Modules - Department of Computer Systems Engineering

1st Semester

MATHEMATICS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Face to face
Weekly Hours:  Lectures 4
ECTS:  7
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The aim of the course module is to provide students with: 

1.Knowledge of solving linear systems using Linear Algebra. 

2.Ability to solve equations using complex numbers.  

3.Ability to use integrals and in order to solve mathematical and mechanical problems.   

4.Calculating integrals using the appropriate methods. 

5.Knowledge of vector’s analysis  (inner product, angle, external product, etc)  

Module Description

Theory 

1.Introduction to vector’s analysis 

2.Inner product, external product, angle, vector measure. 

3.Basic laws of complex numbers.

4.Calculations in complex numbers.

5.The N-th roots of the unit.

6.The N-th roots of a complex number.

7.Calculating powers of complex numbers.

8.Introduction to matrices.

9.Solving linear systems using Crammer’s method.

10.Gauss’s Method in linear systems.

11.Inverse Matrix

12.Eigenvalues and Eigenvectors

13.Introduction to integrals and basics calculating methods.

14.Integrated problems solving.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final exam (100%)  or 

Mid Term Exams (50%) +Final Exam (50%)

Recommended or required Bibliography

Essential reading

Linear Algebra  Gilbert Strang, 2006.

- e-Books:

 http://218.4.189.15:8090/download/2ac43097-6138-4606-81f6-581964443e81.pdf

PHYSICS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Face to face
Weekly Hours:  Lectures 2, Problem solving 2, Laboratory experiments 2
ECTS:  6
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Students should be able to:

•Calculate mean, standard deviation, propagation of errors

•Generate graphs of laboratory measurements

•Produce linear expressions of exponential, logarithmic and power equations

•Define the speed, acceleration, kinetic energy, work.

•Compute the position, velocity and acceleration mobile if the relation (a) power-position, (b) speed-strength (c) Speed-position and (d) accelerate-position is given

•Define the conservation conditions of fields.

•Calculate whether a given field is conservative or not.

•Calculate the transportation quantities for simple oscillations, forced oscillations and oscillations that loose energy.

•Calculate the quality factor of the RLC oscillation circuit if these are in series

•Define the Fermi level

•Determine the energy and no-charge area of the p-n diodes

•Create the diagrams energy position in diodes

•Explain the phenomenon of avalanche.

•Write the four Maxwell's equations.

•Define the displacement current.

Module Description

INTRODUCTION TO LABORATORY PHYSICS 7 HOURS

 

1.ANALYSIS & PRESENTATION OF LABORATORY MEASUREMENTS (5 hours)

 

A. ANALYSIS OF ERRORS 2.5 HOURS

 

Importance of Error Analysis theory

Measurements

Actual value-True value

Probability-Distributions of measurement results

True error-Uncertainty-Relative Error

Bias-Random errors

Instrumental uncertainty

Mean-Average Error-bias

Other statistical moments

CI-Significant digits Scientific presentation of results-Rounding

Error propagation

Estimates of mean and error

Examples of calculations gcc and gfortran

Examples of actual measurement examples

 

V.LABORATORY MEASUREMENTS 2.5 HOURS

Graphs in scientific presentation

Presentations (trends) -Standard-equations

Slope of straight line- Experimental definitions

Curves-Common types

Tangent-Experimental definition

slope at point-Experimental Search

Adjusting a straight line

Method of least squares-x2-Likelihood-Weighting of the results

Spearman's coefficient r2

Estimation of errors

Adjusting polynomial coefficients

Multiple regression-Stepwise regression

Other methods (PCA, Multivariate methods, etc.)

Examples of actual measurements

 

2. SENSORS IN LABORATORY MEASUREMENTS (2 hours)

 

Measurements of electrical systems

 

A.COIL MULTIMETERS 0.5 HOURS

Fundamental physical principles

Description

Operating Principle

Use as multimeter as amperometers and voltometers

Extending the multimeter measuring range

Select the most suitable voltometer

Measuring Voltage with Multimeter

Current measurement with multimeter

 

B.OSCILLOSCOPE 1 HOUR

Description & parts

Electronic gun

Generator 

Amplifiers of horizontal & vertical deviations

Adjusting the beam intensity

Beam deflection systems-electrostatic, magnetic

Basic operation buttons

Measuring Angles with the oscilloscope

DC voltage measurement

AC voltage measurement

Composition-contribution mutual vertical oscillations Lissajous-Curves

Measurement of frequency through time difference

Measurement of requency through Lissajous curves

 

G.SENSORS 0.5 HOURS

deformation sensors

pressure sensors

temperature sensors

humidity sensor

 

LABORATORY ENGINEERING 22 HOURS

 

3.KINETICS OF BODIES & SYSTEMS (6 hours)

 

A.Dynamics  4 HOURS

Speed

Acceleration

Smooth linear motion

Newton's laws

Linear variable motion

Mechanical movement of body and body systems

Typical examples

 

B. Energy 1 HOUR

Work-energy

Theorem of kinetic energy

Conservative forces

 

C. Gravity  1 HOUR

Acceleration of gravity

gravity field

Intensity of gravitational field

Free body drop

Laboratory calculation of gravitational acceleration through freefall

 

4.OSCILLATIONS & WAVES (16 hours)

 

A.MECHANICAL OSCILLATIONS 7 HOURS

Springs and Hooke's Law

Harmonic oscillation spring

Fixed-oscillation relative to natural frequency

Oscillation spring system

simple pendulum

Free vibration pendulum

Descending oscillating pendulum-impact resistance

 

flow materials internal friction

Quality factor of oscillation

Laboratory calculation sizes through oscillating body

Laboratory calculation of gravitational acceleration through vibration

Laboratory calculation of vibration resistance

Molecular background of oscillatory behavior-tension, compression and torsion

 

V. WAVES 7 HOURS

Harmonic waves

Equation of harmonic wave

Phase velocity and group velocity

Equation of wave

Harmonics and wave energy

T Waves in three-dimensional space

Geometric representation

Energy density and wave intensity

Equation of plane waves

Spherical wave equation

Attenuation of elastic waves

Acoustic waves

Nature of acoustic waves

Fourier analysis

Unit db and dbm

Laboratory calculation of attenuation coefficient of waves

 

G.NORMAL OSCILLATION MODES 2 HOURS

Normal oscillations of many particles system

Normal oscillations of elastic string

Details of natural musical body

Laboratory study of normal oscillation modes

 

ELECTRIC POWER 8 HOURS

 

5.FUNDAMENTAL ELECTRICAL DATA (2 hours)

 

A.ELECTRIC RESISTANCE 1 HOUR

Definition

Measuring resistance with multimeter

Measuring resistance with voltmeter and ammeter-minimum measurement errors

Resistance parallel to the voltmeter

Resistor in series with the ammeter

Maximum resistance determination of measurable

 

B.ELECTRIC SOURCES 0.5 HOURS

Electromotive force

Internal source-polar voltage resistance

ODR-induced mechanical moving conductor pattern

Electrolytic potential depolarization electrodes

Accumulators and

Lead accumulator

Nickel alkaline accumulator

Galvanic cells

Non-rechargeable batteries

 

C.CAPACITORS 0.5 HOURS

Extended-localized electrostatic fields

Localized field capacity

Definitions

Units of measurement

Energy and energy density of localized electrostatic field

Forms of capacitors

 

6. FUNDAMENTAL ELECTRICAL CIRCUITS (6 hours)

 

A.RC CIRCUIT 2 HOURS

Charging capacitor

Decharging capacitor

Time constant RC-statistical significance

Transition behavior of RC circuit

Differential load of RC circuit 

 

B.RL  CIRCUIT 0.5 HOURS

RL time constant-statistical significance

Transition behaviour of RL circuit

 

RLC CIRCUITS 3.5 HOURS

Impedance

Definitions

Transition behaviour RLC circuit

Frequency

Supercritical depreciation

critical damping

Subcritical damping

Comparison of three types of depreciation

Harmonically excited RLC circuits

Forced oscillations

Relationship quality factor and resonance curves

Physical significance of the quality factor

RLC circuit in parallel

Maximum impedance

Maximum power

 

PHYSICS OF SOLID & ELECTRONIC PHYSICS 12 HOURS

A.THEORY 6 HOURS

Particles & Waves

De Broglie waves

Equation of Scrhoendinger

Linear energy spectrum persons

Quantum numbers

Atomic physics concepts

Free energy spectrum and electron beam

Fundamental and excited individual situation

Energy bands

Energy spectrum of electrons in a crystal

Distinction conductor-insulator-semiconductor

Electrical conductivity of semiconductors

intrinsic semiconductors

Semiconductors impurities

Effective electron mass

Holes and electrons

Release and reconnection bodies

Contact p-n

Contact p-n in thermal equilibrium

contact potential

Contact p-n under the influence of external electro field

 

B.Electron emission from METALS 1 HOUR

Function Fermi-Dirac distribution

Thermionic electron emission

Laboratory study thermionic electron emission from metal

 

C.OTHER SEMICONDUCTORS 3 HOURS

Photoelectric phenomenon

Internal photoelectric effect

Einstein's photoelectric equation

photodiodes

LED behaviour

Non illuminated LED

Illuminated LED

saturation current

Dark current

Characteristic curve of photodiode

Photoelectric cell

Characteristic curves of photocells

Solar cell

Solar element under load

 

D.DIODS 1 HOUR

Laboratory characteristic of electron-holes

Laboratory characteristic Zener diode

 

E.LASER 1 HOUR

Wave and particle nature of light

contribution light

Contribution coherent light barrier

Polarization of light

Laser radiation

Reverse populations metastable state

Laser ruby

Laser He-Ne

Laser radiation properties

Laser applications

Laboratory study laser light contribution in dam

Laboratory study of light polarization

 

ELECTROMAGNETISM 11 HOURS

 

A.RELATIVE MOVEMENTS FIELD 2 HOURS

Properties of EM forces

Movement in standing EM fields

Sliding in curves and non uniform magnetic fields

Movement in varying EM fields

Earth radiation belts

V.AMPERE'S & GAUSS'S LAWS 2 HOURS

Law of Ampere

Gauss law

Forces between current carrying conductors

G. MUTUAL INDUCTION & inductance 3 HOURS

Faraday law

Displacement current

Self-induction

Conjugated fields

Magnetic field energy

D.MAXWELL EQUATIONS 4 HOURS

Maxwell equations in vacuum without sources and sources

Magnetic field and magnetic induction

Electric field and dielectric displacement

Dissemination of EM fields in conductors

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Assessment Language: Greek and English for Erasmus students.

Evaluation of the theoretical part (60%)

Ι.A written final examination (50%) comprising the methodological solving of exercises and the and analysis of issues in mechanics, electromagnetism, oscillations and waves.

II. Participation in project (5%)

III. Participation in class (5%)

Evaluation of the laboratory (40%)

IV. Laboratory Practice

I. Individual or group (maximum 3 people) report to each laboratory exercise that includes a description of the exercise, presentation of measurement, presentation of results (calculations, charts, etc.) and drawing conclusions. (20%)

II. Weekly oral examination at issue in making laboratory exercise (40%)

III. In the presence of (10%)

IV. Final written examination (30%)

The criteria are posted on the site

http://dniko.herokuapp.com/ 

Recommended or required Bibliography

Recommended Book:

1.H.D.Young, “Physics”, Pearson 13th edition, 2011

2.M. Aloson, E. Finn, “Fundamental University Physics”, 1992

3.“Physics”, J. Willey and Sons, 1992.

4.“Physics for Scientists and Engineers”, Serway – SGSS, 1992

Berkley Physics Cources”, McGraw-Hill, 1978.

ELECTROMECHANICAL DESIGN

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Face to face
Weekly Hours:  Lectures 2, Laboratory experiments 2
ECTS:  5
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Students, after finishing this course,  will be able to:

•Use AutoCAD and Eagle programs.

•Understand the rules of printed circuits.

•Design Interior electrical installations.

• Design Mechanical and electronic design in an AutoCAD programs.

• Make use of Mechanical design rules.

•Design schematics and layouts for printed circuits using Eagle programs.

Module Description

Goal:

Introduction and better understanding the 3D models in order to be able to construct mechanical parts. The understanding of basic electrical rates and components, electrical symbols, logical diagrams etc. The ability to use CAD platforms. The ability to use the EAGLE program. The presentation of printed works, using the appropriate program, to large format (A3).

Description:

Principles Mechanical design, Electronic design principles, design Cabling

Networks, Spatial analysis, design principles of schematic circuits Introduction to three-dimensional design, Doctrine vector design using CAD programs.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written final exam (60%).

Laboratory exercises (40%).

Two exercises are taking place during the semester (with 20% each).

Recommended or required Bibliography

-Προτεινόμενη Βιβλιογραφία :

1.Mastering AutoCAD 2015 and AutoCAD LT 2015: Autodesk Official Press1st Edition, George Omura, Brian C. Benton, Sybex, 2015 

2.Beginning AutoCAD 2015 , Cheryl Shrock, Steve Heather, 2014

3.Printed Circuit Design with EAGLE, J.Viscaino et al., 2013

Learning to fly with EAGLE v.6, Duncan, ELEKTOR Publishing,  2013

INTRODUCTION TO PROGRAMMING

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Lectures, Face to face
Weekly Hours:  Lectures 2, Practical Lectures 2, Laboratory 2
ECTS:  6
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, students will have:

1.The ability to write, compile and debug programs in C language

2.A good knowledge and understanding of programming using a structured language

3.Knowledge and skills in using algorithms for general purpose programming.

4.Knowledge and skills in developing medium scale programming projects.

Module Description

Lectures

1.Introduction to programming

2.Data types, Variable, Operators, Expressions

3.Input, output

4.Flow control

5.Decisions

6.Loops

7.Arrays

8.Pointers and References

9.Functions

10.Functions, Scope and visibility

11.Advanced use of functions

12.Functions and arrays, Recursive functions

13.Advanced programs and applications

Laboratories

1.Introduction to IDE, simple programs

2.Input, output, Data types, Variable, Operators, Expressions

3.Flow control

4.Decisions

5.Loops

6.Arrays

7.Pointers and References

8.Functions

9.Functions, Scope and visibility

10.Advanced use of functions

11.Functions and arrays, Recursive functions

12.Advanced programs and applications I

13.Advanced programs and applications II

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination: 60%

Laboratory exercise: 40%

Project presentation of up to 20%, towards the written examination 

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Recommended Book and Journal Article Resources:

•C. Sedgewick, Algorithms in C, 1998, Addison-Wesley

•Kernighan, Ritchie, 1988, The C Programming Language, 2nd Edition, Prentice Hall

•S. Prata, C Primer Plus (Developer's Library), 2013, 6th Edition, Addison-Wesley Professional

•Y.H. Lu, 2015, Intermediate C Programming, CRC Press

•C Style and Coding Standards, http://www.chrisott.org/resources/cstyle/ indhillcstyle.pdf

 

ELECTRONICS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Face to face
Weekly Hours:  Lectures 2, Problem solving 2, Laboratory experiments 2
ECTS:  6
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

This course is a basic introduction to the concepts of electronic components and circuits. Students gain the necessary knowledge and skills to be able to analyze, simulate and design analog electronic circuits with discrete elements of linear and non-linear elements in direct and alternating current, for small input signals.

The student after completion of the course will be able to: 

• Understand  voltage, current, resistance and fundamentals of  DC circuits

• Define the circuit elements

• Choose the appropriate resistors

• Demonstrate the procedures of superposition principles,

• Calculate the electrical characteristics of the circuits

• Design the  equivalents Thevenin and Norton circuits

• Explain the principles of operation of basic semiconductor devices

• Draw the I-V characteristic of the electronic devices

• Compute and design the hybrid equivalent small signals

• Select  information from the data of the data manufacturers

Module Description

The course aims to give the students the opportunity to gain strong knowledge on the principles of the electronic Circuits analysis and Design. They will be able to master the necessary knowledge and skills and be able to analyze, simulate and design analog electronic circuits with all type of discrete linear and non linear components (Diodes and transistors) in AC and DC. Topics that are covered are:

Electric circuit. Kirchhoff Laws.

Electric circuits. Basic laws and methods used to solve linear circuits (proportionality, superposition, Thevenin and Norton Theorems, Millman etc). 

p-n junctions. Diodes, Describe the structure and physical operation of the diode and Zener diode.

The current-voltage characteristics for ideal/real diodes and Zener diodes, 

Design/analyse circuits containing passive elements and diodes eg. half and full wave rectifiers, voltage regulators, peak rectifiers

Analyse/describe circuits containing Zener Diodes 

Introduction to the basic concepts of amplifying devices. Uni-junction transistor amplifiers Bipolar transistor (BJT).  Field effect Transistor (FET). BJTs and FETs Bias circuits. Analysis of the stability of the quiescent point. Small signal equivalent circuits, parameters and technical characteristics. Models and parameters of electronic components, simulation thereof. 

Operation of transistors at low frequencies in common emitter, common base and common collector modes respectively (BJTs and FETs).

Bipolar contact transistor (BJT), the transistor as a switch structure and operation of the NPN transistor and PNP, bias circuits CB, CE, CC. Relationship between IC currents, IB and IE input and output characteristic of the BJT

Field Effect Transistor (FET). Polarization amplifier circuits with contact transistors and field analysis of the resting point of stability, power sources.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

A midterm exam and an exam at the end of the semester  totally 50% comprising:

A Problem solving  with resistance wiring, diodes exercises and applications, principle of superposition, Thevenin's theorem, Norton,

B Problem solving  on transistor (BJT, FET) or using only DC or AC source and using hybrid parameters

Or 

Final exam with all the above  described material. 

II. Laboratory training (40%)

III. Active participation in class (10%)

Recommended or required Bibliography

Recommended Book:

1.“The Art of Electronics”, Horowitz & Hill, Cambridge University Press,3rd ed., 2015

2. “Electronic devices and Circuit Theory”, R. Boylestal, L. Nashelsky, Prentice Hall, 11th ed., 2012

3.“Electronics – Diodes and Amplifying components”  P. Yannakopoulos, 2012

4.Microelectronic Circuit Design / Jaeger & Blalock, 4th Edition, McGraw Hill, ISBN 978-0-07-338045-2, 2011.

5.«Microelectronic Circuits» A. S. Sedra and K. C. Smith, Oxford University Press, 6th edition, ISBN-978-0-19-532303-0,  2010

6.“Advanced Electronic Circuits”, U. Tietze, Berlin: Springer Verlag, 1998.

7.“Computerized Circuit Analysis Using SPICE Programs”, B.M Wilamowski, R.C. Jaeger, Mc Graw-Hill,  1997

8. “Electronic Circuits Analysis, Simulation and Design”, N. R. Malik, Prentice Hall, 1995.

9. “Electronics Circuits and Applications”, S.D. Senturia, John Wiley & Sons, 1989

 

Internet Sources

10.http://101science.com/basicelectronics.htm 

11.http://wiring.org.co/learning/tutorials/breadboard/

12.http://www.electronics-tutorials.ws/logic/logic_1.html 

 

Journal Article Resources

   http://www.ijecse.org/

2nd Semester

APPLIED MATHEMATICS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Face to face
Weekly Hours:  Lectures 4, Problem Solving 1
ECTS:  7.5
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The aim of the course module is to provide students with: 

1. Knowledge of solving first order’s differential equations

2. Ability to solve higher order’s differential equations and systems of differential  equations.   

3. Ability to use Laplace transformation in order to solve ordinary differential equations.   

4. Ability to use fundamental Discrete functions and properties

5. Knowledge of solving delicate problems using the above methods in several fields. 

Module Description

Theory 

1. Introduction differential equations. 

2. Homogeneous differential equations of first order. 

3. The use of the integral Euler factor m.

4. Linear differential equations of first order.

5. Several kinds of differential equations: Bernoulli, Ricatti, Clairaut, Euler, etc.

6. Wrosky’s methods.

7. Introduction to Laplace transformation.

8. Solving differential equations using Laplace transformation.

9. The reverse Laplace transformation and how we use it.

10. Introduction to Discrete Mathematics. Fundamental Logic Definitions

11. Fundamental Set Theory

12. Introduction to Combinatorial Theory

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final Exam (100%)

Mid-Term Exams (50%) and Final Exam (50%)

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Recommended Books:

Introduction to Applied Mathematics, Gilbert Strang, Wellesley-Cambridge Press (January 1, 1986)

LOGIC CIRCUITS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Face to face
Weekly Hours:  Lectures 2, Problem Solving 1, Laboratory experiments 2
ECTS:  5.5
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The learning outcomes of the theoretical part are the following:

•Comprehend different number systems 

•Demonstrate knowledge on the arithmetic operations 

•Generalize the arithmetic operations of all number systems

•represent numerical values in various number systems and perform number conversions between different number systems

•Identify the main codes used in the computer systems

•Identify the arithmetic operations of the IEEE-754 standard

•Use the theorems of Boolean Algebra (e.g. De Morgan’s theorems)

•Select  the appropriate theorem for simplification/manipulation

•Construct a Karnaugh Map

•Propose the appropriate method for logic functions’ minimization (e.g. Karnaugh, Quine Mc Cluskey etc)

•Demonstrate the knowledge on the operation of logic gates

•Selection of the appropriate logic gates for the implementation of a certain formula

•Integrate gates for arithmetic operations

•Design circuits using flip-flops

•Classify the different types of counters 

•Outline the use of PLA ,PAL, PROMs

•Analyze combinational circuits including arithmetic circuits (half adder, full adder, multiplier)

•Analyze sequential  circuits 

•Produce simple circuits

•Make registers, counters, encoders, multiplexers

•Synthesize a given system starting with problem requirements, identifying and designing the building blocks

•evaluate the relative merits of different designs

 

Laboratory (Experimental part)

Ιn the laboratory the students will acquire the adequate Knowledge targeting the following outcomes:

•select  the  appropriate logic gates 

•Implement algebraic functions using logic Gates 

•Apply Boolean algebra to switching logic design and simplification 

•produce the 7 segment display operation

•analyse and employ of basic circuits for arithmetic operations 

•design the basic memory element 

•design a register

•Compose gates and ICs

•Produce counters

•select the appropriate memory for cost minimisation

•compare the use of PLA, PAL, RPROMs

•implement  encoders and multiplexers

•analyze digital combinational and sequential circuits

•Validate system’s functionality 

•Examine ALTERA

Module Description

The following description covers the teaching hours per course content to the completion of the 39 hour theoretical part of the course.

• Basic arithmetic systems- unsigned and signed numbers Calculations and conversions on different systems radix (5)

• BCD Codes , Gray, Aiken, etc. (2)

• IEEE representation (1)

• Basic Logic gates and truth table. (2)

• Boolean Algebra - Theorems, POS, SOP and implementation circuits Simplification with zeros (6)

• De Morgan's theorems - NAND and NOR gates. (1)

• multivariate Karnaugh Map (3)

• Multiplexers Encoders. (3)

• Basic Flip-Flops (2)

• The J-K Flip-Flop (1)

• Multivibrators (2)

• Counters (2)

• Synchronous counters and other state machines (6)

• Use of memory - PLA, PROM, PAL, RAM, ROM, PROM and its applications (3)

 

Laboratory- experimental part (13 weeks )

The following laboratory exercises are implemented: 

•Logic Gates

•Boolean Algebra - KARNAUGH MAP - DESIGN with NAND and NOR gates

•BCD TO 7 SEGMENT 

•Adders, subtractors

•FLIP-FLOPs

•processor register – shift registers

•Multiplexers, Demultiplexers 

•Counters I  - Asynchronous binary counters

•Counters II - APPLICATIONS WITH IC 74193 (Up-down counter, variable modulo-counter)

•Programming PLA, PLA, PROM

•A / D-D / A

•DIGITAL SYSTEMS DESIGN using ALTERA (4 hours)

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Assessment Language: Greek and English for Erasmus students

Students’ evaluation comprises of the Theoretical part (60%) and laboratory (40%)

A. Theoretical Part

I. A written final examination (40%) comprising:

    number systems conversion

    Use of codes

    Counters

    Basic applications using memories

    Use of gates and Karnaugh map

    Sequential and combinational circuits

    memories

II.  Multiple choice exam (10%)

III. class participation (10%)

 

B. Laboratory

I. Individual or group (maximum 3 people) report to each laboratory exercise that includes a description of the exercise, presentation of measurements, presentation of results (calculations, charts, etc.) and conclusions. (20%)

II. Weekly oral examination on the thematic unit (40%)

III. Lab participation (10%)

IV. Final written examination (30%)

 

The criteria are posted on the site

http://dniko.herokuapp.com/

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Recommended Books:

1.Digital Design, M. Morris R. Mano and Michael D. Ciletti, 4th Ed.,  2012

2.Digital Design: Principles and Practices, J. Wakerly, 2005. 

3.Practical Digital Electronics, N.P. Cook,  Pearson/Prentice Hall, 2004

4.Digital Electronics. A Practical Approach, W. Kleitz,  Prentice Hall,  2005

5.Digital Systems, Principles and Applications, R.J. Tocci., N.S.Widmer, G.L. Moss. Pearson/Prentice Hall, 2004

6.Digital Fundamentals, T.L.Floyd. 8th Ed.,  Prentice Hall,   8th ed., 2005

7.Complete Digital Design, M. Balch, Mc Graw Hill, 2003

8.Digital Principles and Design, D.Givone, Mc Graw Hill, 2002

9.Digital Logic Design, 4th  Edition, Brian Holdsworth; Clive Woods,  Newnes, 2002

10.Digital Logic Design Principles, N.Balabanian, John Wiley, 2001

 

Webliography

•http://www.allaboutcircuits.com/textbook/digital/ 

•http://www.electronics-tutorials.ws/logic/logic_1.html  

•http://www.electronics-tutorials.ws/  

Journal Article Resources 

Circuits and Systems Magazine, IEEE

CIRCUIT THEORY

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Face to face
Weekly Hours:  Lectures 2, Laboratory 2
ECTS:  5
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

It is a prerequisite course introducing students to circuit analysis, leading through to an intermediate level of using transforms (Laplace & Fourier). 

The student upon the completion of the course he will be able to: 

•Select the appropriate analysis methodology

•Apply all the analysis methods, 

•competence to provide transfer functions, frequency response plots, impulse and step response for different circuits, 

•Construct the functions of simple circuits by interpretation of specifications. 

•Identify different circuits 

•Apply theoretical knowledge in performing the  lab measurements

•Prepare simulation programs 

•Organise  presentation of your lab work 

•a laboratory project using ICT means

Module Description

THEORY

1.Introduction: Basic Principles & Definitions – Circuit Properties & Classification – Signals.

2.Circuit elements – Laws – Energy & Power.

3.Kirchhoff’s Laws – Analysis Methods: Loop-Current & Node-Voltage Methods, Matrix & Determinant Formulation of Equations.

4.Time Response: Natural – Forced – Complete Response.

5.Laplace Transform: Properties – Inverse Transform – Tables – Calculation Techniques.

6.Circuit Analysis: Transfer & Driving Point Functions – Poles & Zeros – Step & Impulse Response.

7.Fourier Transform: Frequency Analysis – Amplitude & Phase Response.

8.Analog Filters – Filter Orders – Passive & Active Filters – Operational Amplifiers.

 

EXPERIMENTAL PART (13 weeks)

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Theory: Written examination at the end of the semester  (60%)

 

Laboratory: 

Interim   20%

Final exam. 50%

Oral examination of Exercises 30%

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Recommended Book 

 “Electric Circuits”, J.A. Edminister, Schaum’s Outline Series, 6th edition, McGraw Hill,2013

 “Electric Circuit Analysis”, W.H. Hayt Jr. &  J.E. Kemmerly, McGraw Hill, 2002.

“Transform Circuit Analysis for Engineering and Technology”, W. D. Stanley, 5th , Prentice-Hall, 2002

“Network Analysis”, M.E. Van Valkenburg, 3rd, Prentice-Hall, 1974

 

e-books

https://lasenisy.files.wordpress.com/2015/06/network-analysis-van-valkenburg-free-ebook-pdf.pdf 

 

Journal Article Resources:

 

MICROELECTRONICS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Face to face
Weekly Hours:  Lectures 2, Problem solving 2, Laboratory experiments 2
ECTS:  6
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Students, after finishing this course,  will be able to:

•Describe the Differential and Operational Amplifiers.

•Distinguish the Differential and Operational Amplifiers.

•Using the semiconductors FPGAs.

•Make use of PSPICE programs.

•Design basic elements using FPGAs.

Module Description

Goal:

The Goal of this course is that the students gain practical knowledge of analysis, design  and manufacturing of integrated microelectronic circuit elements.

Theoretical Part:

Differential Amplifiers, Operational Amplifiers.

IC construction (crystals growth, wafer construction, epitaxy,  oxidation, diffusion, implantation, microlithography).  VLSI, FPGA design.

FET (NMOS, PMOS) and bipolar. High speed Transistor. 

Analog ICs, analog MOSFET models. Bipolar, MOS, CMOS, BiCMOS, ECL Dynamic, CCDs.

Simualtion Parameters using SPICE 

Laboratory

The student will be able to understand the features of ICs 

Have the adequate experience in designing  IC 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written final exam (60%).

Laboratory exercises (40%).

Recommended or required Bibliography

-Recommended books:

1. Richard C. Jaeger, “Μικροηλεκτρονική”, McGraw-Hill – Tziola, 2013

–Scientific Journals

STRUCTURED PROGRAMMING

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Face to face
Weekly Hours:  Lectures 2, Practical Lectures 2, Laboratories 2
ECTS:  6
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:

1.Write and Develop programs making extensive use of functions

2.Create and use structures and pointers

3.Organize and use files, dynamic memory allocation and dynamic data  structures

4.Apply complex  and advanced Structured programming  techniques

 

Furthermore students will be able to:

1.Use an integrated programming environment effectively.

2.Analyze, Design, correctly implement solutions to simple computational problems

3.Proficiently transform designs of problem solutions into C programming language.

4.Apply debugging and testing techniques to locate errors

5.Apply structured programming techniques including design approaches, mnemonic naming, and use of documentation and avoidance of excessive branching.

Module Description

Lectures 

1.Principles of structured programming

2.Characters and Strings

3.Pointers to functions

4.Dynamic memory allocation

5.Application with dynamic arrays

6.Enumerations, Unions

7.Structures

8.Functions and structures

9.Files I

10.Files II

11.Stacks

12.Linked lists and queues

13.Advanced applications and problems

 

Laboratories

1.Functions and Arrays using principles of structured programming

2.Characters and Strings

3.Pointers to functions

4.Dynamic memory allocation

5.Application with dynamic arrays

6.Enumerations, Unions

7.Using Structures

8.Functions and structures

9.Application with Files I

10.Application with Files II

11.Stacks and applications

12.Linked lists and queues

13.Advanced applications and problems

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination: 60%

Laboratory examination: 40%

Project presentation of up to 20%, towards the written examination

Recommended or required Bibliography

Recommended Book and Journal Article Resources:

1.Y.H. Lu, 2015, Intermediate C Programming, CRC Press

2.S. Prata, C Primer Plus (Developer's Library), 2013, 6th Edition, Addison-Wesley Professional

3.C. Sedgewick, Algorithms in C, 1998, Addison-Wesley

4.Kernighan, Ritchie, 1988, The C Programming Language, 2nd Edition, Prentice Hall

5.C Style and Coding Standards,  http://www.chrisott.org/resources/cstyle/ indhillcstyle.pdf

 

3rd Semester

SIGNALS AND SYSTEMS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Face to face
Weekly Hours:  Lectures 2, Labs 2
ECTS:  
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

A student who successfully fulfils the course requirements will have demonstrated:

- An ability to recognize, use, and analyze signals coming from diverse disciplines and represent them in terms of elementary signals such as step, ramp, parabolic, sinusoidal, and exponential signals.

- An ability to understand basic signals operations such as convolution, correlation, signal shifting.

- Knowledge and understanding of linear system dynamics.

- Knowledge of methods for finding the system transient and steady state responses.

- Understanding of basic linear dynamic systems concepts such as stability,  observability and controllability.

- An ability to represent and study linear systems in the state space form and build corresponding system block diagrams.

- Knowledge of main properties of linear feedback systems.

- Full understanding of Fourier, Laplace, and Z transforms and their inverses. 

Module Description

The following gives a list of topics, covered in the course :

Theory

1.Basic fundamental concepts about signals

2.Basic operations on signals

3.Differential Equation Models

4.System classifications  

5.Convolution of analog and digital signals

6.Laplace    transforms 

7.Z transforms

8.Active and Passive filters

9.Frequency response 

10.Determination of steady-state sinusoidal response of linear systems.

11.Fourier series 

12.Fourier transform

13.Applications of Fourier Transform - Filtering

Laboratory

1.Introduction to MATLAB® (2 Weaks)

2.Signals

3.Systems

4.Time Domain System Analysis

5.Fourier Series

6.Fourier Transform

7.Fourier Analysis of Discrete-Time Signal

8.Frequency Response

9.The Laplace Transform

10.The z-Transform

11.Transfer Function

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final exam (40%)

Coursework (20%)

Written lab exams (40%)

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Recommended Book and Journal Article Resources:

1.Palamides A., Veloni  A.,“Signals and Systems Laboratory With Matlab” , CRC Press, (2010)

2.Hsu H. P., “Schaum's Outline of Signals and Systems,  2nd Ed.,  2010

3.Lathi B.P., “Linear Systems and Signals” The Oxford Series in Electrical and Computer Engineering, 2004.

4.Ziemer R. E., Tranter W. H., Fannin D. R., "Signals and Systems: Continuous and Discrete", 3rd Ed., Macmillan, 2005

5.Balmer L., "Signals and Systems", 2nd Ed., Prentice Hall, 2004

6.Girod B., Rabenstein R., Stenger A., "Signals and Systems", Wiley, 2004

 

OBJECT ORIENTED PROGRAMMING

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Face to face
Weekly Hours:  Lectures 3, Problem Solving 1, Laboratory experiments 2
ECTS:  7
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this class, students should be able to:

1.Understand the concept of OOP as well as the purpose and usage principles of inheritance, polymorphism, encapsulation and method overloading.

2.Identify classes, objects, members of a class and the relationships among them needed for a specific problem.

3.Create Java application programs using sound OOP practices (e.g., interfaces and APIs)

4.Use testing and debugging tools to automatically discover errors of Java programs as well as use versioning tools for collaborative programming/editing.

Module Description

1.Introduction to Programming with Java

2.Selections, Loops

3.Characters and Strings 

4.Methods

5.Arrays

6.Objects and Classes

7.Inheritance and Polymorphism

8.Advanced Object-Oriented Thinking

9.Exception Handling 

10.Abstract Classes and Interfaces

11.Java Swing

12.Event-Driven Programming and Animations 

13.Java Database Programming 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination: 60%

Laboratory examination: 40%

Project presentation of up to 20%, towards the written examination

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Recommended Books:

1.H.Schildt, Java: The Complete Reference, 2014, 9th Ed., McGraw-Hill Education

2.Dr. Liang, Intro to Java Programming, 2014, 10th Ed., Pearson

3.C.  Hunt and B. John, Java Performance, 2012, 1st Ed., Addison-Wesley Professional

 

COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE I

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:

Theory and Practice Exercise: in Auditorium

Laboratory Sessions: in Laboratory Room

Weekly Hours:  Theory 3, Practice Exercises 1, Laboratory 2
ECTS:  7
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the semester, students must be able:

-To describe the structure of a basic MicroProcessor (M/P), name its main parts, draw its block diagram and its connection with the Memory 

-To explain the way a M/P stores arithmetic values and the way simple arithmetic and logic operations are performed

-To show all the intermediate steps an Assembly program is transformed before it is ready to execute and to describe the way a M/P Assembly language instruction is executed

-To list basic M/P Assembly instructions and explain their operation

-To highlight the significance of each part of the M/P and explain its role in the overall M/P operation 

-To discuss about M/P technical characteristics and their impact to the M/P performance

-To compose M/P Assembly language programs suitable to perform arithmetic or logic calculations, relate data, produce outputs, etc. 

-To show how code, input data and results of an Assembly program are stored into the Memory (i.e. to compose a "Memory Map" of the program)

-To examine and analyze the way components of M/P and the M/P itself and Memory are connected   

-To examine and analyze software problems, solve them using computing and/or algorithmic methods and generalize conclusions to apply them to similar cases  

-To integrate knowledge of different domains such as Electronics, Boolean Algebra, Programming, etc. to compose an extended and in-depth view of the M/P and the Memory   

-To evaluate the technical characteristics of a M/P and rate its performance  

Module Description

Structure and operation analysis of Microprocessors and their contribution to the implementation of microcomputer systems. Internal architecture, addressing modes, instruction set, programming model. Operation and control software applications such as assemblers, linkers, loaders, simulators, etc. Programming in assembly language and applications. 

The laboratory exercises are designed and operating under the  software emu8086, a simulator of the processor 8086 and its Memory. All Laboratory practice of students is based on this specific software, and there is the possibility of using it in the student PCs at home.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Theory: Written examination at the end of the semester (60%)

Laboratory: Interim and final exam. Oral examination of Exercises (40%)

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Recommended Book and Journal Article Resources:

1.N. Senthil Kumar, M. Saravanan, S. Jeevananthan, «Microprocessors and Microcontrollers», Oxford University Press, 2011

2.John Uffenbeck, «Microcomputers and Microprocessors», Prentice Hall, 1999

 

VLSI DESIGN

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Face to face
Weekly Hours:  Lectures 2, Problem solving 1, Laboratory experiments 2
ECTS:  5.5
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Students should be able to:

•Acknowledge VLSI Design Methodologies

• Acknowledge Design Methodologies Standard Cell Design, Full custom Design, ASIC

•They design modern analog and digital circuits very high integration.

• Implement full-custom layout.

•Support Circuit simulation with SPICE.

•They create many Grade Amplifiers.

•They design systems (D / A, A / D, Filters, Modulators, Multipliers, u)

•Choose structured methodology to the design of very large systems.

•They plan Subsystems CMOS, RAM data memory, ROM.

Module Description

Goal:

The course goal is t students to acquire expertise in methodology, design and construction of modern analog and digital circuits very large integration (VLSI).

Description:

Methodologies Design VLSI, Standard Cell Design, Full custom Design, ASIC,

FPGA, VHDL, ASIC. Design Technologies. Types of differential amplifiers opamp

amplifiers, digital circuits. Explicit reference to the CMOS circuit design techniques, BiCMOS. VLSI Integrated Circuits. Models weak signal and DC.

Circuit simulation with SPICE. Basic building Circuits (Power Sources,

Mirrors, switches) Amplifiers (Inverter, Succession, Differential, Output and effector).

Amplifiers Multistage, Frequency Response, Feedback, Stability. Proportional

Systems (D / A, A / D, Filters, Modulators, Multipliers, Oscillators, PLL).

circuit characterization and performance assessment: assessment of resistance, capacitor,

distributors and characteristic, size CMOS transistors. Structured methodology to the design of very large systems. Design Subsystem CMOS, RAM memory elements, ROMs, control, timing. Physical Design. Layout (spread). Circuits Discontinued capacitors and filters applications.

Laboratory:

The objective of the VLSI Design Laboratory is:

The acquaintance of students with the CMOS integrated circuits design methodologies

familiarity of with full physical design technique (full-custom layout) logic gates using computer integrated circuit design tools

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written final exam (60%).

Laboratory exercises (40%).

Recommended or required Bibliography

-Recommended Books :

1. “VLSI Design Techniques for Analog and Digital Circuits (McGraw-Hill Series in Electrical Engineering)”, Geiger-Allen-Strader, McGraw- Hill, 2013

2.“Mixed Analog-Digital VLSI Devices and Technology”, Y. Tsividis, McGraw-Hill, World Scientific, 2005

3.VLSI Design, A. ALBERT RAJ, T. LATHA PHI Learning Pvt. Ltd., 2008 

4.VLSI Design Techniques for Analog and Digital Circuits Randall L. Geiger, 2007

5.VLSI Design, V.S.Bagad,  Technical Publications, 2009

 

ALGORITHMS & DATA STRUCTURES

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Face to face
Weekly Hours:  Lectures 2, Problem solving 1, Laboratory experiments 2
ECTS:  5.5
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The learning outcomes of the theoretical part are the following:

•Describe the use of the main Data Structures and Algorithms (DSA)

•Develop software

•Analyze Algorithms, 

• Make mental Data types,

•create lists, stacks,

•Analyze queues, Dual Queues,

•Implement search trees

•Recognize fragmentation tables

•Evaluate the search algorithms and classification

Module Description

The purpose of the course is for the students to understand, the construction and use of the main Data Structures and Algorithms (DSA) used in the programming and construction software and affecting its performance. Analyzed those DSA which use at least one of them is required to construct and operate any appreciable program

Content

•Introduction, Analysis of Algorithms,

•Mental Data Types

•Alphanumeric (Strings), Vectors,

•Lists, Stacks,

•Queues, Dual Queues,

•Trees, Search Trees,

•Fragmentation tales

•Searching  Algorithms and Orders

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Students’ evaluation comprises of the :

•Theoretical part (60%)  and

• laboratory (40%)

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Recommended Books:

1. [Preiss, Java]  Bruno R. Preiss, «Data Structures and Algorithms with Object-Oriented Design Patterns in Java», 1998.

2. [Sedgewick, Java] Robert Sedgewick, «Algorithms in Java», Third Edition, PARTS 1-4, FUNDAMENTALS DATA STRUCTURES SORTING SEARCHING, 2002.

3. [Sedgewick, C++] Robert Sedgewick, «Algorithms in C++», Third Edition, PARTS 1-4, FUNDAMENTALS DATA STRUCTURES SORTING SEARCHING, 1998

4. Niklaus Wirth, «Algorithms & Data Structures», Prentice-Hal, 1986

 

Webliography

http://www.brpreiss.com/books/opus5/html/book.html

4th Semester

DIGITAL COMMUNICATIONS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Face to face
Weekly Hours:  Lectures 3, Problem solving 1, Laboratory experiments 2
ECTS:  7
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Specific Targets:

Upon completion of the course the student  should be able to:

•Outline the basic components of a typical telecommunications system

•Describe the main digital and analogue modulation techniques within 600 words each

•Distinguish the signal from the carrier.

•Propose suitable transmission medium for the main modulation techniques 

•Calculates the transmission sizes.

•Collaborated with co-students in presentations of the modulation techniques.

Module Description

Description:

The course is an introduction to the concepts of the systems of telecommunications and to the techniques employed for the modulation and the transmission of the telecommunication- signals.

The mathematical formalism of the information theory is the basis for the deep understanding of the modulation theory.

The basic knowledge of the Fourier transform and the phasors are crucial to facilitate the students in understanding and solving problems in Digital Communications.

Wired and wireless communication through their respective configurations and transmission media are among the main issues of the course.

Aim: 

This course aims to introduce students to the basic concepts of digital systems and digital signal modulation, sending and recovery of the original information signal.

General principles of telecommunication systems. Fourier transform and phasors, Basic elements of information theory and code theory- Basic codes. Data compression. Sampling, encoding and data transmission.  Characteristics of wired and wireless transportation of data, bandwidth and channel capacity. Transmission networks,(i.e. coaxial, optical fibers etc). Types of signals, time/frequency representation. Satellite communications. Wireless communications, GSM, DCS, GPRS, UMTS, DECT, TETRA. Methods of A/D and D/A conversion (PAM, PPM, PWM, PCM, and δ). Analogue modulation of analogue signals (AM, FM, PM) and digital signals (ASK, FSK, PSK, QAM, TCM, DMT). Dial-up and xDSL modems. Digital transmission of digital signals (NRZ, RZ, Biphase). Signal multiplexing techniques (FDM, TDM, CDM). Multiple access methods.  PDH and SDH transmission systems. 

EMF and health- Field measurements.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final written exam (60%) comprising: 

Solving basic telecommunications issues, Theoretical understanding answers by Fourier signal analysis, Theoretical understanding of Sample answers, Theoretical understanding responses of analogue and digital modulations

II. Laboratory Practice (40%)

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Recommended Book and Journal Article Resources:

-Books

“Principles of Communication Systems”, Taub & Schilling, McGraw Hill, 2/e. 2009

 “Digital Communications: Fundamentals and Applications”, Bernard Sklar, Pearson Education, 2/e, 2001

 “Digital Communications: Design for the Real World”, Andy Bateman, Addison Wesley,  Prentice Hall, 1998

«Digital and Analog Communication Systems», M.Shanmugam, John Wiley&Sons,  1979

 

-Scientific Journals:

IEEE Communications Magazine  

IEEE WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS

DATABASES

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Face to face
Weekly Hours:  Lectures 2, Problem solving 1, Laboratory experiments 2
ECTS:  5.5
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

This course is intended to provide an understanding of the current theory and practice of database management systems, as well, as a solid technical overview of database management systems. In addition to technical concerns, more general issues are emphasized. These include data independence, integrity, security, recovery, performance, database design principles, and database administration. Upon completion of this class, students should be able to:

 

•Employ design methodology for databases and verifying their structural correctness

•implement databases and applications software primarily in the relational model

•Use querying languages, primarily SQL, and other database supporting software

•Apply the theory behind various database models and query languages

•Understand the theories and techniques in developing database applications and be able to demonstrate the ability to build databases using DBMS products 

•Implement security and integrity policies relating to databases

•Work in group settings to design and implement database projects

•Understand new developments and trends in databases

Module Description

1.Introduction to Database Systems

2.Data Models

3.Relational Database Modelling

4.Design Theory for Relational Databases

5.High Level Database Models

6.Relational Database Programming

7.The Database Language SQL

8.Advanced SQL

9.Database Design

10.Transactions Management and Concurrency Control

11.Database Optimization

12.Database Administration and Security

13.Distributed Database Management Systems

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination: 60%

Laboratory examination: 40%

Project presentation of up to 20%, towards the written examination 

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Recommended Books:

1.A.Silberschatz, H.F. Korth and S. Sudarshan, 2010, Database System Concepts, 6th Edition, McGraw-Hill

2.G.-Molina H., Ullman J. and Widom J., 2002, Database Systems: The Complete Book", Prentice Hall Inc

3.C.J Date, 2004, An Introduction to Database Systems, 8th Edition, Addison Wesley-Pearson Education Inc

 

DIGITAL SIGNAL PROCESSING

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Face to face
Weekly Hours:  Lectures 2, Laboratory 2
ECTS:  4
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

This course will develop digital signal processing (DSP) theory and methods with the following objectives: 

•Understand the significance of digital signal processing in  multi-media technology, storage and communications. 

•Familiarity with fundamental concepts such as 'linearity' , 'time-invariance',  'impulse response', 'convolution',  'frequency response',  'z-transforms' and the 'discrete time Fourier transform'.  as applied to signal processing systems.

•Knowledge of digital filters and their application to digitised sound and images.

•Understand how FIR and IIR type digital filters: may be designed and implanted in software.    

•Use the "MATLAB" language and "signal processing toolboxes" for designing, implementing and simulating digital signal processing (DSP) operations as applied to speech, music and images..

•Understand analogue/digital conversion as required for the digital processing of analogue signals.

•Understand the discrete Fourier transform (DFT), its applications and its implementation by FFT techniques.  Gain some knowledge of the 2-D FFT and its application to image processing and compression.

Module Description

Theory

1.Introduction: What is signal processing, history of the topic, application examples.

2.Discrete-time (DT) signals: the discrete-time complex exponential, and a computer music synthesis example.

3.Digital Signal Processing and DSP Systems 

4.Model of  DSP Systems

5.Z Transform 

6.Fourier Analysis: The discrete Fourier transform (DFT) and series (DFS).

7. The discrete-time Fourier transform (DTFT). Examples.

8. The fast Fourier transform algorithm (FFT).

9.Linear Filters: Linear time-invariant systems, convolution, ideal and realizable filters. 

10.Filter design and implementation, examples.

11.Interpolation and Sampling: Continuous-time (CT) signals, interpolation, sampling. 

12.The sampling theorem. Processing of CT signals in DT.

13.DSP,  Tools,  DSP and the Future

Laboratory

1.Discrete-Time Signals in the Time Domain

2.Discrete-Time Systems in the Time Domain

3.Discrete-Time Signals in the Frequency Domain

4.LTI Discrete-Time Systems in the Frequency Domain

5.Digital Processing of Continuous-Time Signals

6.Digital Filter Structures

7.Digital Filter Design

8.Digital Filter Implementation

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final exam (40%)

Coursework 20% 

Written lab exams (40%)

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Recommended Book and Journal Article Resources:

1.Advanced Topics in Digital Signal Processing, by John G. Proakis, Charles Rader, and Fuyun Ling, Prentice Hall, 1992 

2.Analog and Digital Filter Design Using C (Book/Disk), 1/e , by Leslie D. Thede , Prentice Hall, 1996 

3.Digital Signal Processing , by Oppenheim, Prentice Hall, 1988 

4.Signals and Systems Laboratory With Matlab by Palamides A., Veloni  A., CRC Press, 2010

 

COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE II

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:

 Theory and Practice Exercise: in Auditorium

 Laboratory Sessions: in Laboratory Room

Weekly Hours:  Theory 3, Practice Exercises 1, Laboratory 2
ECTS:  7
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the semester, students must be able:

-To describe the structure of a Computer, name its main parts, draw its block diagram and its connection with External Devices 

-To explain the way a Computer execute programs and communicate with External Devices  

-To list Computer basic communication modes with External Devices and explain the way they are implemented 

-To highlight the significance of each Computer part and explain its role in the Computer operation 

-To discuss about Computer technical characteristics and their impact to the Computer performance

-To compose programs suitable to import data from an External Device into the Computer, sorting them or perform calculations and export to another External Device the results 

-To examine and analyze the way Computer components are interconnected and connected to External Devices  

-To examine and analyze software problems, solve them using computing and/or algorithmic methods and generalize conclusions to apply them to similar cases  

-To integrate knowledge of different domains such as Electronics, Boolean Algebra, Programming, etc. to compose an extended and in-depth view of Computer    

-To evaluate a Computer technical characteristics assess their impact to communication with External Devices and rate its overall performance  

Module Description

Architecture of modern processors. Buses, memory systems (categories, features, management), interface peripheral devices (types, interface techniques). Interrupt techniques and DMA. Low-level software. Microcomputer systems (architecture, low-level software) buses, basic input-output units (typical characteristics). Application development for the management of the microcomputer system units.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Theory: Written examination at the end of the semester

Laboratory: Interim and final exam. Oral examination of Exercises

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Recommended Book and Journal Article Resources:

1.W. Stallings, «Computer Organization and Architecture», Prentice Hall, 2000.

Tom Shanley, «The Unabridged Pentium 4», Addison Wesley, 2005.

CONTROL SYSTEMS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Face to face
Weekly Hours:  Lectures 2, Problem solving 1, Labs 2
ECTS:  5.5
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Students will be able to:

•understand the basic fundamental of linear control theory. 

•model a simple dynamic LTI system using a transfer function representation and a state-variable representation.

•calculate the closed-loop control system transfer function from a block diagram representation of the feedback system.

•analyze and quantify the time-response of linear dynamic systems.

•represent desired system performance in mathematical form.

•check the stability of linear dynamic systems using the Routh-Hurwitz criterion.

•simulate the time-response of a linear system using MATLAB and SIMULINK.

•design a P, PD, PI, and PID automatic controller for a simple linear system to achieve desired system performance.

• determine the phase margin and gain margin to design a controller for a simple system using frequency response technique.

•use MATLAB/SIMULINK as a computer-aided design tool to synthesize an automatic controller that will achieve a desired system performance.

Module Description

The following gives a list of topics, covered in the course :

Theory

•Overview of control systems

•System modeling in the frequency domain

•System modeling in the time domain

•Block diagram representation of systems

•Time response analysis of linear systems

•Simulation of linear systems using MATLAB/SIMULINK

•Stability analysis of linear systems

•Second order approximation of third order systems.

•Steady-state error specification and analysis

•Root locus design technique

•Proportional, Integral and Derivative (PID) control design

•Frequency domain analysis 

•Design via frequency response

Laboratory

•Control of a physical process. State estimation based on data from a physical process.

•Extensive use of Matlab for computer-aided controller design.

•Simulation of dynamical systems using programs as Simulink, Ctrllab, Comprehensive Control (CC), Simapp,  Scilab, Xcos, Simview,  Pcusim.

•Programming with LabVIEW software.

•Feedback control of DC and stepper motors.

•PLC PORTION OF THE LABORATORY.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final exam (40%)

Coursework(20%)

Written lab exams (40%)

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Recommended Book and Journal Article Resources:

1.Α. Veloni - Α. Palamides, Control Systems Problems: Formulas - ,Matlab® and Solutions, CRC Press, USA 2011, ISBN-13: 9781439868508- ISBN: 1439868506

2.Ogata, Katsuhiko: "Modern Control Engineering (5th Edition)", Prentice-Hall, Inc., 2009 (ISBN: 0-13-615673-8) (Main Textbook)

3.Goodwin, Graham, Graebe Stefan, Salgado, Mario: Control System Design", Prentice-Hall, Inc., 2001 (ISBN: 0-13-958653-9)

4.Astrom, Karl and Murray, Richard: Feedback Systems: An Introduction for Scientists and  Engineers", Princeton University Press, 2008 (ISBN: 0-691-13576-2)

5.Norman Nise, Control Systems Engineering, John Wiley & Sons, Fourth Edition, 2004. 

TECHNICAL TERMINOLOGY IN ENGLISH

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Face to face
Weekly Hours:  Lectures 2, Problem solving 1, Laboratory experiments 2
ECTS:  
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

 

Module Description

 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

 

Recommended or required Bibliography

 

5th Semester

COMPUTER NETWORKS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Face to face
Weekly Hours:  Lectures 2, Laboratory experiments 2
ECTS:  5
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The learning outcomes of the theoretical part are the following:

•describe the principles of data network operation

• planning and support modern computer networks

• distinguish the topologies and networks types.

• Implement asynchronous and synchronous serial transmission.

•they apply technical multiplexing packets and physical transport medium access

•Describe the architectural OSI and TCP / IP and circuit switched techniques, message - packet.

•Explain the link layer protocols, and protocols IPv4, IPv6, UDP, TCP, ARP, RARP, ICMP, H.323, SIP, BOOTP, DHCP, NAT, IGMP, DVMRP, MOSPF, PIM

•Recommend IP addressing, network classes, masks, subnets, broadcast and multicast

•Develop algorithms routing RIP, OSPF, BGP.

•Develop the MONE network and the sdr, vat, rat, vic tools.

•Recommend xDSL, WLAN, VPNas data access technologies,.

•Support tunneling technologies: MPLS, IPsec, IPinIP, L2TP, GRE

Module Description

Purpose:

The purpose of the course is for the students to understand the principles of operation of the data network and acquire the skills to design implement and maintain modern computer networks

Content

 Historical Backround (Arpanet, sita, bitnet etc.) network topologies: star, loop, bus. Network types: LAN, WAN, MAN. Asynchronous and synchronous serial transmission.

Technical multiplexing packages and physical transport medium access: TDMA, ALOHA, SLOTTTED ALOHA, CSMA/CD, reservation ALOHA, reservation TDMA, Token Ring. Adaptive protocol URN.

Wireless LAN. The IEEE 802.x models. The OSI and TCP architectures.

Circuit switching techniques, message - packet.

Virtual circuits and datagrams.

Link Layer Protocols(LAPB,PPP,HDLC). X.25 protocols and Frame Relay.

Integrated Services Digital Network(ISDN).ATM networks. The Ethernet network and the IPv4 and IPv6 protocols.

Addressing IP, network classes, masks, subnet, broadcast and multicast.

The ARP,RARP,ICMP protocols. The UDP and TCP protocols.

Formulation interfaces DTE-DCE, active network elements: hu, switches, routers. Structured wiring. Routing algorithms RIP,OSPF,GP. The DNS service. The OOTP, DHCP protocols. proxies and the NAT protocol.

The telnet, ftp, tftp, smtp, pop3, imap protocols and applications.

Techniques and IGMP,DVMRP,MOSPF, PIM multitasking protocols.

The VoIP service and the H.323 and SIP protocols.

Access details technologies xDSL, WLAN. Virtual private networks - VPN.

Tunneling Technologies: MPLS, IPsec, IPinIP, L2TP, GRE. Quality of service - QoS.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Students’ evaluation comprises of the :

•Final exam  (60%)  and

• laboratory (40%)

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Recommended Books:

1.Christian Huitema, “Routing in the Internet”, Prentice Hall, ISBN:0-13-132192-7, 1995.

 

DIGITAL CONTROL SYSTEMS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Face to face
Weekly Hours:  Lectures 2, Problem solving 1, Labs 2
ECTS:  5
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The students should be able to:

 use ordinary differential equations and Laplace transformation to model physical systems, 

•obtain dynamic responses of linear systems and determine their stability, 

• construct root-locus and Bode plots, and apply Nyquist criterion in the context of controller design, 

•obtain and manipulate state-space representation of dynamical systems using linear algebra, and 

•become fluent in digital control systems design. 

Module Description

1. Introduction to feedback and digital feedback control. 

2. Digital controllers as difference equations, solution of difference equations. 

3. Forced response in digital equations.

4. Laplace transforms, solution of difference equations using z transforms. 

5. Block diagram manipulation, finding system response using z transfer functions. 

6. Converting continuous elements following zero order holds to digital form, behavior between samples, closed loop difference equation.

7. Predicting closed loop response of digital control systems with digital controllers and continuous plants.

8. Stability of digital control systems. 

9. State space models of digital control systems. 

10. State transition matrix. 

11. Frequency Response Methods.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final exam (60%)

Written lab exams (40%)

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Recommended Book and Journal Article Resources:

1.Ogata Katsuhiko, Discrete-Time Control Systems, 2nd Edition, Prentice-Hall, 1995. (QA402.G34 1995) 

2.Franklin Gene F, Powell J David and Workman Michael L, Digital Control of Dynamic Systems, 3rd Edition, Ellis-Kagle Press, 2006. (ISBN: 978-0-9791226-0-6). 

3.Astrom Karl Johan and Wittenmark Bjorn, Computer-Controlled Systems: Theory and Design, 3rd Edition, Prentice-Hall, 1997. (TJ213.A859 1997) 

4.Phillips Charles L and Nagle H Troy, Digital Control System Analysis and Design, 3rd Edition, Prentice-Hall, 1995. (TJ223.M53P558 1995)

 

MICROCONTROLLERS DEVELOPMENT

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Face to face
Weekly Hours:  Lectures 2, Problem solving 1, Laboratory experiments 2
ECTS:  
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Students, after finishing this course,  will be able to:

•Describe the development of computer systems.

•Develop programs for computer systems.

•Develop programs and be able to establish communication between computers using the serial port RS-232 using Assembly, C or Visual Basic programming languages.

•Describe electronic elements and peripheral devices connected to the computer, in order to take control of them.

•Design electronic elements such as relays, diodes, transistors, keypads, LCD displays, stepper motors and magnetic card readers.

•Describe 8-bit microcontrollers of MCS-51 family.

•Describe 16-bit microcontrollers of MCS-96 intel family. 

Module Description

Goal:

This course main goal is to allow students to understand how the computer hardware factions, to gain knowledge for the development the programming of such computer systems.

Description:

Application programs and communication, using RS-232, with computer systems, which primary use microcontrollers, by using Assembly, C and Visual Basic programming languages. Describe of electronic elements and peripheral devices in order to archive control, such as analog to digital converters A / D and digital-to-analog, RS transducers-232, RS-422 / RS-485 to TTL and vice versa, relays, diodes, transistors, keypads, LCD displays, stepper motors, magnetic readers cards etc. Describe of 8-digit microcontrollers of MCS-51 family of Intel and other manufacturers' compatible with them. Describe of the 16-digit microcontrollers of Intel MCS-96 family.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written final exam (60%).

Laboratory exercises (40%).

Recommended or required Bibliography

-Recommended Books :

All provided books are in Greek 

The student may use any relevant textbook from the Internet

WEB APPLICATIONS DEVELOPMENT

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Face to face
Weekly Hours:  Lectures 2, Laboratory experiments 2
ECTS:  5
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Students, after finishing this course,  will be able to:

•Develop applications and models using applied internet technologies.

•Understand concepts such as Servers - www Servers, Browsers - web Browsers. 

•Describe infrastructure models  (client-server, multi-tier, applets-servlets). Develop elements of: web and databases servers and use programming languages such as HTML, CSS, D-HTML, PHP, MySQL, XML, Javascript, BOM, DOM, AJAX, JQuery for internet applications.

•Development of applications and models using internet technologies.

•Support of portals, e-commerce, e-business, e-learning.

•Understand and indentify security issues and protocols of systems. 

Module Description

Goal:

To course aims to familiarize students with the development of modern applications and models using current Internet technology, which make use of open source platforms.

Description:

The Internet (Internet) and the World Wide Web (WWW). Servers - www Servers.

www Browsers. Apache Web Server. Describe the infrastructure models (client-server, multi-tier, applets-servlets) and developed the elements of the two basic types of servers: web and database servers. Emphasis is given to the presentation of the most important technologies and programming languages ​​for development - implementation of web applications such as HTML, CSS, D-HTML, PHP, MySQL, XML, Javascript, BOM, DOM, AJAX, JQuery Development of distributed applications and models that use Internet technologies. Presented the main elements of distributed applications and the basic characteristics of systems used in distributed models such as portals (digital gateways) e-commerce systems (e-commerce), electronic business (e-business), electronic learning (e-learning), e conference etc. and discussed security issues, principles and design standards of these systems.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written final exam (60%).

Laboratory exercises (40%).

Recommended or required Bibliography

-Recommended Books :

1.Mohammed J. Kabir, “Apache Server 2 - bible”, ISBN: 0-7645-4821-2, Hungry Minds Inc. 2002.

2.J.Greenspan & B.Bulger, “MySQL / PHP Database Applications”, ISBN: 0-7645-4760-7, M&T

Books, 2001.

Elliotte Rusty Harold, “XML Bible”, ISBN: 0-7645-4760-7, Hungry Minds Inc. 2001.

OPERATING SYSTEMS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Face to face
Weekly Hours:  Lectures 2, Laboratory experiments 2
ECTS:  5
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Students should be able to:

•Analyze the CPU time management and Central Memory. 

•Describe the enlarged memory devices, and virtual memory.

•Describe the coordinated scheduling processes and strategies to exploit the availability of the main resources (such as time and memory).

•Develop the User Interface

•Develop OS.

•Organize and Pseudo Parallel Parallelism.

•Manage the physical memory.

•Manage the virtual memory.

Module Description

Goal:

Introduction to the basic principles and mechanisms of operation and coordination of a PC using important infrastructure programs both for the user prospect (holding) and for the system side (exploitation). The OS provides the software interface to the hardware with the PC architecture through which enables the engineer to control and exploit material in order to achieve maximum benefit of the user. At the same time the operating system manages system resources, hardware and / or software status, between users, their programs and the system. It analyzes the time of CPU Management and Central Memory also expanded memory mechanisms are analyzed, such as virtual memory, including cache. It analyzes, coordinated scheduling processes and strategies in order to exploit the availability of main resources (such as time and memory) to avoid extremes situations

Description:

History, Design Principles, User Interface, Structures HCG, HCG Implementation Processes - Yarn, Coordination,  Parallel and Pseudo parallel execution, resource management, physical memory organization, real memory management, virtual memory, and the management, scheduling processes, Deadlocks.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written final exam (60%).

Laboratory exercises (40%).

Recommended or required Bibliography

-Recommended Books :

1.Silberschatz etc., «Applied Operating Systems Concept».8η έκδοση, 2008

2.Gary Nutt, «Operating Systems, 3η έκδοση, Addison Wesley 2003

Crowley, «Operating Systems - A Design Oriented Approach,  Tata McGraw-Hill, 2001

DIGITAL DESIGN WITH VHDL & FPGA

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Face to face
Weekly Hours:  Lectures 2, Laboratory experiments 2
ECTS:  5
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The learning outcomes of the theoretical part are the following:

•Identify the modern development and design of digital systems, develop software using VHDL

•Examine programmable logic devices (PLDs), CPLDs

•Develop provisions field programmable gateway (FPGA)

•Compose models for various cutting edge technologies (ASICs)

•Organize structured methodology to the design of very large systems

•Explain the Modeling Combinatorial and Sequential Logic

•Pose Modern and Asynchronous Sequential Circuits

•Organize modeling and arithmetic units

•Support the Optimal Implementation and Control Logic Circuits

Module Description

Purpose:

The purpose of the course is the presentation of modern development and design of digital systems, and the implementation and simulation of using VHDL.

Content:

Introduction of modern technologies for implementing digital circuits: SSI, Semi-custom, Full-Custom and particularly in programmable logic devices (PLDs), CPLDs and field programmable gate arrays (FPGA). Synthesis of models for various cutting-edge technologies designed for specific applications: application specific integrated circuits (ASICs). Introduction of modern programming languages ​​of description hardware circuits, Data Objects, Commands conforming assignment, project entities in VHDL language, process command, component command. Introduction to learning the VHDL language. Structured methodology to the design of very large systems. Modeling Combinatorial and sequential logic. Modern and Asynchronous Sequential Circuits. Modeling of arithmetic units and Memory Channel. Implementation and control logic optimization. Synthesis with VHDL.

VHDL & FPGA Design Auto Workshop

The purpose of Laboratory VHDL & FPGA is:

The students’ acquaintance with the FPGAs (Field Programmable Gate Array) devices.

Learning the VHDL language and its uses in modern industry

To acquaint the student with the VHDL language through the creation of applications in computer language

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Students’ evaluation comprises of the :

•Final exam  (60%)  and

• laboratory (40%)

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Recommended Books:

1.Salcic Z. & Smailagic A., "Digital System Design & Prototyping Using FPGA & HDL", Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2000.

2.Parhami B., "Computer Arithmetic: Algorithms and Hardware Designs", Oxford Uiv. Press, 1999.

3.Hayes J., "Computer Architecture and Organization", Mc Graw-Hil, 3rd Edition, 1998

4.Salcic, “VHDL and FPLDs”, Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1998

5.Hennessy J.-Patterson D., “Computer Architecture: A Quantative Approach", Morgan Kaufmann Publishers, 2nd Edition, 1996.

 

ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Face to face
Weekly Hours:  Lectures 2, Laboratory experiments 2
ECTS:  5
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The specific course is an introduction to basic concepts of air pollution, pollution control and abatement technologies, quality of atmospheric indoor and outdoor environment, etc. As the time passes, the courses deepen in more specialized knowledge and concepts that require ability and skills development from the students, both understanding and use of new technologies.

The courses deal with the problems (directly and indirectly) that affect the people due to air pollution (adverse health effects, adverse constructions effects, etc) as well as to the actions to manage these problems. This course is also a technological analysis on issues and problems related to air pollution.

The purpose of the course is the understanding of the importance of the quality of the atmospheric environment, the concepts of air pollution control and abatement technologies, and the development of an ecological consciousness, a consciousness that is closely linked to environmental protection, a potentially active and thoughtful citizen and scientist.

Upon completion of the course, students will have:

•They have acquired the knowledge and the understanding of issues related to air pollution and the quality of the atmospheric environment in general. Be able to describe relevant concepts and to identify the causes-sources that cause problem in the quality of the atmospheric environment.

•Be able to perceive, interpret and clearly explain issues related to air pollution, to generalize the problem, to correctly appreciate in order to make right conclusions.

•Be able to use all the concepts related to air pollution, to provide new calculations, to be able to correctly classify the causes of the various problems and generate new knowledge, while gaining implementation experience.

•To have the ability to analyze the problems of air pollution and degradation of the atmospheric environment in probably components so that they can combine, design, develop and implement both old and innovative technologies in order to tackle these problems.

•Be able to revise old views related to air pollution and its treatment, so they can create new knowledge. Also, be able to compose and organize working groups and propose solutions.

•Have a proven critical ability so they can compare and evaluate different statements on the quality of the atmospheric environment (for example, high concentrations of particulate matter from anthropogenic activities and dust transport from the Sahara-Sahara Dust event).

•Be able to participate in measuring-experimental procedures. Be able to know to handle suitable measuring devices and also to be able to evaluate the measurements results in order to judge situations correctly, proposing in each case the appropriate solution.

•Be able to work with their fellow students, to create and present both at individual and group level a case study from its initial stages up to the final evaluation and finally to be able to propose new ideas and solutions.

More specifically, students will be able to:

•Search, analysis and synthesis of data and information using and applying the required technologies

•Decision Making

•Autonomous work

•Teamwork

•Working in an international environment

•Working in a multidisciplinary environment

•Production of new research ideas

•Respect for the natural environment

•Ability of both criticism and self-criticism

•Promotion of free, creative and inductive thinking

Module Description

Theory:

The core modules of the course include:

•Description of the atmosphere - Solar radiation - Air pollution - Flashback to evolution of the air pollution problem - Air pollution sources - Air pollutants (carbon monoxide - sulphur dioxide - nitrogen oxides - surface ozone - hydrocarbons - aerosols).

•Impact of photochemical pollution - Factors affecting the air pollution problem - Temperature inversion - Cleaning processes of atmosphere - Air pollution episodes - Air pollution in greater Athens area - Air Pollution and bioclimate - Assessment of atmospheric environmental quality indicators - Indoor pollution - Immediate treatment concepts and environmental data presentation.

Laboratory:

The workshop includes the following laboratory exercises:

•Introduction – Targets and laboratory procedures.

•Meteorological station.

•Introduction to statistical analysis and treatment of meteorological and environmental data sets.

•Bioclimatic Indices.

•Presentation of student work.

•Educational visit.

•Particulate matters monitor Aerocet 531.

•Environmental Indices.

•Pollutant Standard Index (PSI).

•Air Quality Index (AQI).

•European Regional Pollution Index (ERPI).

•Final presentation of student work.

•Evaluation.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final written examination for the theoretical part of the course: 60%.

Continuous evaluation and final examination for the Laboratory part: 40%.

Recommended or required Bibliography

International Bibliography: 

•Boubel, R.W., Fox, D.L., Turner, D.B. and Stern, A.C. (1994). Fundamentals of air pollution, 3rd Edition, Academic Press (ISBN: 0-12-118930-9).

Vallero, D.A. (2008). Fundamentals of air pollution, 4th Edition, Academic Press (ISBN: 978-0-12-373615-4).

6th Semester

SYSTEMS KERNEL PROGRAMMING

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Face to face
Weekly Hours:  Lectures 2, Problem solving 1, Laboratory experiments 2
ECTS:  5.5
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Students should be able to:

•Acknowledge peripheral devices.

• Understand the basic principles of designing software interface.

•Choose file systems in combination with the efficient management of storage space in order to organize regional permanent commemoration units.

•Set the maximum availability, exclusivity and privacy.

Module Description

Goal:

Exploring the software interface of peripherals PC storage units through which enables the engineer to control and exploit the hardware in order to achieve maximum benefit for the user. Various file systems in combination with the efficient management of storage facilities peripherals permanent commemoration and methods are discussed in order to ensure maximum availability, exclusivity and privacy.

Description: 

Basic Structures OS, Definition peripherals, basic software interface design principles, device drivers, file systems, user interface, security and protection, system performance basic software interface design principles, device drivers, file systems, user interface, system performance.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written final exam (60%).

Laboratory exercises (40%).

Recommended or required Bibliography

-Recommended Books :

1.Silberschatz etc., «Applied Operating Systems Concept».8η έκδοση, 2008 

 

ROBOTICS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Face to face
Weekly Hours:  Lectures 2, Problem solving 1, Laboratory experiments 2
ECTS:  5.5
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Students should be able to:

•Understand the structure and operation of an industrial robot.

•Develop industrial robotic applications.

•Examines Kinematic and dynamic analysis of robotic arms.

• Trajectory planning.

•Controlling of robots and intelligent robot.

•Composing of sensor systems in robotics.

•Examine the Engineering point of view in robotics.

•Apply robot programming languages.

Module Description

Goal:

The course goal is to familiarize students with the fundamentals of robotics science which is a constantly evolving, contemporary and "inclusive" science with a significant impact in all areas of human activity.

Emphasis is given to the description and analysis of industrial robots, which are a key tool in all modern industrial production units.

Description:

Introduction to robotics. Structure and function of the basic units of an industrial robot. Applications of robotics in industry and elsewhere. Kinematic and dynamic analysis of robotic arms. Trajectory Design. Control of robots. Intelligent robots. Sensory systems in robotics. Computer vision and robotics. Programming languages of the robots.

Laboratory:

SCARA I και ΙΙ

VISION I Και ΙΙ

Προσομοίωση

ΜΑ2000

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written final exam (60%).

Laboratory exercises (40%).

Recommended or required Bibliography

-Recommended Books :

1.L. Sciavicco, B. Siciliano, “Modeling and Control of Robot Manipulators”, McGraw, 1996.

2.C. Canudas de Wit, B. Siciliano, and G. Bastin, “Theory of Robot Control”, Springer, 1996

3.P.J. McKerrow “Introduction to Robotics”, Addison Wesley, Reading MA, 1991

4.R. J. Schilling, "Fundamentals of Robotics: Analysis and Control", Prentice-Hall International,1990

5.T. Yoshikawa, "Foundations of Robotics - Analysis and Control", MIT Press 1990.

6.M. W. Spong, M. Vdyasagar, "Robot Dynamics and Control", John Wiley & Sons, Inc, 1989

7.J. J. Craig, "Introduction to Robotics:Mechanics and Control", Addison Wesley, 1986

 

SECURITY AND MANAGEMENT OF COMPUTER SYSTEMS AND NETWORKS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Face to face
Weekly Hours:  Lectures 2, Laboratory experiments 2
ECTS:  
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Students should be able to:

• Describe the management of a network,

• Explains services included in a network,

• Explains Essential functions and components of the network core

• Examines Attacks on a network and its applications,

• Creates the network protection,

• Control the access and authentication (AAA).

• Distinguish the basic concepts and definitions of cryptography and security

• Explains Cryptography Public and Private Key

• Manages Symmetric and Asymmetric Cryptography. Access Control. Identification and Management combines vulnerabilities and attacks.

• Planning applications (e-banking and e-payments, e-government and e-voting).

Module Description

Goal:

The course goal is to familiarize students with the basic principles and

Services of an internet provider and encryption algorithms as well as their familiarity with security testing tools and management of these services.

Description

Managing a network, what management needs exist in a network and at what levels Services included in a network, applications and functions performed. Reference to DNS services, SMTP, POP, IMAP, WEB, FTP, NTP, LDAP, DialUP. Necessary functions and components of the core network (routing protocols, Firewalls, VPN, etc.). Attacks on a network and the applications, categories of attacks and effects on network operation. Network protection, protection in the operating system level, service protection. access control and authentication (AAA). Methods of control and management to monitor the safety and smooth running of a network and its services (SNMP, MIBs, NMS-OpenView, NetSight, RMON). Basic concepts and definitions of cryptography and security. Public Key Cryptography, description and definitions (DES, 3DES, etc.). Private Key cryptography (RSA, El Gamal, etc.). Symmetric and Asymmetric Cryptography. Access Control. Identification and Authentication (Message Authentication Code, passwords, biometric techniques, smart cards, access control lists). Public key infrastructure, digital signatures (hash functions, certificates, certification services). Examples of logging, syslog services, log collectors, log analysis, command line tools, nslookup, snmp-based tools. Intrusion Detection Systems. Manage vulnerabilities and attacks, application description (e-banking and e-payments, e-government and e-voting.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written final exam (60%).

Laboratory exercises (40%).

Recommended or required Bibliography

-Recommended Books :

1.Stuart McClure, Joel Scambray, George Kurtz, “Hacking ExposedT M 6th Ed.

2.Strebe Matthew, “Network Security Foundations”, ISBN: 0782143741, Sybex, 2004.

3.Ross & Morgan, “Network Security Essentials”, ISBN: 0764525034, J. Wiley & Sons Inc., 2003. 

4.Fischer-Hubner, “IT Security & Privacy: Design & use of PR”, ISBN:3540421424, Springer, 2001.

5.Cheswick, “Firewalls and Internet Security”, ISBN:0-201-63357-4, Addison Wesley, 1994.

6.William Stallings, “SNMP, SNMPv2, and CMIP- The practical Guide to Network Management Standards”,ISBN: 0-201-63331-0, Addison-Wesley, 1993.

 

COMPILERS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Face to face
Weekly Hours:  Lectures 3, Labs 2
ECTS:  5.5
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course, students will be able to :

•Explain the differences between a compiler and an interpreter and also to describe how these programs work.

•Be able to build lexical analyzers and use them in the construction of parsers.

•Express the grammar of a programming language.

•Build syntax analyzers and use them in the construction of parsers.

•Perform the operations of semantic analysis.

•Build a code generator.

•Discuss the merits of different optimization schemes

Module Description

The main purpose of the course is the understanding of  general structure and operation of modern compilers, both theoretical and practical level. The following gives a list of topics, covered in the course :

Theory

Introduction to computer languages and compilers

Finite Automata and Regular Expressions

Context-Free Grammar and Syntax Analysis

Top-Down Parsing

Bottom-up Parsing

Syntax-Directed Definitions and Translations

Symbol Table Management

Run-time environment

Intermediate Code Generation

Code Optimization

Code Generation

JIT Compiler

Parallel Execution

Lab

A Simple Scanner

Lecical Analysis (finite automata)

Lecical Analysis (regular expressions)

Syntax analysis  (LL parsers)

Syntax analysis  (bottom-up parsers)

Syntax analysis  (LR parsers)

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final exam (50%)

Presence on lectures (10%)

Written lab exams (40%)

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Recommended Book:

1."Compilers: Principles, Techniques, and Tools", A. Aho (etc), ISBN: 9780321486813, Addison Wesley/USA, 2006

 

Journal Article Resources

Journal of Functional Programming, http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=JFP

MULTIMEDIA AND COMPUTER GRAPHICS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Face to face
Weekly Hours:  Lectures 2, Laboratory experiments 2
ECTS:  4.5
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The learning outcomes of the theoretical part are the following:

•Students of the department to acquire the capacity to: describe the basic principles of two-dimensional imaging and three-dimensional graphics with H / PC,

•combine basic composition principles

• apply digital multimedia delivery technologies (multimedia) content (text, sound, image, animation, video)

Module Description

Purpose:

The course aims at teaching the basic principles of two-dimensional imaging and three-dimensional graphics with H / PC and the principles governing the composition of applications that utilize digital multimedia delivery technologies (multimedia) content (text, sound, image, animation, video).

Content:

Codes and text digitization methods, image, sound. Systems and models

determining color, colored text and color graphics. Standardization of image files, video, audio. Bit mapped and vectorized image files. Algorithms dithering. Animation.

Compression methods. Display devices, digitization and storage media. Coordinate Systems. The algorithm Bresenhmam for drawing line segments.

Two-dimensional and three-dimensional geometric shapes. Smoothing Methods. Geometric shapes Transformations. Linear, nonlinear and random Fractals. texture mapping (texture mapping), lighting and shading methods and three-dimensional scene features models (rendering). Composition and sync multimedia presentation, programming language SMIL. Composition data VR and with programming language VRML. IDEs multimedia applications. Electronic transmission of multimedia data, and streaming technologies.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

 Students’ evaluation comprises of the Theoretical part (60%) 

 Laboratory (40%)

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Recommended Books:

1.“Real networks production guide”, Real Network, 2002.

2.Gilbert Held and Thomas R. Marshall, “Data Compression”, John Wiley & sons.

3.Nigel Chapman and & Jenny Chapman, “Digital Multimedia”, John Wiley & Sons, ISBN: 0471983861, 2000.

4.Tay Vaughan, “Multimedia: Making it Work”, McGraw-Hill Osborne Media; 6th edition, 2003.

5.W. M. Newman, R. F. Sproull, “Principles of Interactive Computer Graphics”, Mc Graw- Hill, 1986.

6.S. Harrington, “Computer Graphics”, Mc Graw-Hill, 1987.

7.J. Neider, T. Davis, M. Woo, “Open GL Programming Guide”, Addison-Wesley, 1993.

8.R. Hollands, “The Virtual Reality”, ed. by John Wiley & sons , ISBN: 0471958719, 1996.

9.ISO/IEC WD 14772, “The Virtual Reality Modeling Language Specification”, Ver. 2.0, 1996.

 

SENSORS-MEASUREMENTS & INDUSTRIAL CONTROL

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  In the class interacting with the other students face to face.
Weekly Hours:  Lectures 2, Laboratory experiments 2
ECTS:  4.5
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course the student / her will be able to:

• Explain TIE basic concepts of industrial automation

• Describe Sensors Physical structure, design, construction,

• Develop Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition Systems

• Networking Electronic Control Units.

• Support interface protocols of electronic control units (CAN), (LIN), FlexRay and (MOST)

• Explain the architecture, operation, applications and programming of PLC

• Develop building automation systems

Module Description

THEORETICAL SECTION

The theory of the course is structured into the following sections

1) Introduction / Overview of basic industrial automation / control concepts

2) Sensors: Physical structure, design, construction, operating principles and applications

3) Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition systems (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition Systems -SCADA

4) Networking Electronic Control Units. Interface protocols of electronic control units with emphasis on: Controller Area Network (CAN), Local-Interconnect Network (LIN), FlexRay and Media Oriented Systems Transport (MOST)

5) Programmable logic controllers (Programmable Logic Controllers-PLC): architecture, operation, applications and programming PLC

6) Building Automation Systems. Technologies, architectures, platforms and specialized electrical / electronics networking protocols and services for the automation functions and the remote control

LABORATORY SECTION

We deal with simple sensors on the market and circuits that use them in different applications. We focus on the study of the response of the sensors (such as selectivity, operating limits) and explain the basis of the particular features of the design / their technology. Using Labview program dealing with logging to a PC measurement we receive and their further exploitation

As for the Industrial Control focus on the most widespread network for this purpose, the CAN bus. After studying the basic principles of operation, tinker with development boards of Microchip, which connect microcontrollers to the CAN network.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Students’ evaluation comprises of the Theoretical part (60%) 

Laboratory (40%)

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Recommended Books:

1) Electrical Measurements, Volume I Classical measurements, N. I. Theodorou, N. Athanasopoulos-S. Athanasopoulos Co., 2000

2) A. Birbilis, "Electronic Measurements and Components Theory" TTIO, STEF, TEI ATHENS, 2000.

3) P.Elgar, "Measurement and control Sensors", Prentice Hall, 1999.

4) George Stephanopoulos, Chonghun Han., "Intelligent systems in process engineering: paradigms from design and operations", Academic Press, 1996.

5) Robert King, "Industrial Control" Papasotiriou editions, 1996

6) S. Brian Morris, "Automated Manufacturing Systems Actuators, Controls, Sensors and Robotics", McGraw Hill, 1995

 

7th Semester

SOFTWARE ENGINEERING

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Face to face
Weekly Hours:  Lectures 2, Laboratory 2
ECTS:  4.5
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this class, students should be able to:

•Analyze a problem, and identify and define the computing requirements appropriate to its solution.

•Plan, analyze, design, implement, evaluate and maintain a software system, to meet the system requirements utilizing best practices.

•Participate productively on software project teams involving member from a variety of disciplines

•Communicate effectively through oral and written reports, and software documentation

•Understand of professional, ethical, legal, security and social issues and responsibilities

Module Description

1.Building a System, 

2.Engineering of Software, Profession and Ethics, Principle of Software Engineering

3.Software Process Models

4.New and Emerging Methodologies

5.Requirements Engineering

6.Design: Architecture and Methodology

7.Design Characteristics and Metrics

8.Implementation

9.Testing and quality Assurance

10.Configuration Management, Integration and Builds

11.Software support and Maintenance

12.Software project Management

13.Contemporary issues with software, Security, Obfuscation, Validation, Verification

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination: 60%

Laboratory examination: 40%

Project presentation of up to 20%, towards the written examination

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Recommended Books:

1.F. Tsui, O. Karam, B. Bernal, 2013, Essentials οf Software Engineering, 3rd Edition, Jones & Bartlett Learning.

2.R. Pressman, B. Maxim, 2014, Software Engineering: A Practitioner's Approach 8th Edition, McGraw-Hill  

3.R. Stephens, Beginning Software Engineering, 2015, 1st Edition, Wrox

 

PROJECT MANAGEMENT

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  In class face to face
Weekly Hours:  Lectures 2, Laboratory Practice 2
ECTS:  5
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The aim of the course is to develop skills for active participation in planning and project management. The provision of the necessary supplies for the effective approach techno-economic issues, the management of a project as a whole, from the conception, the design, the use of specific planning tools for project monitoring, financial study on the financing, the control of individual stages, the writing of project procurement, and final presentation of the project to the community, market.

Upon successful completion of the course students will be able to:

•Identify the basic and critical features of a project, portfolio, program

¥Distinguish the available tools and project management techniques and how they are used to ensure the successful completion of projects on time and within budget

¥distinguish the main roles in a project and appreciate the role of stakeholders in the project.

¥Select project management methodologies 

¥Identify key elements such as critical path, dependencies and a realistic timetable.

¥Analyze and calculate the basic cost of the project elements and connecting them with the project schedule.

¥Evaluate the progress of projects and their deviations from the original planning

¥Develop software where appropriate

¥Compose sources provided by the PMI and PRINCE2

 

Laboratory

Recognize issues in a realistic project scenario. 

Employ work breakdown structures (WBS) in a project application. 

Demonstrate the use of appropriate network scheduling techniques. 

Produce a project proposal. 

Module Description

1:Overview of Project Management, Hype Cycle

2: Project Management Growth,  Concepts and Definitions

3: Organizational Structures used in PM

4: Organizing and Staffing the Project Office and Team

5: Management Functions

6: Time Management; Critical path earlier and slower time, 

7: The Variables for Program Success

8: Working With Executives,  Planning,  

9: Network Scheduling Techniques 

10: Project Graphics, 

11 Risk Management

12: Contract Management

13: Quality Management

14:Resource Management, Management of human resources project

15:Cost and Budget Project. Financial Project Appraisal

16:Technical PERT, Gantt chart

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written final exam (30%) comprising:

- Solving problems related to quantitative data of a project (time, cost, etc.)

- Evaluation theory elements

- Charts

II. Laboratory Practice (40%)

III. Participation in class (10%)

IV. Multiple choice questions from the PMI after 6 weeks (10%)

V. Role Analysis and stakeholders in short case study (10%)

Recommended or required Bibliography

-Recommended Book and Journal Article Resources:

1.Project Management Lite: Just Enough to Get the Job Done…Nothing More, Juana Clark Craig,  9781478129226, 2012

2.Strategic Project Management Made Simple: Practical Tools for Leaders and Teams, Terry Schmidt,  John Wiley, 2009

3.Project Management Absolute Beginner's Guide (3rd Edition), Greg Horine, 3rd, 2012

4.The New One-Page Project Manager:…  , Clark A. Campbell, Mike Campbell, 978-1118378373,  Wiley, 2012

5.Project Management For Dummies , Stanley E. Portny, John Wiley, 2013

6.Project Management For Beginners: Proven Project Management Methods To Complete, Ed Stark, ClydeBank, 2014  

7.A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge: PMBOK, 5th, PMI, 893-7485908328, 2013

8.PRINCE 2, https://www.prince2.com/uk/prince2-examination-format

 

 Journal Article Resources

 

Project Management Journal, 

http://www.pmi.org/learning/publications-project-management-journal.asp

MECHATRONICS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  In the class interacting with the other students face to face.
Weekly Hours:  Lectures 2, Laboratory experiments 2
ECTS:  5.5
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course the student / her will be able to:

•Recognize the function, the applications, the limitations and the basic mechatronic systems design principles.

•Understand the mechanical, electronic and computer parts in production systems and computer integrated industrial systems.

•Analyze the mechanical, electronic and computer parts in production systems

Module Description

Understanding the function, the applications, the limitations and the basic mechatronic systems design principles. Familiarity with mechanical, electronic and computer parts with applications in production systems and computer integrated industrial systems.

Content:

Introduction to mechatronics. Technology background Mechatronics: Digital and Analog signals and systems. Signal processing. Electronics & Power Amplifiers. Filters.

Converters A / D & D / A. Sensors & Actuators. Engines DC, AC, stepper.

Digital Logic. Microprocessor technologies. Embedded systems. Theory

Control. Design controllers. PLC. mechatronic design methodology: Selection

technologies, dynamic modeling, simulation, interface and integration

Systems. Applications.

 

laboratory section

A semester project, that means one mechatronics device

Simple applications on board of Microchip "Mechatronics DemoBoard" (DM163029)

A functioning presentation of CNCRolandEGX-300 machine

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Students’ evaluation comprises of the Theoretical part (60%) 

Laboratory (40%) 

The mechatronic system can also include feedback, that means sensors (closed loop system). Equals engineering (1) + computing (2) + electronics (3), the whole project-exercise  will include: Construction [1] + "brain" (programming) (2)

Recommended or required Bibliography

 - Recommended Books:

1.W. Bolton “Mechatronics: Electronic Control Systems”, 2003

2.Robert H. Bishop, “Modern control systems analysis & design using Matlab and Simulink”, 1997

3.Robert H. Bishop, “The mechatronics handbook, CRC press, 2002

 

DIGITAL IMAGE PROCESSING

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Face to face
Weekly Hours:  Lectures 2, Labs 2
ECTS:  5
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, students will have the ability to:

•Describe the theory and principles of image and video processing techniques

•Illustrate the theory and principles of image and video processing techniques

•Define algorithms for image enhancement and restoration

•Identify image transformations

•Produce image transformations

•Define image coding and compression techniques

•Propose image coding

•Select the appropriate compression technique

•Design software using MATLAB

Module Description

The theoretical part consists of the following topics: 

1.Introduction to image processing principles

2.Image Enhancement

3. Image Restoration

4.Image Morphology

5.Sampling and Quantization

6.Image Transforms

7.Fourier Transform

8.DCT Transform

9.Image Coding (Selective chapters)

10.Image Compression

11.JPEG standard

12.Video coding (Selective chapters)

 

The laboratory work consists of exercises (13 weeks)

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination: 60%

Laboratory exercise: 40%

Homework submission for each laboratory exercise, which is the 20% of the final lab grade. 

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Recommended Book and Journal Article Resources:

1.J. N. Ellinas, «Digital Image and Video Processing», Athens, 2010.

2.R. C. Gonzalez, R. E. Woods, S. L. Eddins, «Digital Image Processing using MATLAB», Prentice Hall, 2004.

3.R. C. Gonzalez, R. E. Woods, «Digital Image Processing», Prentice Hall, 2002.

4.A. Κ. Jain, «Fundamentals of Digital Image Processing», Prentice Hall, 1989.

 

PARALLEL PROCESSING

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Lectures, face to face
Weekly Hours:  Lectures 2, Laboratory 2
ECTS:  4.5
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:

1.Describe a number of different models of parallel and distributed computing and the basic techniques for designing algorithms in these models.

2.Design efficient parallel algorithms and applications;

3.Analyze the requirements for programming parallel systems and critically evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of parallel programming models and how they can be used to facilitate the programming of concurrent systems.

4.Evaluate the efficiency of a parallel processing system and evaluate the types of application for which parallel programming is useful.

5.Write parallel programs for parallel systems, shared address space platforms, and heterogeneous platforms;

6.Make use of the international bibliography for related research problems and results

Module Description

1. Introduction to Parallel Processing

2.Parallel Processing Architecture 

3.Principles of Parallel Programming

4.Software and Hardware for Parallel Processing

 

1. Methods, techniques and networks

2. Parallel programming models and tools

3. Analysis and efficiency of programs

4. Parallel Program Design, Development, and implementation

5. Distributed-Memory Programming with MPI

6. Shared-Memory Programming with OpenMP

7. Advanced OpenMP programming

8. GPU programming

9. Practical problems

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination: 60%

Laboratory exercise: 40%

Optional: Project submission (20% of the final Lectures grade).

Recommended or required Bibliography

-Recommended Book and Journal Article Resources:

1.A.Grama, V. Kumar, A. Gupta, G.Karypis,2003, Introduction to Parallel Computing, Addison Wesley

2.M. J. Quinn,Parallel Programming in C with MPI and OpenMP, 2004, 1st Ed., McGraw Hill

3.M. McCool, J.Reinders, A. Robison,2012, Structured Parallel Programming: Patterns for Efficient Computation, 1st Ed., Morgan Kaufmann

4.D.Serpanos, T. Wolf,2011, Architecture of Network Systems,Morgan-Kaufmann Publishers

 

ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Face to face
Weekly Hours:  Lectures 2
ECTS:  3
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course, students will be able to :

•Understand the basic principles, algorithms and techniques of Artificial Intelligence.

• Judge and decide depending on the problem, the way to represent knowledge.

•Judge and decide depending on the problem, tο choose the appropriate algorithm.

•Implement algorithms of Artificial Intelligence in order to solve known problems.

•Design and implement software with combination of techniques to solve complex problems.

Module Description

The main purpose of the course is the understanding of principles and algorithms of Artificial Intelligence as well as the representation of knowledge and the implementation of intelligent techniques, in order to solve problems. Τhe topics covered in the course are:

1.Introduction to Artificial Intelligence

2.Introduction to Logic and Reasoning

3.Uninformed and Informed Search

4.Knowledge Representation

5.Game playing 

6.Expert Systems

7.Adaptation and Machine Learning

8.Neural Networks

9.Genetic Algorithms

10.Naive Bayes / K-Means

11.Recommendation Systems

12.AI and the Web

13. Applications and Perspectives

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final exam (80%)

Optional project and presentation of up to 40%, less than the proportion of written examination

Presence on lectures (20%)

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Recommended Book and 

1."Artificial Intelligence", I . Vlahavas , P . Kefalas , N . Bassiliades , F . Kokkoras , Ι. Sakellariou., ISBN: 978-960-8396-64-7, Publisher: University of Macedonia Press/Greece, 2011.

2." Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach", S. Russell & P. Norvig, ISBN: 978-0136042594, Publisher: Pearson/USA, 2010

3."Artificial Intelligence: A Guide to Intelligent Systems", Michael Negnevitsky, ISBN: 978-1408225745, Addison Wesley/USA, 2011

Journal Article Resources:

"AI Magazine", AAAI Organization, http://www.aaai.org/Magazine/magazine.php 

SYSTEMS MODELLING AND OPTIMIZATION

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Face to face
Weekly Hours:  Lectures 2
ECTS:  3
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The purpose of this course is to acquire the necessary scientific knowledge at the application level modeling methods and optimization of systems management to investigate and fix the environmental impacts encountered.

Upon completion of the course, students:

•will be familiar with the study of basic statistical issues (linear regression - correlation, analysis of variance, non-parametric hypothesis testing) with application in computer systems and

•they will have acquired the necessary knowledge and skills to understand basic principles and methods thus being able to utilize in solving mathematical problems and analyzing statistical data.

Module Description

The core modules of the course include:

•Forecasting methodology - Arma, Arima, Arimax, Box and Jenkins models - Artificial neural network models - Choice between alternative predictive models.

•Introductory concepts, models, simulation, modeling and simulation of environmental systems - Dispersion models of air pollutants from linear, surface and point sources - Lagrange approach method - Analytical and numerical methods - Transport and distribution of pollution over long distances. Examples of applications to environmental problems (air pollution, pollution of surface and groundwater, soil pollution, solid waste, noise, radiation).

Assessment Methods and Criteria

 Final Written Examination: 100%

Recommended or required Bibliography

International Bibliography: 

•Brown, L.C., Mac Berthouex, P. (2002). Statistics for Environmental Engineers, 2nd Edition, CRC Press (ISBN: 1-56670-592-4).

•Wilks, D.S. (2011). Statistical Methods in the Atmospheric Sciences, 3rd Edition, International Geophysics Series, Vol. 100, Academic Press (ISBN: 978-0-12-385022-5).

 

BROADBAND NETWORK TECHNOLOGIES

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Face to face
Weekly Hours:  Lectures 2
ECTS:  3
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the theoretical and practical part of the course, students will be in the position to:

•Evaluate the potential and operation of Broadband Network technologies, and to identify the requirements and means for supporting the deployment of broadband services.

•Know the way in which packet switching over Broadband Networks is implemented through the use of label swathing techniques

•Assess the different alternative solutions at protocol level and core/access network technologies for supporting the needs of high bitrate data communications.

•Analyze and identify the characteristics of relevant network protocols in order to evaluate/propose/select solutions on the implementation of communication infrastructures, or work in related topics.

•Work (individually or in collaboration with colleague students or engineers) on the design/selection of technologies and implementation issues for Broadband Networks.

Module Description

Scope:

The course of the Broadband Network Technologies aims to give students the necessary knowledge on broadband networks. The course presents theoretical and practical topics on computer systems communication over broadband networks, technologies for high bitrate data communications, packet based data transfer, and topics on services requiring high bandwidth and quality assurance, such as of multimedia streaming.

Content

The course aims at presenting and analyzing core broadband technologies. More specifically, in the context of the course, broadband technologies and network architectures are presented, starting from the basic principles on packet switched networks, and covering both access and core network technologies.

In particular, the course covers the following:

¥Circuit switching, packet switching, Frame Relay, optical switching. Synchronous Digital Hierarchy (SDH / SONET).

¥B-ISDN and xDSL Network architectures

¥Networks based on the Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM).

¥Packet switching techniques and architectures.

¥Overview of network technologies for supporting multimedia services.

¥Resource management, traffic shaping, prioritization.

¥Packet scheduling algorithms

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Exams take place at the end of semester and include written tests on all course topics (100%). 

Exams are in Greek and include one or more of the following:

-  Multiple choice questions.

-  Design and/or analysis of broadband networks infrastructures.

-  Solving of problems on data transmission , packet switching, and routing.

-  Comparative assessment of theoretical knowledge acquired during the course

Recommended or required Bibliography

-Recommended Literature:

1.James F. Kurose - Keith W. Ross, Computer Networking, 6th Edition, Addison-Wesley, 2013. 

2.Tanenbaum & Wetherall, Computer Networks (5th Edition), Prentice Hall, 2010. Douglas E. Comer, Computer Networks and Internets with Internet Applications, 4th edition, Prentice Hall

 

E-LEARNING SYSTEMS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Face to face
Weekly Hours:  Lectures 2
ECTS:  3
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course, students will be able to :

•Compare and contrast the major learning theories.

•Determine the benefits and drawbacks of different learning management systems and other distance learning platforms.

•Compare and contrast synchronous and asynchronous learning.

•Install and use basic administrative functions of an LMS.

•Create educational multimedia learning objects.

•Demonstrate understanding by designing and implementing an educational scenario for a distance learning course.

Module Description

The main purpose of the course is the knowledge of educational theories and familiarity with the use of new technologies in distance education as well as the development of educational resources and assignments. The following gives a list of topics, covered in the course :

•Introduction and Background on Educational Technology

•Learning Management Systems

•Learning Theories

•Instructional Design and Course Organization

•Design and Development of Multimedia Learning Content

•Course Authoring Tools

•Learning Technology Standards.

•The Modern Web Technologies in Education

•Asynchronous E-Learning: The Case of Moodle

•Synchronous E-Learning: The Case of Open Meetings

•Collaborative and Virtual Environments in Education

•Evaluation Issues

•Future Trends in Education

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Project (100%)

Students are required to develop a website for distance learning with specific requirements. In addition, they implement the necessary educational multimedia objects.

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Recommended Book and Journal Article Resources:

1.“Advanced Learning Technologies for Learning”, S. Retalis (Editor), ISBN 960033983X, Kastaniotis Publishing, 2005.

2.iJET, International Journal of Emerging Technologies in E-Learning, http://www.i-jet.org/ 

 

8th Semester

PRACTICAL TRAINING

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  
Weekly Hours:  
ECTS:  
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

 

Module Description

 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

 

Recommended or required Bibliography

 

FINAL YEAR THESIS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  
Weekly Hours:  
ECTS:  
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

 

Module Description

 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

 

Recommended or required Bibliography