recent technological advances on this field, which aim to the improvement of the efficiency and the reduction of the tailpipe engine emissions.

 

Upon completion of the course, students will able to:  

1. Have an in-depth knowledge of the operation of Internal Combustion Engines (ICE).

2. Calculate piston position – velocity – acceleration.

3. Calculate the forces from gas pressure and mass inertia to the kinematic mechanism.

4. Identify cranks arrangement in the crankshaft and the firing order of a multi-cylinder engine.

5. To calculate the momentary crankshaft torque for single–cylinder, multi–cylinder and V engines.

6. Understand the balancing of the inertia forces and torques of single–cylinder and multi–cylinder engines.

7. Knowledge about the recent technological advances of direct injection Otto and common rail Diesel engines, and how those affect the efficiency and emissions.

8. Knowledge about EU emission regulations and modern aftertreetment technologies.

9. Understanding the control systems of modern ICEs. 

Module Description

1.Forces on the kinematic mechanism.

2.Forces from reciprocal and rotating masses and balancing of single–cylinder engine.

3.Crank placement in the crankshaft and firing order of multi–cylinder engine.

4.Balancing of inertia forces and torques of multi–cylinder engine.

5.Mixture preparation, combustion and emissions of modern direct injection gasoline engines.

6.Combustion and emissions of modern diesel engines.

7.Current trends in the aftertreetment technologies. 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Theory

•Final Written Examination.

 

Laboratory

•Group laboratory exercises.

•2 short examinations.

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Hasiotis P., 2013, Internal Combustion Engines Ι, Ion publications (in Greek).

2.Kiriakis N., 2006, Internal Combustion Engines, Sofia publications (in Greek).

3.Bohner Μ. et al., 2004, Automotive Technology Ι, Internal Combustion Engines, Ion publications (in Greek).

4.Rakopoulos C.D., 1996, Principles of Internal Combustion Engines, Fountas publications (in Greek).

5.Heywood J.B., 1998, Internal Combustion Engines Fundamentals, McGraw Hill.

6.Lumley J.M., 1999, Engines, An introduction, Cambridge University Press, N. York.

7.Pulkrabek, W., 2003, Engineering Fundamentals of the Internal Combustion Engine, PrenticeHall.

8.Bosch Automotive Handbook - 8th Edition, 2011, SAE International.

9.C. Ferguson, Α. Kirkpatrick, 2008, Internal Combustion Engines, (μετάφραση), Εκδόσεις Giapoulis S. & A. - Kaizer. Ο.Ε. publications (translation in Greek).

10.Rakopoulos C.D., 2003, Internal Combustion Engines ΙΙ Fountas publications (in Greek).

11.Pulkrabek, W., Engineering Fundamentals of the Internal Combustion Engine, 2003, Prentice Hall.

12.Arcoumanis C, Kamimoto T., 2009, Flow and Combustion in Reciprocating Engines, Springer.

13.Mollenhauer K, Tschoke H, Handbook of Diesel Engines, Bosch, Springer, 2010.

14.Lecture notes (electronic form).

APPLIED FLUID MECHANICS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures, working groups, laboratory. 
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 2

Laboratory exercises, 2 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The course aims to provide the graduate with the knowledge and skills needed to be able to understand and solve problems of applied fluid mechanics found in different applications of mechanical engineering science.

Objectives of the course is to make students able to:

a) formulate the basic laws governing applied fluid dynamics and apply them to solve technical problems,

b) solve of internal and external flows problems and

c) use and choose measuring instruments for measuring flow quantities and

Upon successful completion of the course, the student will be able to:

•Use methodologies of dimensional and similitude for the design of experiments and the evaluation of the measurements.

•Compute the aerodynamic forces acting on bodies

•Compute the coefficient of friction and characteristic quantities of the boundary layer on surfaces that interact with the flow field.

•Analyze problems in time-varying flows

•Use the conservation equations of mass, momentum and energy for the analysis of one-dimensional compressible flow problems.

•Apply the necessary procedures for conducting laboratory activities and prepare a corresponding technical report.

•Analyze and present a study case (individual or in co-operation with fellow students) that may include computational and / or experimental section using computational and experimental fluid dynamics tools, combining information and communication technologies.

•Identify, organize and manage bibliographical sources and information from the internet.

•Use the training material as a basis for future self-education in the subject. 

Module Description

1.Dimensional analysis and similitude.

2.Inviscid flows.

3.Boundary layers.

4.One-dimensional compressible flows.

5.Unsteady flows.

6.Applications on the course subjects.

7.Laboratory exercises and case studies (for the theoretical part of the course). 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Language of evaluation: Greek and English (for Erasmus students).

Ι. Theoretical part (60%): Midterm Evaluation (40%) and written final examination (60%), that include:

oShort answer questions (20%)

oProblem solving (80%)

ΙΙ. Laboratory part (40%): Individual or / and team (3 students) essay/report (40%) and written or oral or presentation for each lab exercise and study case (60%).

 

The subjects of the written examination and their answers are posted on the course asynchronous e-learning platform and are accessible by the students attending the course. 

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Cengel Y., Cimbala J., Fluid Mechanics: Fundamentals and Applications, McGraw Hill; 3rd edition, 2013.

2.Munson B.R., Rothmayer A.P., Okiishi T.H. and Huebsch W.W., Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics, Wiley; 7th edition, 2012.

3.White F., Fluid Mechanics, McGraw-Hill; 7th Edition, 2010. 

MACHINE DYNAMICS - VIBRATIONS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Face to face  
Weekly Hours: Lectures, 4 
ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

 

The course aims to introduce students to Kinetics and Dynamics and the modeling of Dynamic Systems.

 

Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:

•Study the Kinetics fundamentals

•Recognizes the normal mechanical dynamic systems.

•Understand the structure.

•To analyze and dynamic modeling mechanical systems.

•Modeling dynamic mechanical devices with elements of concentrated properties.

•Evaluates and improves dynamic systems.

•Have  introductory knowledge in Mechanical Vibrations 

Module Description

1  Introduction

2. Kinetics of absolutely solid body.

3. Dynamic system with one degree of freedom

4. Dynamic system with multiple degrees of freedom

5. Mechanical Vibrations

6. Mathematical modeling of dynamic systems

7. Applications of Machine dynamics

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination: 70%

 

Group project

 

with Oral presentation:      30% 

 

Recommended or required Bibliography

•Natsiavas S.: «Oscillations of Mechanical Systems», Ziti Publications,  Thessaloniki 2001.(in Greek)

•F.P.Beer, E.R.Johnston, P.J.Cornwell : «Vector Mechanics for Engineers» Dynamics 9th Edition.

•Bouzakis Κ.: «Vibrations & Machine Dynamics», Ziti Publications,  Thessaloniki 2011. (in Greek)

•Κanarachos A. & Antoniadis J. «Machine Dynamics», Papasotiriou Publications, Athens 1998. (in Greek) 

MECHATRONICS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Face-to-face, laboratories  
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 2

Laboratory, 2 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The course is an introduction to the concepts of mechatronics for mechanical engineers with emphasis on technological applications. The theory focuses on the elements of a mechatronic system.

Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to: 

• Evaluate the multidisciplinary system design through the example of Mechatronics and its applications.

 • Known the physics that governs the components of a mechatronic system and how sensors collect information.

• Analyze the benefits and risks of adapting mechatronic subsystems in general engineering, production machines and vehicles.

• Design and construct a mechatronic system initially on a computer and subsequently real model 

Module Description

Introduction to Mechatronics

•Energy transformers-Actuators 

•El. Machines, DC motors, step motors, servomotors

•Microcontrolers

•Control and programming of mechatronic systems

•Semiconductors and semiconductors devices

•Micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS)

•Measurements- Sensors

•Mechatronics applications

•Mechatronic car applications (sensors, ctuators, ABS, ESP, Drive by wire, Steer by wire, Brake by wire) 

 

Laboratory training of students carrying 13 laboratory exercises focused on the design, programming and construction of mechatronic systems. 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination: 60%

Laboratory exercise: 40%

Recommended or required Bibliography

 

 

  • S. Alatsathianos “Introduction to Mechatronics and embedded systems” (in greek) ISBN: 978-960-92596-2-0 
  • Nesculescu D., “Mechatronics”, Publisher Tziolas, 2011 ISBN: 978-960-418-280-0 (in greek)
  • D.M. Auslander and C.J. Kempf, " Mechatronics: Mechanical System Interfacing ", Publisher NTUA University Press 1998. (in greek) 

 

CNC MACHINE TOOLS - CAM

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:

Face to face

Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 2 

Laboratory Work, 2 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

 

When the module ‘CNC Machinetools’ has been completed, students will be able to:

 

•Evaluate and recognize the usefulness of CNC multiaxis machinetools

•Calculate the best tool path of the cutting tool

•Calculate cutting characteristics, such as federate and cutting speed

•  Design and control EIA/ISO code (G/Μ) programmes

Module Description

INTRODUCTORY ELEMENTS

•Analytic geometry

•Definition and historical development of numerical control

 

NUMERICAL CONTROL SYSTEMS

•Definition and historical development of numerical control

•Technology development from NC to CNC and DNC

•Where CNC machine tools are used

•Introduction to the Orthogonal Cartesian coordinate system for CNC

•Machine tool axis definition

•CNC of three, four and five axis

•Cutting tool path coordinates calculation (for milling)

•Cutting tool path coordinates calculation (for turning)

•Accuracy, resolution and repeatability

•Control systems with the ability of linear interpolation

•Linear and Circular interpolation

•Classification of machine tools based on the abilities of the control system used

•Spindle speed control

•Movement and speed control of the milling machine table or of the lathe tool turret

•Programming through codes

•APT programming language

•Tool length and tool diameter compensation

•Parts Loading and Fixturing systems for machining items

•Rotating table

 

“EIA/ISO” CODES EXPLANATION / EXAMPLES

•“G” & “Μ” codes for milling

•“G” & “Μ” codes for turning

CALCULATION OF THE BEST MACHINING CONDITIONS

•Cutting speed for milling and turning

•Federate in mm/rev and mm/min

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Solving problems, assignment  

Recommended or required Bibliography

• Skittides, Ph. (2000) "Fundamentals numerical control machine tools and CNC programming", Volume A, Modern Publication, Athens (in greek)

 

Scientific Papers:

•Robotics and Computer-Integrated Manufacturing

•CIRP Journal of Manufacturing Science and Technology

•International Journal of Manufacturing Research

•International Journal of Precision Engineering and Manufacturing

•Journal of Intelligent Manufacturing

•International Journal of Materials and Product Technology 

ELECTRIC MACHINES - POWER ELECTRONICS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures and exercises, face-to-face. 
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 2

Laboratory, 2 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, students will have:

1.Knowledge of the fundamental principles of the different types of electrical machines.

2.Knowledge of the electrical and the mechanical parameters of a motor control system.

3.Knowledge of working principle and applications of power electronics.

4.Ability to design Power Electronics systems.

 

More specifically:

1.Be able to understand the operation of electrical machines.

2.Be able to select the appropriate types of electric  machines based on their characteristics and the specific application requirements.

3.Be able to select the appropriate types of diodes and thyristors  based on their characteristics and the specific application requirements.

4.Be able to analyze, design and implement rectification circuits, smoothing and stabilizing the supply voltage. 

Module Description

A. THEORY

The theory part of the course consists of the following modules:

  1st Module:Basic principles of Physics 

  2nd Module:Electromechanical energy conversion

  3th Module:Transformers

  4th Module:DC Generators and  DC Motors

  5th Module:Alternative current motors

  6th Module: Power Electronics circuits

  7th Module:Single-phase and three-phase uncontrolled rectifiers. 

  8th Module:Single-phase and three-phase controlled rectifiers.

 

B. LABORATORY

The Laboratory part of the course consists of the following separate modules:

1st Module:Information and Familiarization with the Lab and Equipment - Lab Regulations

2nd Module:Transformers

3rd Module:DC Generators

4th Module:DC Motors

5th Module:Diodes

6th Module:Thyristors

7th Module:Single-phase uncontrolled rectifiers

8th Module:Single-phase controlled rectifiers 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Evaluation Language : Greek

 

Theory

Final Written Exams: 100%

 

Laboratory

Final Written Exams:: 70%

Team laboratory exercise report : 30%

 

The grade of the course is

60% x Theory + 40% x Laboratory grades 

Recommended or required Bibliography

[1]Α. Fitzerald, C. Kingsley, S. Umans, "Electric Machinery", Mc Graw-Hill, 4th Edition, 1983.

 

[2]D. Zorbas, "Electric Machines", West Publishing Company, 1st  Edition, 1989.

 

[3]N. Mohan, T. Undeland, W. Robbins. "Power Electronics", John Wiley & Sons, 2md Edition, 1995.

 

[4]Π. Β. Μαλατέστας,  "Ηλεκτρικές Μηχανές ", Εκδόσεις Τζιόλα, 2013

 

[5]Π. Β. Μαλατέστας, "Ηλεκτρομηχανικά συστήματα μετατροπής ενέργειας", Εκδόσεις Τζιόλα, 2013 

6th Semester

POWER STATIONS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Face to Face 
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 2

Class work, 1

Laboratory, 2

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The course is a specialty course in the subject of power plants.

 

This course aims at understanding the students on the applied technologies and operation of power plants. Described technologies traditional and modern associated with both the applied technology and in alternative energy sources. They analyze modern methods of producing electricity and heat in the rational use and energy saving. With the consolidation of these technologies and knowledge of the methods used, students solve problems related to the specialty of mechanical engineer.

 

Finally, the aim of the course is the understanding by students of the importance of energy production technologies and to solve related problems.

 

Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

• Know the different generation technologies

• Apply the thermodynamic laws and mass balances, momentum and energy in solving problems related to the steam power plant, the gas turbine installations, cogeneration systems and energy production from RES

• Evaluate the performance of power plants

• Analyzes and calculates the combustion and thermal performance exhaust on their way to the elements of steam

• Acknowledges the combined cycle units operating characteristics

• Does the importance of the positive impact of the use of RES in energy production 

Module Description

Theory:

1. Rankine Cycle (Simple – With superheating - With reheating – With regeneration)

2. Theory of combustion (General - Elemental burning - burning with excess air - fuel type - Calorific - Theoretical / Actual temperature combustion - burning Charts)

3. The water of steam coal (Basic concepts - quality water supply - water supply treatment systems - Sand filters - Softeners - Deionizers - Apalkaliotes - Decontaminators)

4. Steam installations (Heating networks - Power networks - chp networks - network of water / steam - Fuel network - Network of combustion air - exhaust)

5. Brayton Cycle (Simple - With regeneration - With reheating - With multiple compression and inter-cooling - Determination of the maximum work)

6. Combined Cycle Gas Turbine - Steam Turbine

7. Principles Hydro-Works-Maintenance Lifecycle

8. Principles of Wind Farms-Service-Lifecycle

9. Principles of Operation of Solar Power Plants (Solar Thermal, Photovoltaic, etc.)

10. Nuclear Facilities-Operating Principles

 

Class work 

Lab exercises:

1. Measurement of the steam quality

2. Measurement of the coefficient of thermal conductivity of thermal insulation materials

3. Measurement of the overall coefficient of heat exchangers parallel flow and counter flow

4. Measurement of thermal conductivity of metallic materials

5. Measurements of thermodynamic quantities in a pilot power plant with steam

6. Operating Cost Hydroelectric Projects

7. Energy Efficiency-Sitting of Wind Farms

8. Design thermal installations 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Theory

Final examination: 80%

Ιintermediate written examination: 20%

 

Laboratory 

Final examination: 50%

Ιintermediate written examination: 20%

Individual project: 30% 

Recommended or required Bibliography

P. Νikas, 2008, Applied Thermodynamics, Volume 1, Leader Enterprises Ltd, 

(in Greek)

Emman.. Kakaras, 2000, Power Stations, Founda, (in Greek)

Α. Polizakis, 2012, Gas Turbines Operation and Power Production, PowerHeatCool, (in Greek) 

E. Woodruff, H. Lammers, T. Lammers, 1998, Steam Plant Operation, McGraw-Hill 

 

 

 

-Related Scientific journals:

 

Renewable Energy

Fuel

Applied Energy

Energy

Energy Conversion and Management

Applied Thermal Engineering 

ADVANCED MATERIALS TECHNOLOGY

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures, laboratories 
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 3

Laboratory, 2 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the semester course, students would be able to:

1.Identify fundamentals on the microstructure and the subsequent physical, chemical and mechanical properties of the three families of non-metallic materials (polymers, ceramic and composites).

2.Identify the principal parameters determining the feasibility of synthesizing materials and producing relevant final products.

3.Distinguish the application field of various materials and comprehend their advantages and disadvantages with respect to their performance in a specific operational environment.

4.Develop crucial materials selection criteria per application.

5.Investigate and identify components’ failure root cause and propose best practice approaches for remediation. 

Module Description

The course consists of two equivalent modules providing up-to-date knowledge in the field of Advanced non-metallic Materials, that the Department’s graduate should master in order to select the proper materials for applications to be encountered in his/ her professional career.

The first module covers generic knowledge of advanced materials properties, synthesis and application-oriented selection. The relevant material families covered are:

•High Technology Polymers

•Engineering Ceramics

•Composite Materials

The module concludes with the development of materials selection methodology and materials’ maps approach.

The second module addresses applications of the materials above, specifically:

•Environmental and Energy related applications

•Amorphous alloys for Electromagnetic applications

•Low dimensional nano-composites and thin films for Optical and Electronic applications

•Porous materials for Environmental, Energy and Biomedical applications

•High technology polymers in advanced applications, e.g. organic photovoltaics, smart sensors, etc

This module concludes with the development of catastrophic failure analysis methodology and root cause determination.

 

The laboratory syllabus consists of three interconnected broad experimental groups of experimental exercises:

1.Materials’ synthesis via various techniques

2.Microstructure and properties characterization

3.Life-cycle assessment under quasi real operation 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Ι. Written mid-term exam (50%) including:

•Multiple choice questionnaire

•Short answer questions

•Problems solving

ΙI. Written final exam (50%) including:

•Multiple choice questionnaire

•Short answer questions

•Problems solving

ΙIΙ. Laboratory report in combination with bibliographic research/ synthesis (pass-not pass) 

Recommended or required Bibliography

Textbooks (in Greek)

•D. Pantelis, “Non-metallic Engineering Materials”, Eudoxus code: 9707

•M. Ashby, H. Shercliff, D. Cebon, “Materials: Engineering, Science, Processing and Design”, Eudoxus code: 12534905

•W.D. Callister, “Materials Science and Technology”, Eudoxus code: 18548824

•Teaching notes

 

Relevant Scientific International Journals

•Materials Science and Engineering A, B, C

•Metallurgical Transactions

•Acta Materialia

•Journal of Alloys and Compounds

•Materials and Design

•Engineering Failure Analysis

•Journal of Failure Analysis and Prevention 

AIR POLLUTION - AIR POLLUTION CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures and exercises, face-to-face.  
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 2

Laboratory Exercises, 2

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The specific course is an introduction to basic concepts of air pollution, pollution control and abatement technologies, quality of atmospheric indoor and outdoor environment, etc. As the time passes, the courses deepen in more specialized knowledge and concepts that require ability and skills development from the students, both understanding and use of new technologies.

The courses deal with the problems (directly and indirectly) that affect the people due to air pollution (adverse health effects, adverse constructions effects, etc) as well as to the actions to manage these problems. This course is also a technological analysis on issues and problems related to air pollution.

The aim of the course is the understanding of the importance of the quality of the atmospheric environment, the concepts of air pollution control and abatement technologies, and the development of an ecological consciousness, a consciousness that is closely linked to environmental protection, a potentially active and thoughtful citizen and scientist.

 

Upon completion of the course, students will be able to: 

1.They have acquired the knowledge and the understanding of issues related to air pollution and the quality of the atmospheric environment in general. Be able to describe relevant concepts and to identify the causes-sources that cause problem in the quality of the atmospheric environment.

2.Be able to perceive, interpret and clearly explain issues related to air pollution, to generalize the problem, to correctly appreciate in order to make right conclusions.

3.Be able to use all the concepts related to air pollution, to provide new calculations, to be able to correctly classify the causes of the various problems and generate new knowledge, while gaining implementation experience.

4.To have the ability to analyze the problems of air pollution and degradation of the atmospheric environment in probably components so that they can combine, design, develop and implement both old and innovative technologies in order to tackle these problems.

5.Be able to revise old views related to air pollution and its treatment, so they can create new knowledge. Also, be able to compose and organize working groups and propose solutions.

6.Have a proven critical ability so they can compare and evaluate different statements on the quality of the atmospheric environment (for example, high concentrations of particulate matter from anthropogenic activities and dust transport from the Sahara-Sahara Dust event).

7.Be able to participate in measuring-experimental procedures. Be able to know to handle suitable measuring devices and also to be able to evaluate the measurements results in order to judge situations correctly, proposing in each case the appropriate solution.

8.Be able to work with their fellow students, to create and present both at individual and group level a case study from its initial stages up to the final evaluation and finally to be able to propose new ideas and solutions. 

Module Description

Theory

The core modules of the course include:

 

1. Composition and structure of the atmosphere-atmospheric boundary layer

2. Atmospheric chemistry-atmospheric pollutants

3. Emissions of gaseous and particulate pollutants in the atmosphere

4. Methods for air pollution measuring and monitoring technologies

5. Modern air pollution abatement technologies in power generation

6. Air pollution abatement technologies in the transport sector

7. Industry and air pollution

8. Houses-central heating and air contaminants

9. Technologies and equipment addressing air pollution problems in industry, district heating systems, power generation, etc.

10. Processing, analysis and presentation of air pollution data

11. Indoor Air Quality

12. Human thermal comfort-discomfort and microclimate

13. Decision making and strategies in order to address the atmospheric-environment degradation problems.

 

 

 

Laboratory

The workshop includes the following laboratory exercises:

 

1. Air pollutant concentration units

2. Study, statistical analysis and treatment of carbon monoxide concentrations (CO)

3. Study, statistical analysis and treatment of sulfur dioxide concentrations (SO2)

4. Study, statistical analysis and treatment of nitrogen dioxide concentrations (NO2)

5. Study, statistical analysis and treatment of ozone concentrations (O3)

6. Study, statistical analysis and treatment of particulate matter (PM10) concentrations 

7. Air Pollution Indices

8. Wind Energy Effects on air pollution dispersion - air pollution Model ATDL

9. Influence of catalytic converters in vehicles to reduce air pollution

10. Indoor air quality measurements

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Language of evaluation: Greek and English for ERASMUS students.

 

Theory (60%):

•Final written examination: 80%

•Interim exams (advance): 20%

 

Laboratory (40%):

•Weekly laboratory homework-exercise (50%)

•Weekly written examination (30%)

•Team biannual work (20%) with experimental and theoretical part, on the quality of internal atmospheric environment buildings 

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Lazaridis M. (2010). Atmospheric pollution with meteorological elements. Tziolas publications, ISBN 978-960-418-246-6, Thessaloniki, Greece (in Greek)

2.Triantafillou A.G. (2004). Air pollution-Atmospheric Boundary Layer- Modern Measurement Techniques. TEI of Western Macedonia publications, ISBN 960-90103-1-8, Kozani, Greece (in Greek)

3.Gentekakis J. (2010). Air Pollution: Impacts, control and alternative technologies. Klidarithmos publications, ISBN: 978-960-461-394-6, Athens, Greece (in Greek)

4.Kaldellis J., Chalvatzis K. (2005). Environment and Industrial Development: Sustainable development and Air Pollution. A. Stamoulis publications, ISBN 960-351-589-2, Athens, Greece (in Greek)

5.Burden F.R., Foerstner U. and McKelvie I.D. (2002). Environmental Monitoring Handbook.  ISBN: 9780071351768, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc

6.Lodge J.P. (1998). Methods of air sampling and analysis. 3rd Edition, ISBN 0-87371-141-6, Lewis Publisher, New York, USA 

7.Boubel R.W., Fox D.L., Turner B.D. and Stern A.C. (1994).  Fundamentals of air pollution. 3rd Edition, ISBN 0-12-118930-9, Academic Press, Elsevier, USA

8.Wight G.D., 1994. Fundamentals of air sampling. ISBN 0-87371-826-7, Lewis Publisher New York, USA 

ENGINEERING ECONOMICS - PROJECT & OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures, laboratories  
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 2

Laboratory, 2

Tutorial, 2 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, students will: 

•Have acquired a very wide and useful knowledge and experience on the operation, economic analysis, feasibility and evaluation of enterprises and projects 

•They will be familiar with the methods and tools for Project Management.  

•They will understand the principles of the development and operation of an enterprise and be familiar with the business environment. 

•They will be able to make an economic analysis of an investment and employ concepts such as cash-flows, interests’ rates, evaluation criteria, like Simple PayBack Period, Rate-on-Return,  Net Present Value, Break-Even Analysis, all these, with special application on the design and operation of engineering projects. 

•They will be able to use methods for the business assessment, by reading and explaining balance sheets and Profit and Loss Accounts

•They will use the organisation of a project according to the Project Management principles, the basic network design principles, of Critical Path Method (CPM) 

•They will be provided with special skills on organising, planning and controlling a wide variety of technical plans. 

Module Description

•Part A: Operations Management

•Introduction to Operations Management.

•Various Legal Schemes for Enterprises.

•Differences between Enterprises and Organisations.

•Business Funding.

•Enterprises Siting.

•Organisational Schemes.

•Basic Economic figures for Enterprises. 

•Part B:  Engineering Economics 

•Basic Concepts - Business Plans - Feasibility Studies 

•Basic concepts of Engineering Economics- Business Plans - Feasibility studies. 

•Scope, objectives and contents. 

•Cost Analysis

•Cost significance, basic cost categories. Direct and indirect costs, fixed and variable costs. The definition and implementation of Break-Even Point. Sensitivity Analysis in Break-Even Calculations.

•Production cost, maintenance cost. Fixed investment cost and working capital. Methods and principles in depreciation. Estimation of production cost in an industrial facility. Examples.

•Investments' Evaluation 

•The significance of cash flow. The time value of money.  Basic criteria in investments' evaluation.  

•The PayBack Period (PBP), Return on Investment (ROI), Net Present Value (NPV) and Internal Rate of Return (IRR) and assorted drawbacks. Implementation issues. 

•Implementation and examples in the implementation of NPV, IRR, PBP, ROI.

•Practical examples in investment evaluation in the field of mechanical engineering.

•Financial Analysis of Enterprises 

•Reading and explaining balance sheets and Profit and Loss Accounts. The basic points for an engineering assessment. Basic financial indices, concepts and implementation issues. 

 

•Part C: Project Management 

•Basic Concepts in Project Management - The development of Project Network 

•Project Definition and basic parameters. Projects examples from various production sectors. 

•Events and Activities in a Project. 

•Basic concepts of Network Analysis.

•The construction of Project Network.

•The Critical Path Method. Critical Path and Critical Activities. 

•Earliest, Latest and Floating Times. 

•Project design and planning

•Basic Concepts in Project Management. The Significance of the WBS (Work BreakDown Structure). Examples in complex projects. 

•Project Planning and Scheduling.  

•Decreasing the total duration of the project. Financial implications. 

•Project staffing 

•The PERT technique 

•Case studies

•Organisation, planning and control of various projects (case-studies).

•The use of Project Management Software for project planning and control.   

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Lectures, Visits to companies, Case Studies and Seminars, Use of Software Tools 

Written examination, Case Studies and Micro-Projects

Team Work for Analysis of Business

 

Written examination: 60%

Laboratory exercise: 40% 

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Burke R.: Project Management Planning and Control. John Wiley, 1993 

2.Lewis J.: Fundamentals on Project management. AMACOM 2002

3.Burton V.: Project Management: Methods and Studies. North-Holland, Amsterdam, 1985 

4.Kerzner H.: Project Management: A Systems Approach to Planning, Scheduling and Control. Van Norstrand Reinhold, N.York, 1989 

5.Peters and Timmerhaus: Plant Design and Economics for Engineers, McGraw-Hill. 

6.Stewart, Wyskida, Johannes: Cost Estimator's Reference Manual, J. Wiley, 2nd Edition 

MECHANICAL FACILITIES

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 2

Class work/Workshop, 2 

ECTS: 4.5 
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The course is a specialty course with the subject of mechanical facilities.

 

This course aims at understanding and interpretation of mechanical facilities and introduction to students the basic concepts of these facilities, in order the students to  be able to distinguish, explain and assess the factors of the facilities and simultaneously  to apply new and innovative technologies.

Finally, the aim of the course is the understanding of the importance of mechanical facilities mainly in buildings and to provide the students with the appropriate skills in order to be able to solve related problems and implement energy-saving technologies.

 

Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

• Understand the basics and individual characteristics of Buildings mechanical installations.

• Acquire the knowledge based on methods and techniques of the study and management of mechanical installations and systems that are used to ensure  techno-economic results.

• Distinguishes the main roles in a real case or a case study and assess the role of stakeholders in implementing the system.

• Uses and apply the laws of thermodynamics, mechanics of fluids and heat transfer in order to identify key elements for an efficient system.

• Evaluate comparing different systems applicable to mechanical installations.

• Analyzes and calculates the basics and components of the plant.

• Co-operate with fellow students to create and present a plan in a case study involving the design and study of Building mechanical installations.

The course is a specialty course in the subject of Mechanical facilities.

Module Description

 

 

Theory

1. Plumbing installations for buildings (water - sewage).

2. Facilities natural gas and gaseous fuels.

3. Heating, refrigeration and air conditioning.

4. Fire protection, material behavior, fire detection, fire extinguishing systems and devices, automatic extinguishing systems, fire protection in boilers, tanks and industrial buildings.

5. Regulations and internal installations of buildings standards.

6. Studies of internal mechanical facilities buildings using national technical directives and use of computer packages.

 

Class work/Workshop .

 

Study Plumbing installations of cold tap water.

Study network piping gas up 1 bar.

Study fire extinguishing systems and devices.

Study plumbing installations of sewage.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination: 100%

Optional job preparation and presentation of up to 20%, less than the proportion of written examination. 

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Charonis P., 2003, Mechanical Facilities for buildings, Volume A, Synchroni Ekdotiki LTD publications, ISBN 9608165-53, Athens (in Greek).

2.Charonis P., 2003, Mechanical Facilities for buildings, Volume B, Synchroni Ekdotiki LTD publications, ISBN 9608165-53, Athens (in Greek).

3.Papanikas D.G,2007, Natural Gas technology, Volume I , 2nd edition φυσικού αερίου, Media Guru ,M & Fr. Papanika Editions ,ISBN 978-960-88598-1-4,Athens , Greece (in Greek).

4.Machias A., 1997, Electromechanical Facilities, Machias A.  Publications (in Greek).

5.Stein B.-Reynolds J., Mechanical and electrical equipment for buildings, J. Wiley publications, 1392 ISBN 0-471-52502-2.

6.Sage K., 1971, Handbook of Indoor facilities, Volume 2, Giourdas publications, Athens (in Greek).

7.Schulz K., 1992, Household Sanitary Installations, Giourdas publications, Athens (in Greek).

8.Tchobanoglous G, Kreith F,2002, Handbook of Solid Waste Management, McGraw Hill Professional .

9.Brickle S, Harterich M,Jungmann F ,  1999, Thermo-hydraulic Installations , ION publications, ISBN 960-331-233-9, ISBN-13 978-960-331-233-8, Athens (in Greek).

10.Eckenfelder HC, 2000, Industrial Water Pollution Control, McGraw Hill.  

PRODUCTION & MAINTENANCE MANAGEMENT

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures, laboratories  
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 2

Tutorial, 2

ECTS: 4.5 
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, students will: 

•Have acquired the necessary knowledge and experience in order to recognize the production management and planning problems

•be able to select and use the most appropriate methods and tools for the solution of problems related to materials management, production planning, shop floor scheduling, inventory control 

•be able to use the very useful MRP algorithm for the organization of the production 

•be able to develop the cost function for materials management 

•be able to use simple MRP software and building on that to proceed to more complicated production systems  such as planning and control methods, inventory and stock control etc. as well as the most modern production planning and management systems such as ERPs.

•Know and be able to work on the basic concepts of maintenance, the parameters affecting the maintenance cost and its identification, the concepts of preventive and predictive maintenance, as well as acknowledgment of the most widely applied maintenance management software tools. 

Module Description

•Introduction to the industrial systems, the efficiency and productivity concepts. 

•Various production structures. 

•Continuous production, Job Shop, Batch Production, Line or Flow Production. 

•Production Capacity. Production Resources. 

•Basic parameters of the Production Planning Problems. 

•Production Systems’ Organisation. Material Requirement Planning (MRP). 

•Bill of Materials. Master Production Schedule. 

•Suitability of the MRP Systems. 

•Manufacturing Resource Planning (MRP II) 

•Case studies. 

•Detailed Production Scheduling. 

•Materials Management. 

•The importance of materials in the competitiveness of industries. 

•Deterministic and stochastic Materials Management Models. 

•Fixed Order Quantity System. 

•Periodic Order Quantity Systems. 

•Discount Systems. 

•Suitability of various Materials Management Systems. 

•Case studies and applications.

•Basic concepts of Maintenance Management.

•Maintenance planning and cost. 

•Preventive and predictive management.

•Case studies and software tools. 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination, case studies and team work assignment

 

Written examination: 60%

Laboratory exercise: 40% 

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Gaither, N. (1996). Production and operations management. Belmont, Calif.: Duxbury Press. 

ELEVATING & TRANSPORTING MACHINES

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  
Weekly Hours: Lectures, 4 
ECTS: 4.5 
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

 

The course aims to introduce students study the main Elevating and transporting machines

 

Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:

 

•Select the appropriate transport or lifting machine for each application.

•Select and design the proper components that make up this device.

•Analyze the stress-strain state of each machine element under loading.

•Calculate the strength of each case study.

•Select materials and processing method of non-standard elements.

•To specify the conditions and operating parameters of each device.

•Make kinematic and dynamic calculations of the machines’ components.

•Predict potential failure conditions

•Study the safety of operation.

•Design and analyze Mechanical multiple-element arrangements.

•Predict potential failure conditions.

•Specify maintenance program. 

•Make damage assessmen.t 

Module Description

1.   Introduction

2.   Wire ropes

3.   Sheaves and Drums

4.   Typical elevators

5.   Wheels – Wheel tracks

6.   Typical transporting mashines

7.   Cranes

8.   Brakes - Braking Systems

9.   Conveyors  

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination: 100% 

Recommended or required Bibliography

•Stergiou J, Stergiou Κ.: “Elevating and Transporting Machines”. Sychroni Ekdotiki. Athens 2006.(in Greek) 

ENERGY IMPROVEMENT & CERITFICATION OF INDUSTRIAL & RESIDENTIAL SECTOR BUILDINGS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures, laboratories  
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 2 

Laboratory, 2

ECTS: 4.5 
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The objective of the module is the familiarization of students with issues relating to the rational energy use in the building sector and the theoretical approach/understanding of the natural mechanisms behind the operation of energy saving systems, as well as interventions of bioclimatic character. At the laboratory level, the students are trained in the use of commercial software for the estimation of energy consumption (e.g. cooling, heating, ventilation and air conditioning) and the application of energy saving measures, which they can also use in the future for the conduction of building energy audits in accordance with the Building Energy Efficiency Regulation in force. After successfully completing the module, the student will:

  • Have  gained a deep understanding of building energy consumption mechanisms
  • Have acquired the knowledge of the most significant characteristics of the Greek building sector. 
  • Have familiarized with the existing legislation concerning building energy efficiency requirements
  • Be in a position to apply established methodologies of energy consumption estimation
  • Be in a position simulate operation of typical buildings for the exact estimation of their energy consumption
  • Have familiarized with the established energy saving measures for the building envelope and the electromechanical equipment
  • Be in a position to apply different energy saving measures and also evaluate their energy and economic performance
  • Has familiarized with the use of commercial software for the energy study of buildings
  • Be in a position to conduct a complete energy study in order to improve the energy class of a typical building

Module Description

Theory: 

General information, regulations and legislation on energy audits and building energy efficiency; Instruments and equipment for the conduction of audits; Evaluation / estimation of electrical and thermal energy consumption, performance evaluation of electromechanical equipment in residential and other types of buildings; Bioclimatic design; Passive solar systems; Energy saving measures; Natural ventilation; Energy audit and building certification with the use of the appropriate equipment and software; Technical report for existing buildings’ energy audit and certification; Energy design of new buildings; Cost-benefit analysis of energy saving measures; Techno-economic evaluation of energy saving measures; Environmental gains of energy saving measures. 

 

Laboratory:

Introduction to the subject of building energy audits; legislation framework; current situation; Energy audits, professional rights, available equipment; Methodologies for the estimation of energy savings; Energy saving measures for buildings; European and international experience from the use of building energy efficiency software, presentation of the official Greek building energy efficiency software; Introduction to EPA-NR software, basic principles, presentation of a detailed energy audit/ energy simulation example concerning a block of flats with the use of EPA-NR. Assignment of the semester assessment “Energy Efficiency Certificate of an Existing Block of Flats – Techno-Economic Evaluation of Proposed Energy Saving Measures”. General revision and solution of exercises; Final exam. 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination: 60%

Laboratory exercise: 40%

 

Lab:

Final exam (60%) + semester assignment (40%)

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Bioclimatic design, Environment and Sustainability, E. Andreadaki, ISBN: 978-960-12-1470-2

2.Energy in Architecture, European Guidelines  for Passive Solar Buildings , Malliaris, ISBN: 960-239-242-8

3.Energy and Buildings Journal, Elsevier, http://www.journals.elsevier.com/energy-and-buildings 

TRANSFER PHENOMENA - AERODYNAMICS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures in class and laboratory experiments, with student participation 
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 2

Laboratory, 2 

ECTS: 4.5 
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The purpose of this introductory course is to provide to the students:

•A unified approach of momentum, heat and mass transport phenomena and their microscopic interpretation in the frame of statistical mechanics and the kinetic theory of gases. 

The corresponding general balance equations in differential and integral forms are developed and applied to problems involving simultaneously transport processes of momentum, heat and mass transfer, with emphasis on those for mass and combined heat and mass transfer. 

 

•An understanding of low speed aerodynamics to solve fundamental and practical problems. 

Upon the course completion the students will be able to:

•Identify and describe mechanisms of transport phenomena, present in given isothermal and non-isothermal, laminar and turbulent flow systems

•Establish and simplify appropriate conservation equations (the general differential equations and macroscopic balances) for steady and unsteady mass, momentum and heat transfer processes at microscopic and macroscopic level.

•Distinguish interrelations between the molecular, microscopic and macroscopic descriptions of transport phenomena.

•Apply the conservation equations to fundamental and practical problems of different complexity in fluid flow (momentum), heat and mass transfer.

•Apply the principle of geometric similarity and dynamic similarity to design scale-up or down experimental system to investigate mass, momentum and/or heat transport processes.

•Describe the fundamental aerodynamic and geometrical properties related to external flows over airfoils, wings, and bluff bodies 

•Calculate the aerodynamic forces and moments experienced by airfoils, wings and bluff bodies 

•Determine when to apply basic aerodynamic equations (such as Bernoulli’s equation, Laplace’s equation, etc.) to solve problems.

•Develop a working knowledge of experimental test facilities, techniques and equipment commonly used in the fields of experimental transport phenomena and aerodynamics, as well as, of relevant computer simulation software.

•Present data in an appropriate manner through the use of tables and graphs, compare experimental data to theoretical and numerical predictions, and communicate effectively in written form the results of an engineering experiment. 

Module Description

Theory:

1.Introduction to transport phenomena

2.Molecular transport mechanisms

3.Molecular diffusion coefficients

4.Mass transport phenomena

5.General transport property balances in differential and integral form

6.Dimensional analysis (analogies between heat, mass and momentum transport)

7.Introduction to boundary layers

8.Introduction to Aerodynamics

9.Aerodynamics of 2-D inviscid incompressible flows

10.Elements from the aerodynamics of an airplane (Incompressible flows over airfoils and finite span wings, Aerodynamic forces and moments)

11. Experimental Aerodynamics (Wind Tunnel Testing, Measurement Instrumentation, Scaling Effects, Wall Interference)

12.Introduction to car aerodynamics

Lab: 

To develop a student working knowledge of experimental test facilities, techniques and equipment commonly used in the fields of experimental transport phenomena and aerodynamics, as well as, of relevant computer simulation packages. 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Student evaluation language: Greek  (English for Erasmus students)

 

THEORY (60%):

Ι. Written Final Exam (60%) that consists of:

-Problems that lead to numerical results, however the emphasis is placed in the solution procedure 

-Comparative evaluation of theoretical concepts

ΙΙ. Midterm exams and (40%)

 

LAB (40%): 

Written and oral exams (60%)

Individual and group exercises and technical reports and memoranda on experiments (40%) 

Recommended or required Bibliography

TRANSPORT PHENOMENA:

1.Brodkey, R.S. & Hershey, H.C., 2013, Transport Phenomena – A Unified Approach, Tziolas Publications, Thessaloniki (in Greek).

2.Asimakopoulos, D., Ligeros, V., Arampatzis, G., 2012, Mass and Heat Transfer, Papasotiriou Publications, Athens (in Greek).

3.Markopoulos, I., 1997, Mass Transfer, University Studio Press (in Greek).

4.Bergman, T.L., Lavine, A.S., Incropera, F.P. and Dewitt, D.P., 2011, Fundamentals of Heat and Mass Transfer, 7th Edition, Wiley. 

5.Thomson, W.J., 2000,  Introduction to transport phenomena, Technology & Engineering

6.Bird, R.B., Stewart, W.E. and Lightfoot, E.N., 2002, Transport Phenomena, 2nd Ed., John Wiley & Sons, New York.

7.Welty, J.R., Wicks, C.E., Wilson, R.E. and Rorrer, G., 2008, Fundamentals of Momentum, Heat and Mass Transfer, 5th Ed, Wiley.

8.Mills, A.F., 2001, Mass Transfer, Prentice Hall, NJ.

9.Kessler, D.P., Greenkorn, R.A., 1999, Momentum, Heat, and Mass Transfer Fundamentals, Marcel & Dekker.

10.Deen, W.M., 2011, Analysis of Transport Phenomena, 2nd Ed. Oxford University Press, NY.

11.Bennett, C.O., Myers, J.E., 1988, Momentum Heat and Mass Transfer, 3rd Ed., McGraw-Hill International.

12.Tosun, I., 2002, Modeling in Transport Phenomena- A Conceptual Approach, Elsevier. 

13.Hauke, G., 2008, An Introduction to Fluid Mechanics and Transport Phenomena, Springer.

14.Plawsky, J., 2009, Transport Phenomena Fundamentals, CRC Press.

15.Truskey, G.A., Yuan, F., and Katz, D.F., 2010, Transport Phenomena in Biological Systems, 2nd ed., Pearson Prentice Hall.

16.Middleman, S., 1998, An introduction to mass and heat transfer: principles of analysis and design, Wiley.

17.Cussler, E.L., 1997, Diffusion-Mass Transfer in Fluid Systems, 2nd Ed., Cambridge University Press, NY.

18.Asano, K., 2006, Mass Transfer - From Fundamentals to Modern Industrial Applications, Wiley-Vch.

19.Benitez, J., 2009, Principles and Modern Applications of Mass Transfer Operations, 2nd Ed., Wiley.

20.Baehr, H.D., Stephan, K., 2011, Heat and Mass Transfer, 3rd Ed., Springer.

 

AERODYNAMICS:

21.Mpergeles, G., 1995, Aerodynamics of Subsonic Aircrafts, Papasotiriou Publications, Athens (in Greek).

22.Rosis, Κ., Ageridis, G., and  Mpergeles, G., 1993, Car Aerodynamics, NTUA (in Greek).

23.Abbot, I. and Doenhoff, A., 1959, Theory of Wing Sections,  Dover, 1959

24.Anderson, J.D., 2011, Fundamentals of Aerodynamics, 5th Ed., McGraw-Hill.

25.Anderson, J.D.Jr., 2008, Introduction to flight, 7th Ed., McGraw-Hill.

26.Anderson, J.D.Jr., 1999, Aircraft Performance and Design, McGraw-Hill. 

27.Barlow, J.B., Rae, W.H. Jr., and Pope, A., 1999,  Low-Speed Wind Tunnel Testing, 3rd Ed., Wiley.

28.Barnard, R.H., 1996, Road Vehicle Aerodynamic Design: An Introduction, 2nd Ed., Longman.

29.Barnard, R.H., and Philpott D.R., 1996, Aircraft flight: a description of the physical principles of aircraft flight, 2nd Ed., Addison-Wesley.

30.Bendat, J.S., and Piersol, A.G., 1986, Random Data: Analysis and Measurement Procedures, 2nd Ed., New York: Wiley.

31.Bertin, J.J., and Smith, M.L., Aerodynamics for Engineers, 4th Ed., 2002, Prentice-Hall.

32.Blevins, R.D., 1977, Flow Induced Vibration,  Van Nostrand Rheinold.

33.Flandro, G., McMahon, H., 2012,  Basic Aerodynamics - Incompressible Flow, Cambridge Press.

34.Goldstein, R.J. (Ed.), 1983, Fluid Mechanics Measurement 2nd Ed., Washington, D.C.: Hemisphere.

35.Hansen, M.O.L., 2008, Aerodynamics of Wind Turbines, 2nd Ed., Earthscan.

36.Hucho, W.H. (ed.), 1998, Aerodynamics of Road Vehicles: from fluid mechanics to vehicle engineering, 4th Ed., SAE International.

37.John, J.E.A., 1984, Gas dynamics, 2nd Ed., Allyn and Bacon.

38.Katz, J., and Plotkin, A., 2001, Low speed aerodynamics, 2nd Ed., Cambridge Univ Press.

39.Katz, J., 1995, Race Car Aerodynamics: Designing for Speed, R. Bentley.

40.Krause, E., 2005, Fluid Mechanics with Problems and Solutions, and an Aerodynamic Laboratory, Springer.

41.Kuethe, A.M., and Chow C.-Y., 1998, Foundations of Aerodynamics: Bases of Aerodynamic Design, 5th Ed., Wiley.

42.Lawson, T., 2001, Building Aerodynamics, Imperial College Press.

43.Saad, M.A., 1993, Compressible fluid flow, 2nd Ed., Prentice-Hall. 

44. Schlichting, H.  and Truckenbrodt ,  K.,  1979, Aerodynamics of the Airplane, McGraw Hill.

45.Sears, W.R., 2001, Introduction to Theoretical Aerodynamics and Hydrodynamics  - [D. P. Telionis, Editor], AIAA.

46.Shevell, R., 1989, Fundamentals of Flight, 2nd Ed., Prentice Hall. 

47.Smetana, F., 1997, Introductory Aerodynamics of Wings and Bodies: A Software-Based Approach, AIAA Education Series. 

48.Sovran, G. et.al. (eds), 1978, Aerodynamic Drag Mechanisms of Bluff Bodies and Road Vehicles, Plenum Press.

49.Steinle, F. and Stanewsky, E., 1982, Wind Tunnel Flow Quality and Data Accuracy Requirements, AGARD Rept. No. 184.

50.Stinton, D., 1998, The Anatomy of the Aeroplane, Blackwell Science.

51.Torenbeek, E., Wittenberg, H., 2009, Flight Physics, Springer.

52.Wong, J.Y., 2001, Theory of Ground Vehicles, 3rd Ed., Wiley. 

SURFACE ENGINEERING

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Face-to-face during lectures and laboratories 
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 2

Laboratory, 2 

ECTS: 4.5 
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the semester course, students would be able to:

1.Recognize the fundamental mechanisms related to surface quality and are activated during service of engineering systems in a given operational environment.

2.Identify the crucial parameters that influence the effectiveness of surface modification techniques.

3.Distinguish and evaluate the contribution of distinct mechanisms on the total performance of surfaces.

4.Comprehend the application field of various surface modification techniques and evaluate their advantages/ disadvantages.

5.Calculate the mechanical loading and/ or chemical environment during operation of materials’ surfaces of specific topography and inherent mechanical, physical and chemical properties.

6.Analyze the requirements imposed by a specific solution, in order to synthesize and propose alternative optimal scenarios.

7.Incorporate techno-economic criteria in the performance assessment of surface-modified components. 

Module Description

The syllabus includes three equivalent modules of up-to-date knowledge in the field of Surface Engineering, required from a graduate Mechanical Engineer during his/her professional career.

The first module concerns the fundamental mechanisms taking place during surface loading of moving engineering parts and assemblies and the basic parameters affecting tribo-systems functionality. The following topics are elaborated:

•Surface topography and micro-geometry of engineering surfaces, 2D and 3D relevant measuring techniques.

•Elastostatic approach (Hertz theory) for calculating the normal and shear stress fields across the contact surfaces.

•Friction leading to energy loss and subsequent Wear leading to mass loss.

The second module concerns approaches for reduction of energy loss and dimensional changes/ failure related to mass loss. In particular:

•Liquid lubrication (Stribeck curve: boundary, hydrodynamic, hydroelastodynamic regime) and application to journal and rolling bearings.

•Solid lubrication using powders of phyllomorphic materials, e.g. graphite and SiO2-based minerals, or surface layers, e.g. low-thickness metallic coatings of low yield stress.

The third module concerns surface modification techniques of metallic parts for the enhancement of their mechanical/ chemical surface properties to prolong the effective in-service lifetime of moving mechanical systems:

•Deposition techniques of thin coatings (PVD, CVD) for cutting tools and inserts, coatings of intermediate thickness (electrodeposition, colloidal and dip coating) and thick coatings (thermal spraying, arc welding).

•Surface layers modification techniques with and without chemical composition changes, e.g. shot peening, flame/ induction surface hardening and nitriding, nitrocarburising, boronising, respectively.

•Non-conventional modification techniques with the aid of high energy beams (electron, plasma, laser) and concentrated solar irradiation.

The laboratory part of the course includes twelve (12) practical exercises, covering all the topics described above. 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Ι. Written mid-term exam (50%) including:

•Multiple choice questionnaire

•Short answer questions

•Problems solving

ΙI. Written final exam (50%) including:

•Multiple choice questionnaire

•Short answer questions

•Problems solving

ΙIΙ. Laboratory report including short literature synthesis, processing and assessment of results obtained during laboratory experiments. 

Recommended or required Bibliography

Textbooks (in Greek):

•M. Ashby, H. Shercliff, D. Cebon, “Materials: Engineering, Science, Processing and Design”, Eudoxus code: 12534905

•W.D. Callister, “Materials Science and Technology” Eudoxus code: 18548824

•Instructor’s notes

 

Relevant International Scientific Journals:

•Tribology in Industry (open access)

•Wear

•Tribology International

•Tribology Letters

•Tribology Transactions

•Surface and Coatings Technology

•Thin Solid Films 

7th Semester

INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT OF ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures, working groups, laboratory. 
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 3

Laboratory exercises, 3

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The objective of the course is to enable students to compose individual knowledge of the various thematic and specialist fields of their up to now studies and propose a comprehensive solution to a design issue and implementation of a new mechanical product, an application, an integrated system. In this course the approach is comprehensive, that students will need in groups or individually to address all material issues, planning, organizing and implementing an engineering solution and simultaneously have and understanding of where and how each item contributes to the total problem. In addition, this course will help students very effectively in the preparation and presentation of their thesis, both in terms of approach methodology of a research - design team issue, and the exploration of literature, writing and presentation of a work.

Upon successful completion of the course, the student will be able to:

• Identify and analyze (holistic approach) any mechanical problem

• Use all the knowledge they have acquired from their studies to solve engineering problems

• Cooperate with other engineers using and composing knowledge and skills

• Participate in research-innovation efforts

• Forecast future technological developments

• Apply basic principles of engineering design methodology and research

• Implement an engineering / research work

• Design and implement an engineering solution

• Organize their works and present them in the audience 

Module Description

1.Establishment of-research teams

2.Knowledge composition for solving engineering problems

3.Engineering methodology

4.Research methodology

5.Selecting research topics - studies

6.Project planning and management

7.Literature review

8.Plagiarism and referencing

9.Selecting approach, techniques and research tools

10.What is research in technology

11.Research – Innovation – Application 

12.Technical provisions

13.Research proposal

14.How to plan / organize a research

15.Presentation of a study / research

16.Evaluation of a study / research work

Laboratory:

1.Select composite mechanical issue

2.Establishment of working groups (each group is supervised by a member of teaching staff)

3.Analysis and synthesis of a mechanical issue

4.Submission of technical report

5.Presentations 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Language of evaluation: Greek.

I. For the theoretical part of the course:

a. Evaluation through the presentation of the proposed integrated solution of the mechanical problem at the end of the course (20%).

b. Participation in work and field visits (20%)

c. Written final examination (60% or 100% for students who do not participate in the evaluations (a) and / or (b)). The written tests include short-answer questions (40%) and application problems (60%)

II. For the laboratory part of the course, implementation of team mechanical engineering project with the submission of the corresponding report.  

Recommended or required Bibliography

A)Course notes

B)Books in Greek: 

1.Φ.Σκιττίδης, Π.Κοίλιαρη, Εισαγωγή στη Μεθοδολογία Εκπόνησης Ερευνητικών Εργασιών Τεχνολογικής Κατεύθυνσης, Σύγχρονη Εκδοτική, Αθήνα 2006

C)Related articles from Journals

1.Kaldellis J.K., Kavadias K., Zafirakis D., 2012, "Experimental Validation of the Optimum Photovoltaic Panels' Tilt Angle for Remote Consumers", Renewable Energy, Vol.46, pp.179-191.

2.Kaldellis J.K., Spyropoulos G.C., Kavadias K.A., Koronaki I.P., 2009, "Experimental validation of autonomous PV-based water pumping system optimum sizing", Renewable Energy, Volume 34, Issue 4, April 2009, Pages 1106-1113

3.Kaldellis J.K., Zafirakis D., Kondili E., Papapostolou Chr., 2012, "Trends, Prospects and R&D Directions of the Global Wind Energy Sector", European Wind Energy Conference (EWEC-2012), April 2012, Copenhagen, Denmark.

4.Koutsogianni E., Skittides Ph., Kondili E., Kaldellis J.K., 2008, "Educational Opportunities and Business Prospects for the Renewable Energy Sector in Greece", SynEnergy Forum (S.E.F.) International Scientific Conference, May 2008, Spetses, Greece.

5.Καλδέλλης I., Βλάχος Γ., Κανελόπουλος Δ., 1993, "Έρευνα και Τεχνολογία. Καταγραφή και Αξιολόγηση της Δεκαετίας 1980-90", Δελτίο Πανελληνίου Συλλόγου Διπλωματούχων Μηχανολόγων-Ηλεκτρολόγων, Τεύχος 253, σελ. 11-18.

6.Καλδέλλης Ι.Κ., Κονδύλη Αιμ., 2008, "Η Συμβολή της Έρευνας στην Καινοτομία και την Ανάπτυξη της Τεχνολογίας. Η Περίπτωση της Ελλάδος", 20ο Εθνικό Συνέδριο της Ελληνικής Εταιρείας Επιχειρησιακών Ερευνών, Ιούνιος-2008, Σπέτσες-Ελλάς.

7.Κτενίδης Π., Καλδέλλης I., 1989, "Οι προοπτικές και η συμβολή των Ερευνητικών Ομάδων των ΑΕI στην Παραγωγικότητα και στην Ανταγωνιστικότητα της Ελληνικής Κατασκευαστικής Βιομηχανίας, στον Τομέα των Ανανεώσιμων Μορφών Ενέργειας, εν όψει του 2000.", Τεχνικό Επιμελητήριο της Ελλάδος, Β' Συνέδριο για τη Βιομηχανία-Προοπτικές της Ελληνικής Βιομηχανίας, Τόμος III, pp.401-413, Αθήνα. 

ENGINEERING DESIGN

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Face to Face 
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 2

Workshop, 4 

ECTS: 6.5 
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The course provides the student with the necessary methodological steps to find product design solutions on complex engineering problems. The student gets the theoretical background to the Engineering Design Methodology in order to provide the optimal design solution in a framework of contradictory requirements generated by technological, economical, environmental, legal and other factors.

Upon completion of the course the student will be able to 

•methodically approach the design problem in concrete predetermined steps

•analyze the Problem in individual Sub-Systems

•determine the Main- and Sub-functions in the Function-Structure of the product

•methodically search for working principles in a structured combination of intuitive and systematic procedures

•evaluate the working principles upon technical and economical criteria

•combine working principles into working structures

•develop the working structure into a final design solution

•correctly implement the basic engineering methodology rules to obtain, optimize and evaluate the final design solution

•collaborate in a team to implement the design methodology steps for a structured approach on solving a design problem

•analyze the state of the art on the design problem by determining, organizing and classifying scientific literature sources and internet information 

Module Description

1.Methodology steps in Engineering Design

2.Gathering information methods on a Design problem

3.Requirements list specification

4.Abstraction procedure to obtain the core design problem

5.Analyze the Problem in individual Sub-Systems

6.Function-Structure specification

7.Intuitive solution procedures (Brainstorming, Gallery method etc.)

8.Systematically search for design solutions principles through classification matrices

9.Systematically combine design solutions for each sub-function through combination matrices

10.Evaluate the working principles upon technical and economical criteria

11.Combine working principles into working structures

12.Develop the working structure into a final design solution

13.Embodiment design: Principles of Force transmission, Principles of task division, Principles of self-help design and stability. 

14.Guidelines for Embodiment design: Design for production/assembly/ergonomics, Design to allow Expansion/Creep/Relaxation. Detail Design. Basic engineering methodology rules to obtain, optimize and evaluate the final design solution

15.Case study: In class teamwork assignment to implement the Engineering Design steps upon obtaining the optimal solution on a complex engineering problem 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

1.Final Exam (70%) consisting of Engineering Design methodology analysis and its application on obtaining the optimal solution of a complex engineering problem

 

2.Teamwork Case Study (30%) consisting of implementing the Engineering Design steps upon obtaining the optimal solution on a complex engineering problem 

Recommended or required Bibliography

  • Stergiou K., Engineering Design, 2004. Sigchroni Ekdotiki Publications. (In Greek)
  • Pahl, G., Beitz, W., Feldhusen, J., Grote, K.H.: Engineering Design. A Systematic Approach. Springer Verlag, 3rd ed. 2007, XXI 617p. ISBN 978-1-84628-319-2
  • Ernst Eder W., Hubka V., Hosnedl S.: Design Engineering: A Manual for Enhanced Creativity. CRC Press 2007. ISBN: 1420047655
  • Roth, K.: Konstruieren mit Konstruktionskatalogen: Band 1: Konstruktionslehre. Springer 2000. ISBN-10: 3540671420
  • Ehrlenspiel, K.: Cost-Efficient Design. Springer 2007. ISBN: 0791802507 

REFRIGERATION TECHNOLOGIES

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Face-to-face  
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 2

Exercises, 1

Laboratory, 2 

ECTS: 6.5 
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The course is a specialty course in object technology cooling.

 

This course aims at understanding the students over to the relevant technologies to achieve the cooling associated with both the preservation of food and with comfortable living conditions. With the consolidation of these technologies and knowledge of thermodynamic laws, students solve problems related to the specialty of mechanical engineer.

 

Finally, the aim of the course is the understanding by students of the importance of cooling technologies and solving related problems.

 

Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

• Know the different cooling technologies to achieve

• Apply the thermodynamic laws to solve refrigerants

• Evaluate the performance of refrigerants

• Analyze and calculate the cooling load for cooling chambers

• Does the importance of addressing global warming and the ozone hole 

Module Description

Theory:

1. Basic concepts of refrigeration technology

2. Cooling vapor compression (Elementary refrigeration cycle - cycle with sub-cooling and overheating - multistage refrigeration cycle - Refrigeration cycle with "cascading waterfall» (cascade))

3. Refrigerants (Properties - Coding of refrigerants - Secondary refrigerants)

4. The "ozone hole" and refrigerants

5. "Greenhouse effect" and refrigerants

6. Measures to address the environmental impacts

7. Cooling gas compression (chilling the Stirling-Philips machine - Reverse cycle Brayton - Liquefaction of gases method Linde and Claude)

8. Cooling with two working media (cooling by absorption (absorption) - Cooling by adsorption (adsorption))

9. Cooling steam injection

10. Cooling without working media (Thermoelectric cooling - Cooling by demagnetization)

11. Cooling and freezing of food

12. Insulation of mechanical installations

 

Class work 

Lab exercises:

1. Refrigeration plant and components

2. Cooling unit with water-cooled condenser (laboratory device ERS-2)

3. Cooling chamber I (laboratory device SA300 / 026-SP5)

4. Cooling/air conditioning unit with heat pump (laboratory device T50.8DPC)

5. Car Air Conditioning (laboratory device ACT / 82)

6. Cooling chamber II 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Theory

Final examination: 80%

Ιintermediate written examination: 20%

 

Laboratory 

Final examination: 50%

Ιintermediate written examination: 20%

Individual project: 30% 

Recommended or required Bibliography

G. Alexis, 2007, Refrigeration Techniques, Stamoulis, (in Greek) 

Μ. Vrachopoulos, 2000, Cooling devices, ΙOΝ, (in Greek)

W.F. Stoecher, J.K. Jones, 1987, Refrigeration & Air Conditioning, McGraw-Hill

F.P. Incropera, D.P. DeWitt, 1996, Introduction to Heat Transfer, J. Wiley & Sons

 

-Related Scientific journals:

Renewable Energy

Applied Energy

International Journal of Refrigeration

Energy Conversion and Management

Applied Thermal Engineering

International Journal of Exergy  

ENGLISH TECHNICAL & TERMINOLOGY

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures in class, face-to-face, English Language Computer Laboratory   
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 1

Classwork/workshop, 2 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course students will be able to:

•Understand scientific texts relative to the field of Mechanical Engineering, either globally (global understanding) or thoroughly (scanning-thorough comprehension)

•Acquire the terminology and syntax of scientific texts through various methods and techniques

•Analyze the structure and organization elements of scientific speech on multiple levels (sentence, paragraph, text)

•Produce oral speech and construct written speech of multiple forms (instructions, description of components, functions and processes, essay writing, reports, professional mail etc.)

Specifically, students will be able to:

•Acquire and use technical vocabulary, terminology and structure connected to the field of Mechanical Engineering

•Extract specific information from texts about components, devices, structures, and processes

•Identify devices, components, structures, processes and explain their function

•Understand the structure and function of devices and components

•Recognize differences between types of devices and components

•Understand the relation between structures, components and processes

•Understand the features and technical specifications of different components and devices

•Describe devices, components, structures, and processes

• Discriminate between different types of processes 

Module Description

•Boiler operation

•Stationary/Moving Parts of an Engine

•Principles of an Internal Combustion Engine

•An Introduction to Tribology

•Lubricating Systems

•Fluid Heat Transfer

•Computer-aided Manufacturing – Computer Numerical Control

•Mechatronics

•Dc Generators

•Lathes

•Clean Coal Technology

•Flat Plate Collectors-Collecting the heat

•Solar Radiation-Solar Radiation Measurement

•Alternative Sources of Energy 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final examination: 100%

Individual project/paper : up to 20%, added to total score  

Recommended or required Bibliography

1Authentic Reading Texts

2E.A. Avallone and T. Baumeister, 1987, Mark's standard handbook for Mechanical Engineers, 9th edition 

3M.W. Zemansky,  1981, Heat and Thermodynamics, 6th edition 

4Robert L. Norton, 1998, Machine design, Ed. Prentice Hall

5CM and Johnson,  1989, General Engineering, Ed. Cassell. 

OPERATIONS RESEARCH - PRODUCTION SYSTEMS OPTIMISATION

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures, laboratories  
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 2

Tutorial, 3 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the module the students will be able to 

•Recognize the theoretical and practical problems that may be approached with optimization 

•Develop an optimization model for a practical problem 

•Be able to identify the software tools that could be useful for the solution of the optimization problem 

•Be familiar with decision making tools and techniques such as Linear Programming-LP, Mixed Integer Non-Linear Programming- MILNP, Non-Linear Programming- NLP

•Use the most widely known appropriate software applications (i.e. office SOLVER)

•Be able to  implement optimization methods and tools in energy systems

•Apply mathematical programming application for the analysis and optimisation of energy systems.

•Apply the Pinch Analysis method for energy saving 

•Familiarize themselves with energy audits in the industry and, in general, acquire knowledge and incentives for the development and operation of ESCOs that may be a very prosperous professional path for them.  

Module Description

•Theoretical and practical issues in decision-making

•The science and the art of modeling

•From the real problem to the mathematical mode

•Types of models

•LINEAR PROGRAMMING

•Introduction in Linear Programming (LP)

•Identification of LP problems

•The basic steps in developing LP models

•Various examples and Exercises of LP problems

•The solution of LP problems. The Simplex method, the graphical method and the use of LP software

•LP examples from the field of Mechanical Engineering

•Sensitivity analysis in LP

•Case studies

•INTEGER and MIXED INTEGER LINEAR PROGRAMMING

•The necessity of using integer variables

•The difficulty in solving Integer Programming problems

•The role of binary variables in solving decision - making problems

•Mixed Integer Linear Programming, modeling and solution methods

•Case studies

•Computational applications (EXCEL, LINDO)

•General revision in Mathematical Programming

•NETWORKS

•The significance and the practical implications of Network Analysis

•The Shortest Path Problem

•The Spanning Tree Problem

•The Maximal Flow Problem

•SPECIAL APPLICATIONS

•Other important aspects and problems of Operations Research

•Case studies

•Energy use in the Industry 

•Energy intensive industrial sectors 

•The concept and applications of energy efficiency 

•The basic objectives and ideas of the Optimisation

•Most widely applied optimization techniques  

•Energy Management 

•Energy Audits and Energy Management Systems 

•Pinch Technology 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination, case studies and team work assignment

 

Written examination: 60%

Laboratory exercise: 40% 

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Ahern, J. (1980). The exergy method of energy systems analysis. New York: Wiley. ISBN-13: 978-0471054948

2.Bejan, A., Tsatsaronis, G., & Moran, M. (1996). Thermal design and optimization. New York: Wiley. ASIN: B00E6TQVAY

3.Blank, L., & Tarquin, A. (2005). Engineering economy. Boston: McGraw-Hill. ISBN-13: 978-0073376301

4.Edgar, T., & Himmelblau, D. (1988). Optimization of chemical processes. New York: McGraw-Hill. ISBN-13: 978-0071004152

5.Hillier, F., & Lieberman, G. (2001). Introduction to operations research. Boston: McGraw-Hill. SBN-13: 9780071181631

6.Hodge, B. (1985). Analysis and design of energy systems. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall. ISBN-13: 9780135259733

7.Jaluria, Y. (1998). Design and optimization of thermal systems. New York: McGraw-Hill Co. ASIN: B008C1L4UE

8.Klemes, J. (2011). Sustainability in the process industry. New York: McGraw-Hill. ISBN-13: 978-0071605540

9.Ossenbruggen, P. (1994). Fundamental principles of systems analysis and decision-making. New York: Wiley. ISBN-13: 978-0471521563

10.Ravindran, A., Reklaitis, G., & Ragsdell, K. (2006). Engineering Optimization: Methods and Applications. Hoboken, N.J.: John Wiley & Sons. ISBN-13: 978-0471558149

11.Sahin, A. S. (2012). Modeling and optimization of renewable energy systems. Rijeka: InTech. ISBN-13: 978-953-51-0600-5

12.Stoecker, W. F. (1989). Design of thermal systems. New York: McGraw-Hill. ISBN-13: 978-0070616202

13.Sullivan, W. G., Bontadelli, J. A., & Wicks, E. A. (2000). Engineering economy. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

14.Sieniutycz, S., & Jezowski, J. (2009). Energy optimization in process systems. Amsterdam: Elsevier. ISBN-13: 978-0-08-045141-1

ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING - WASTE TREATMENT

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures, laboratories , distance learning methods, Laboratory Education using also the Lab’s infrastructure  
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 2

Laboratory, 2

Tutorial, 1

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, students will: 

•Have acquired an integrated knowledge for the waste sources and their impacts in the natural resources. 

•Be familiar with the waste impacts mitigation measures and, more specifically with the waste treatment techniques and waste management technologies. 

•Have acquired practical experience and insight, concerning the construction and operation of waste treatment processes and plants. 

•Know the professional prospects emerging from their involvement with the environmental engineering aspects and be able to extend their career horizon in that direction. 

Module Description

Basic Concepts

•Introduction- Course organisation and evaluation. The general idea of waste management.

•Waste generation sources.  Waste categories.

•The concept and the formal definitions of sustainability.

•Professional interests and field in the Waste Treatment. 

•Relevance to the Mechanical Engineering profession. 

Solid Wastes

•Basic characteristics of solid wastes. – the solid wastes’ management problem.

•Basic methods in solid waste management.  Disposal sites.

•Thermal treatment, comparative evaluation of different methods in solid waste management.

•Recycling of solid wastes- special applications. 

Water Resources Management - Waste Water Treatment

•The problem of water resources management. Importance of the problem for Greece.

•Basic methods of water supply in isolated areas. 

•Comparative evaluation and cost issues.

•Basic characteristics of waste water, properties and specifications.

•Water pollution sources.

•Basic methods and techniques in waste  management. 

•Municipal waste water treatment plants– industrial waste water.

•The biological treatment plants - Various physical and chemical processes.

•Basic mechanical equipment. 

•Basic issues in waste water plant operation. Reasons of malfunctioning. 

•Case studies from real (operating) plants.

Special Issues

•Economic data concerning waste management facilities’ implementation and operation.  Current status in Greece.

•Issues concerning waste management facilities operation and maintenance equipment. 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination: 60%

Laboratory exercise: 40% 

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Kreith, F. and Tchobanoglous, G. (2002). Handbook of solid waste management. New York: McGraw-Hill

2.Eckenfelder, W. (2000). Industrial water pollution control. Boston: McGraw-Hill.

3.Tchobanoglous, G. (1979). Wastewater engineering. Treatment, disposal, reuse. 2.ed. Rev.by G. Tchobanoglous. New York: McGraw-Hill.

4.Kiely, G. (1998). Environmental engineering. London: McGraw-Hill. 

5.Feates, F. and Barratt, R. (1995). Integrated pollution management. London: McGraw-Hill.

6.Tchobanoglous, G., Burton, F. And Stensel, H. (2003). Wastewater engineering. Boston: McGraw-Hill. 

INDUSTRIAL & BUILDING AUTOMATION SYSTEMS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: face-to-face 
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 2

Tutorials, 1

Laboratory, 2

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The main aim of the course is to introduce students to the field of automation engineering and to the key concepts involved in the design, implementation and evaluation of modern practical control systems.

Upon successful completion of the module, students will be able to:

1. Identify and enumerate the main types of automation systems, depending to the purpose and the kind of industrial installation and operation performed.

2. Describe examples of simple dynamics, with reference to physical systems of various types (thermal, mechanical, chemical etc.)

3. Distinguih and enumerate the subsystems that make up a monitoring and/or control setup.

4. To analyse and represent a sequential logic operation in graphical form.

5. To analyse and represent a sequential logic operation, in the form of a block diagram and state-transition chart.

6. To develop and debug code used in applications that use Programmable Logic Controllers.

7. To explain, in the form of summary report, the methods and techniques used to solve common automation problems. 

Module Description

•Basic automation concepts: signals and systems, block diagrams, closed and open loop systems and continuous-time control systems and control discrete time

•Simple analysis of dynamical systems: linear dynamic systems 1st and 2nd class, integration / response in the time domain, frequency domain response

•Constituent units and composition of various automation technologies: sensors (sensors), action organs (actuators), architecture and interface (interfacing)

•Automation distinct situations: combinatorial, sequential automation, visualization of logic contacts with charts and diagrams statements

•Specification sequential automation systems: organization of the automation system, input-output tables, connecting peripherals and programming data

•Modern automation – Programmable logic controllers (PLC): structure and function of PLC, basic principles of programming, PLC implementation process in simple systems. 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

 

Theory =60%

- Final written examination.

- Project work (non-compulsory) contributing up to 25% of total mark for theory (in this case the contribution of the written examination is reduced accordingly).

 

Laboratory =40%

- Weekly oral examination.

- Final (short) written examination.

 

Support

- Indicative solutions of earlier examination papers

- Marking scheme for written examination and project work

- Examination topics 

Recommended or required Bibliography

Software (available under open, web,  public access, or academic licence) 

- PLC applications programming and simulation

- Dynamic systems (time response) simulation

Book in Greek (EL): F. Koumpoulis. “Industrial Control”, New Technologies Pub. 1999.

Additional references, including web-based material  provided during the lectures

Additional support material (solutions of earlier exams, examination topics etc.) made available at the beginning of the term and before the examinations.

Laboratory equipment and materials (workstations, power supplies, measurement and testing devices, tools etc.) 

HYDRAULICS & PNEUMATICS SYSTEMS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures, face to face and guided practice 
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 2

Guided Practice, 2 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The main learning outcome is the delivery to the students of a basic knowledge about hydraulics and pneumatics components that are used in modern automation systems design. The process of designing and implementation of such an integrated system follows up the rest of the course lectures that will provide to a student all necessary expertise in the field. Separated in two major branches, hydraulics and pneumatics will be explained in details not only as simple actuation systems but also as combined and complex operational systems of the same type that an automation engineer will face in any modern industrial environment in his career.  

Module Description

The course structure is based on:

 

Basic and fundamentals principles of key hydraulics and pneumatics elements, their diagrams, automation components as parts of block diagrams, DIN-ISO standards, tuning and motion circuits. In addition, students are provided with details of hydraulic power production systems and complex pneumatic automation circuits for industrial processes. In class there is a thoroughly description and demonstration of systems for energy transfer though hydraulics and pneumatics, there is also many references in the significance of the evolution of introducing automation control design in such systems and finally the outcomes of the comparison between advantages and disadvantages of such systems are well given to students. 

 

The course outline is summarized as follows:

1.Analysis of pneumatic parts with respect in theoretical knowledge for understanding their design and operation

2.Analysis of the control design of such systems with description of all necessary technologies.

3.Design of all basic hydraulic accessories and circuitry.

4.Analysis of creation and operation of hydraulic applications

5.Designation of operation of random multi-complex hydraulic systems

6.Explanation of ISO symbolisms for fluid transfer.

7.Presentation of pneumatic programmer, explanation of it and implementation. 

8.Programmable logical controllers and programming methods of piston movements correlation. 

9.Analysis of complex automation systems, illustration and examples of them

10.Investigation and presentation of special automation systems

11.Alternative methodologies for building hydraulic and pneumatic diagrams

12.Electro-hydraulic advanced circuits and applications in modern industry.

Guided Practice:

1.Single acting pneumatic cylinder

2.Double acting pneumatic cylinder

3.Speed increase and decrease of double acting pneumatic piston

4.Force increase and decrease of double acting pneumatic piston

5.Speed increase and decrease in both directions of double acting pneumatic piston

6.Force increase and decrease in both directions of double acting pneumatic piston

7.Correlated continuous movement of pistons

8.Piston regression and random point stopping

9.Automation of a transfer line

10.Piston speed adjustment in both stroke directions

11.Piston speed adjustment in both stroke directions via flow regulator

12.Hydraulic circuit of differential speed 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination: 100%

 

Optional job preparation and presentation of up to 30%, less than the proportion of written examination

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.«Υδραυλικά και πνευματικά συστήματα», Κωστόπουλος, Θεόδωρος Ν., εκδόσεις Συμεών 2009, ISBN: 9607888979

2.«Υδραυλικά – Πνευματικά Συστήματα και Εφαρμογές», Ρούτουλας Αθ., εκδόσεις Συγχρονη Εκδοτική 2008. 

3.«Υδραυλικά & Πνευματικά ΣΑΕ», Μιχ. Παπουτσιδάκης, Σημειώσεις Θεωρίας, 2011, http://islab.teipir.gr 

BIOENGINEERING

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Face to face, in classroom, in laboratory with teams of students 
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 2

Practicum, 2 

ECTS:
Web Page:
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Learning Outcomes

 

Upon completion of the course, students will be familiar with:

•What Biomechanics is and where it can be used

•The biocompatible materials used

•Biomechanics of bones

•Biomechanics of tendons

•Biomechanics of the spine

•Biomechanics of ligaments

•The methodology of designing and constructing artificial joints

•How the science of mechanical engineering can be combined with medicine

 

More specifically, students will be able to:

 

•Research, analysis and synthesis of data with the use of technology Individual Work

•Team work

•Work in interdisciplinary environment 

Module Description

INTRODUCTORY ELEMENTS

•Analytic geometry

•Vector analysis

•Calculation of applied forces on the bones

•Case studies on beams and later on, on bones

 

Biomechanics and arthroplasty of the hip

•Development of hip arthroplasty

•History of hip arthroplasty

•Problems of hip arthroplasty THE HIP BONE

•Anatomical details of the hip bone

•Mechanical properties of the bone

•Mechanical properties of the cortical bone

•The consequences of the replacement of bone joints with artificial joints

 

PROSTHESES LOOSENING

•Loosening reasons for the prostheses that are implanted with acrylic cement

•Loosening reasons for the prostheses that are implanted without acrylic cement 

 

MATERIALS USED IN MODERN ARTHROPLASTY - PROPERTIES – WAYS OF PRODUCTION – ORGANISM REACTIONS

•Metallic material

•CO-CR alloy

•Stainless steel

•Titanium and titanium alloy

•Non-metallic materials

•High density molecular weight polyethylene (UHMW-PE)

•Acrylic cement (POLYMETHYL - METHACRYLATE - PMMA)

•BIOCERAMICS

•HYDROXYLAPATITE - ΗΑ

 

BIOMECHANICS OF THE HIP

•Forces exerted on the hip/femor

•Effects of forces on the geometrical dimensions of the femor

 

QUALITY CONTROL OF PROSTHESIS

•Prosthesis control on dynamic resistance

•Stability and control of prosthesis micromotion

•Prosthesis ability control on the transfer of forces

•Debris – microparticles during friction and wear

•Wear mechanism in artificial joints

•Η επίδραση της τριβής και της φθοράς

•Definition of the construction accuracy of the prostheses and control methods of the sliding surfaces

 

DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION PRINCIPLES OF HIP PROSTHESES

•Internal geometry of the hip bone

•Hip prosthesis design

•The load transfer device LTD

•The stem STEM

•The HEAD 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

•Language of Exams: Greek

•Evaluation through short “tests” at the end of each laboratory 20%

•Class participation 20%

•Final exam 60%

 

Examinations and their responses are posted on the electronic platform of the course and are accessible from the students. 

Recommended or required Bibliography

•Instructor’s notes (in greek)

 

•Skitides, Ph. (2001) Total Arthroplasty of the hip: Materials, Methods and Biomechanics, Modern Publication, Athens. (ISBN 960-8165-33-4) (in greek) 

COMPUTER AIDED ENGINEERING (CAE)

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Face to Face 
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 2

Labs, 3 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The student gets a theoretical background on the structure of modern Computer Aided Engineering Systems as well as in the Finite Element Method. He gets familiar on producing the computational model, analyzing mechanical structures and evaluating the results.

On completion of the course students will have

•In-depth knowledge and critical understanding of the theory and principles on the use of modern CAE systems in the design of products

•Knowledge and skills on choosing the boundary conditions of the structural problem

•Knowledge and skills on choosing the loading conditions of the structural problem

•Knowledge and skills creating the meshing on the CAE Pre-Processor

•Knowledge and skills to analyze and critically evaluate the results of the stress analysis. 

Module Description

 

•Principles of the Finite Element Method

•Industrial Applications of CAE

•Transformation of geometrical CAD-model to computational model.

•Static Stress analysis of mechanical structures

•Types of Finite Elements (Beams, Shells, Tetrahedrals).

•Meshing techniques.

•Application of Constraints.

•Application of Loading. 

•Buckling, Eigenfrequencies, drop-test

•Evaluating the FEA Results.

•Optimization of structures.

•During each LAB-session a number of exercises are given out and explained to students in order to get familiar in using modern CAD/CAE-systems. 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final Exam consisting of stress analysis for mechanical parts and structures in theory (60%) and practical example (40%).

 

Optional case based study (individual or team work) with final presentation, which counts 25% positively on the final mark. 

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.BILALIS N., MARAVELAKIS M.: CAD/CAM SYSYETMS & 3D MODELING, KRITIKI PUBLICATIONS, 2014. (in Greek)

2.KUNWOO LEE: PRINCIPLES OF CAD/CAM/CAE. KLIDARITHMOS PUBLICATIONS 2009 (in Greek)

3.KUANG-HUA CHANG: PRODUCT DESIGN MODELING USING CAD/CAE. ACADEMIC PRESS, 2014

4.V. ADAMS, A. ASKENAZI: BUILDING BETTER PRODUCTS WITH FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS, 1998. ONWARD PRESS

 

- Journal Article Resources:

INTEGRATED COMPUTER-AIDED ENGINEERING – IOS PRESS 

8th Semester