Modules - Department of Electronics Engineering

1st Semester

MATHEMATICS I

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  face to face
Weekly Hours:  Lect.: 4
ECTS:  6
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course module students possess advanced knowledge, skills and competences in the subject of Mathematics that enable them to:

 

1. Solve linear systems of equations using Linear Algebra;

2. Solve linear systems of equations with complex numbers;

3. Know and be able to explain by sketching the physical meaning of derivates and integrals; 

4. Apply taught methods to calculate integrals; use derivatives and integrals to solve problems in physics / mechanics; 

5. Apply taught methodology in problem solving of other fields of science and technology, in real life contexts;

6. Use vector analysis and its basic operations (inner product, angle, external product, etc) in analyzing problems and synthesizing solutions;

7. Assess different methods for the synthesis of solutions to real-life problems and select the appropriate for the problem at hand;

8. Work in a group on analyzing and solving problems given as group assignments during the semester.

Module Description

1. Introduction to Vector Analysis. 

2. Inner product, external product, angle, vector measure. 

3. Basic laws of complex numbers.

4. Calculations in complex numbers.

5. The N-th roots of unity.

6. The N-th roots of a complex number.

7. Calculating powers of complex numbers.

8. Introduction to matrices.

9. Solution of linear systems of equations using Crammer Method.

10. Solution of linear systems of equations using Gauss Elimination Method.

11. Basic laws of derivates.

12. Introduction to integrals and basics calculating methods.

13. Integrated problems solving; applications in physics and mechanics; real-life problems addressed through derivatives and integrals.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Student evaluation is performed in the language of instruction.

 

Final written exam on all taught material (70%) 

Homework Assignments turned in during the semester (30%)

Recommended or required Bibliography

Essential reading

1. “Mathematics I”. E. Katopodis, Α. Μakrigiannis, S. Sassalos (in Greek).

2. “Μathematics I” D. Anastasatos, (in Greek).

 

Recommended Books

Linear Algebra, G. Strang.

PHYSICS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  face to face
Weekly Hours:  Lect.: 4, Lab.: 2
ECTS:  7
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The aim of the course is to provide students a solid foundation in key areas of core Physics. The issues covered in the course are presented by putting emphasis on applications. The teaching method is based on lecture courses and laboratory work aiming to help students both to understand the basis of knowledge in Physics and to master analytical and experimental skills.

 

Upon successful completion of this course module, the student is expected to be able to:

•Know and be able to explain orally the basic laws of the taught physics areas (Kinematics and Dynamics);

•Understand and explain orally the difference between electricity and magnetism; draw elementary electric and magnetic circuits; name quantities and explain their nature and units; distinguish among various types of electromagnetic field applications;

•Apply the laws of Physics taught to solve simple and complex problems belonging to the covered subjects (Kinematics and Dynamics, Electricity, Magnetism, etc.);

•Apply the principle of Conservation of Energy to solve simple and complex Kinematics and Dynamics problems;

•Understand and explain orally and by sketching the notion of oscillation, the waveforms and the periodicity;

•Compute basic parameters of an oscillating signal or system; apply the wave equation taught for the computation of values for an oscillatory signal;

•Understand the basic theories on the nature of light; name and classify light sources, optical devices and optical circuits; use laws of Physics to compute basic conditions and parameters for light emission and LED operation;

•Name and briefly describe major laws, assumptions and open issues in Atomic and Nuclear Physics.

Module Description

Fundamental elements of Classical Physics. Introduction to :

1. Kinematics

2. Dynamics

3. Conservation of energy

4. Electricity

5. Magnetism

6. Oscillations

7. Waves and wave equation

8. Optics

9. Atomic and Nuclear Physics.

 

Laboratory

1. Measurements and errors

2. Graphical representation of experimental results

3. Measurement of the acceleration of gravity using a simple pendulum

4. Evaluation of the constant of a spring

5. RLC circuits

6. Measurement of the velocity of light

7. Measurement of the internal resistance of a battery

8. Transformer

9. Study of the efficiency of a photovoltaic cell

10. Gamma ray absorption in matter

11. Study of a laser

12. Measurement of the efficiency of a lamp

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final grade = Theory part grade x 60% + Lab part grade x 40%

 

Theory Part grade: 

Final written exam (80%) 

Homework (20%)

 

Lab part grade:

Average of all grades received at each weekly Lab Experiment.

Recommended or required Bibliography

Recommended Books

1. SERWAY, R.A., Physics for Scientists and Engineers, University Physics, Berkeley, USA

2. YOUNG, H.D., University Physics, Berkeley Physics Course, USA

ELECTRONIC PHYSICS & OPTOELECTRONICS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Face to face
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 4

 Laboratory, 4

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

In the Electronic Physics & Optoelectronics course, the student acquires fundamental knowledge on electronic devices, on the physics of semiconductors and on basic optoelectronics. The student will be able to understand and to use the concepts of modeling, to understand the behavior of electronic components and perform analysis and design of bias circuits (DC analysis) for diodes and transistors. 

 

More specifically, upon the students possess advanced knowledge, skills and competences in the subject of Electronic Physics and Optoelectronics that enable them to:

•Know, understand and be able to state the basic concepts of semiconductor devices; 

•Describe the operation of a p-n junction; 

•Draw diagrams and explain the operation of a diode and a LED; 

•Know, identify and classify Bipolar Junction Transistors and Field Effect Transistors; 

•Analyze and design simple bias circuits for the above type of active components; 

•Know and be able to explain by drawing voltage-current diagrams the operation of Zener diodes; discuss their relative merits in comparison to simple diodes; analyze and design circuits that contain Zener diodes;

•Analyze and design bias circuits for BJTs; 

•Analyze and design bias circuits for FETs;

•Know, understand and be able to use small signal model in place of active components; differentiate among various types of components and select the appropriate model for use. 

 

The Laboratory Experiments have been designed to initiate first year Electronics Engineers to the principles of experimentation in the laboratory, to give them basic measurement and use of instrumentation skills and teach them in practice the fundamentals of semiconductors through appropriately designed experiments. 

Module Description

Lectures are given twice a week, for 13 weeks. Each lecture has a duration The material presented is divided in five (5) units:

 

Unit 1 Introduction, the meaning of modeling in science (4h)

 

Lecture 1: Introduction to the course objectives, structure and organization, requirements and obligations of students. Presentation of passive and active elements in electronics, methodology of describing active elements using the equivalent model concept.

Lecture 1b: Examples of equivalent models in science generally and especially in electronics. How do we pass from the physical functions and features of an electronic component to the model that describes its functionality. Use of simulation programs for electronic circuit design. Examples using the MULTISIM program (educational edition)

 

Unit 2 Semiconductor Physics (12h)

 

Lecture 2: Conductors, semiconductors, insulators and conductivity. Atomic structure of elements, the valence layer.

Lecture 2b: Energy levels for various elements. Emission - absorption of photons in the electromagnetic spectrum. Synoptic presentation of the emission spectrum of various sources.

Lecture 3: The semiconductor crystal. Transformation of the energy levels to the energy bands. Explanation of conductivity through energy zones.

Lecture 3b: Intrinsic Semiconductor, the electron - hole pair concept. Extrinsic semiconductor, the concept of doping. Calculations of density for electron - holes.

Lecture 4: Conductivity of conductors and semiconductors. The concept of mobility of the electrons - holes. Conductivity calculation.

Lecture 4b: Recapitulation of the concepts presented in the second section. Exercises on conductivity calculation and semiconductor resistance.

 

Unit 3 The junction Diode (12h)

 

Lecture 5: The p-n junction, diffusion currents, creation of the depletion region.

Lecture 5b: The p-n barrier potential, forward and reverse biased diodes.

Lecture 6a: Detailed description of the p-n junction diode. Calculation of the potential barrier, diode currents in correct and reverse polarity.

Lecture 6b: Operation of the diode in the Breakdown region- the zener diode. The p-n junction capacitance, the varactor diode. Operation principles for diodes, LEDs, photodiodes. Photovoltaic modules.

Lecture 7: The diode in a circuit. Calculation of the operating point using the graphical method. Diode Equivalent models for operation DC. Circuit examples.

Lecture 7b: Recapitulation of the concepts presented in the third section. Exercises with diode circuits.

 

Unit 4 The Bipolar Junction Transistor (12h)

 

Lecture 8a: Structure and symbols for BJTs, physical operation.

Lecture 8b: Currents flowing through the bipolar transistor, the meanings of the parameters α& β, Ebers-Moll model for large currents.

Lecture 9: Approximate operation of the bipolar transistor, examples of BJT circuits.

Lecture 9b: The common emitter characteristics for input – output, circuit examples.

Lecture 10a: The biasing of the bipolar transistor. Analysis of bias circuits in common emitter topology (DC analysis).

Lecture 10b: Repeat the concepts developed in the fourth section. Exercises on transistor biasing circuits.

 

Unit 5 The Field Effect Transistor (12h)

 

Lecture 11a: Physical operation MOSFET, the threshold voltage. Important design characteristics of a MOS-FET

Lecture 11b: Symbols for enhancement MOS-FETs, input-output characteristics, comparison with the bipolar transistor.

Lecture 12a: Symbols for depletion MOS-FETs, input-output characteristics, comparison with the bipolar transistor. Symbols for JFETs, input-output characteristics, comparison with the bipolar transistor.

Lecture 12b: The current of a MOS-FET operating in the saturation area, analysis of bias circuits and calculation of the operating point (DC)

 

Recapitulation (4h)

Recapitulation of the theoretical material, solving examination exercises of past years.

 

 

Laboratory Experiments

GROUP A: Introductory experiments

1. Recognition of the gauges and general measurements

2. The OHM’s Law

3. Principles of connecting resistors in series 

4. Principles of connecting resistors in parallel

5. The 1st Kirchoff law

6. The 2nd Kirchoff law

7. Potentiometers and resistors

8. Electric power and energy

9. Studying Wire lamps

10. Studying VDRs

11. Studying Thermistors

 

GROUP B: Experiments with the oscilloscope and diodes 

1. Oscilloscope I

2. Oscilloscope II

3. Oscilloscope III

4. P-N Diodes 

5. Zener Diodes

6. The LED Diode

7. Photodiodes

 

GROUP C: Experiments on Transistors

1. Transistors (In General)

2.  Transistors in CE topology

3.  Transistors in CB topology 

4. FET

5. MOSFET

6. TRIAC

7. DIAC

8. Phototransistor 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final course grade = 

Lectures part grade x 60% + Laboratory part grade x 40%.

 

Lectures part grade results from:

Final exam (80%) and Homework (20%) 

 

Laboratory part grade results from:

•The students attending the lab, must be familiar with the theory of the specific exercise. During the lab experiment they implement the specific circuits, they complete their measurements and try to get answers for their questions. The next time they visit the lab they must deliver a report for the particular experiment. Their presence at the lab is obligatory.

•Each exercise is evaluated with a grade that results from the evaluation of the report and his oral presence. The oral results are announced during the exercise duration.

•The final examination includes oral and practical exams.

 

The final Laboratory grade is calculated by a formula announced to the students at the start of each semester. Normally the final examination has a weighting factor of 0.7 and the oral examination with the homework has a weighting factor of 0.3. 

Recommended or required Bibliography

Essential reading

1. J. Haritantis, Electronics I- Introduction to Electronics, Arakynthos Editions ISBN: 978-960-91034-6-6 (In Greek)

2. John Kostis, Laboratory manual  (In Greek)

 

Recommended Books

1. Albert Malvino, Electronic Principles, McGraw-Hill, (in Greek), Tziolas Editions, Thessaloniki, Greece

2. Albert Malvino, Basic Electronics-Introduction to transistors and Integrated circuits, Tziolas Editions (In Greek)

3. Richard C. Jaeger, Microelectronics Α, Tziolas Editions, (In Greek)

4. Jacob Millman & Arvin Grabel, Microelectronics Vol. Α, Tziolas Editions (In Greek)

5. Millman J. and C. Halkias, Electronic Devices and Circuits, Papasotiriou Editions, (In Greek)

6. Sedra, A.S. and K. C. Smith, Microelectronic Circuits, Vol. Α, Papasotiriou Editions, (translated into Greek). 

ELECTRIC CIRCUITS I

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  face to face
Weekly Hours:  Lect.: 4
ECTS:  6
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course, the students possess advanced knowledge, skills and competences in the subject of Electric Circuits that enable them to: 

•Sketch or draw DC electric circuits,

•Analyse circuits and compute values for currents and voltages,

•Use computational methods suitable for the solution of electric circuits problems,

•Interpret and check the soundness of computation results,

•Analyse application problems that involve electric circuits and assess the realisability of the solutions, 

•Collaborate with others and work in a team for the integrated address (analysis and synthesis) of complex DC electric circuits problems, the assessment of alternative solutions and the decision making required.

 

Module Description

1. Introduction to the DC electric circuits.

2. Electric components, voltage and current sources.

3. Basic laws of the electric circuits.

4. Circuits' analysis: Mesh-current method I.

5. Circuits' analysis: Mesh-current method II.

6. Circuits' analysis: Fundamental loops method.

7. Circuits' analysis: Node-voltage method.

8. Superposition theorem and applications.

9. Thevenin and Norton theorems and applications.

10. Load matching and maximum power transfer theorem.

11. Millman theorem and applications.

12. Transient response of 1st order linear circuits, time constant.

13. Integrated problems solving.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Student evaluation is performed in the language of instruction.

 

Final written exam on all taught material (80%) 

Homework Assignments turned in during the semester (20%)

Recommended or required Bibliography

Essential reading

1. Hayt William H., Kemmerly Jack E., Durbin Steven, Engineering Circuits Analysis.

2. Alexander C., Sadiku M., Fundamentals of Electric Circuits.

 

Recommended Books

1. Drossopoulos, A., DC Electric Circuits, (in Greek)

2. Hatzarakis, G., Electric Circuits, Tziolas Publications (in Greek). 

3. Desoer C. A., Basic circuit theory, McGraw Hill. 

4. Nilson, J.W. and S. A. Riedel, Electric Circuits, Addison-Wesley. 

STRUCTURED PROGRAMMING

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  face to face
Weekly Hours:  Lect.: 2, Lab.: 2
ECTS:  4
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

 

The course objective is to introduce students in the algorithmic way of thinking and problem solving by computers. Issues addressed in class are: the notion of algorithm, data representations, algorithm design methods, algorithmic problem solving. Students learn the fundamental principles of structured programming. Typical characteristics and mechanisms of a structured programming language are introduced and students are introduced to the design and development of structured programs in this language. C programming language is used as the course basis. Lectures are completed by lab practice where theoretical knowledge is applied in an appropriate software environment. 

 

Upon successful completion of this course, the students possess advanced knowledge, skills and competences in Structured Programming that enable them to:

•Understand and explain the basic design principles for algorithms,

•Understand basic computer  programming principles, distinguish them and classify them,

•Know a substantial number of basic algorithms and use them in problem solving,

•Know the C programming language and use it to write original code for problem solving,

•Know the tools for software development in C and use them to analyse complex problems, to construct solutions (algorithms) and to code them in C,

•Collaborate within a team that develops algorithms and application in C.

Module Description

1. Introduction to programming electronic systems.

2. Introduction to “C” lang.

3. Control structures and loops.

4. Arrays.

5. Pointers.

6. Strings.

7. Functions.

8. Algorithms I

9. Structures.

10. Algorithms II.

11. Recursion

12. Algorithms III.

 

Laboratory Experiments:

 

1. Control structures and loops, programs I

2. Control structures and loops, programs II

3. Arrays, programs I

4. Arrays, programs II

5. Pointers, programs

6. Strings, programs

7. Functions, programs I

8. Functions, programs II

9. Structures, programs I

10. Structures, programs II

11. Recursion, programs I.

12. Recursion, programs II.

13. Advanced programs.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final grade = Theory part grade x 60% + Lab part grade x 40%

 

Theory Part grade: 

Final written exam (100%) 

 

Lab part grade:

Average of all grades received at each weekly Lab Experiment

Recommended or required Bibliography

Essential reading

1. The “C” programming language, B. W. Kernighan, D. M. Ritchie  

2. The Art of Computer Programming, D. E. Knuth

 

Recommended Books

1. C, from theory to practice, G. Tselikis and N. Tselikas, (in Greek)

2. C language in depth, N. Chatzigiannakis (in Greek). 

3. Learn C language,  D. Karolidis (in Greek). 

2nd Semester

MATHEMATICS II

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  face to face
Weekly Hours:  Lect.: 4
ECTS:  7
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course module students possess advanced knowledge, skills and competences in the subject of Mathematics that enable them to:

 

1. Identify, name and classify first order differential equations; solve such equations applying taught methods; 

2. Identify, name and classify higher order differential equations and systems of differential  equations; solve such equations applying taught methods; 

3. Know and be able to explain in writing the nature, role and basic laws of Laplace Transform and of frequency domain; 

4. Apply Laplace Transform to solve ordinary differential equations; 

5. Differentiate between Laplace Transform and Fourier Transform; judge which of them is applicable for the solution of a given problem;

6. Understand and be able to explain (by plotting functions and waveforms) the notion of periodicity and its expression in time and in frequency; 

7. Use Fourier Series to compute power spectra of periodic signals (waveforms); 

8. Apply taught methods in solving (analysis and synthesis of a solution) composite problems coming from various fields of science and technology;

9. Comparatively evaluate alternative methods for solving composite problems;

10. Work in a group to solve problems in group assignments.

Module Description

Lectures:

1. Introduction to differential equations.

2. Homogeneous differential equations of the first order.

3. The use of the integral Euler factor m.

4. Linear differential equations of the first order.

5. Various kinds of differential equations: Bernoulli, Ricatti, Clairaut, Euler, etc

6. Wronsky’s methods.

7. Introduction to the Laplace Transform.

8. Solution of differential equations using Laplace Transform.

9. The inverse Laplace Transform and it’s use.

10. Fourier Transform – Fourier Series.

11. Fourier Series computation for periodic signals (waveforms).

12. Composite problems solving – applications from various fields of science and technology

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Student evaluation is performed in the language of instruction.

 

Final written exam on all taught material (70%) 

Homework Assignments turned in during the semester (30%)

Recommended or required Bibliography

Essential reading

1. Differential Equations, Ι. Geogoudis, Α. Paliatsos, Ν. Prezerakos, (in Greek).

2. Applied Mathematics, III, A. Alexandrpoulos, (in Greek).

3. Laplace and Fourier transformations, Gagalis, (in Greek)

4. Differential Equations, D. Anastasatos, (in Greek)

ELECTRIC CIRCUITS II

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  face to face
Weekly Hours:  Lect.:2 ,Lab.: 2
ECTS:  4
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course module students possess advanced knowledge, skills and competences in the subject of Electric Circuits that enable them to:

 

•Sketch or draw AC electric circuits,

•Analyse these circuits and compute values for currents and voltages,

•Use computational methods suitable for the solution of electric circuits problems,

•Interpret and check the soundness of computation results,

•Analyse application problems that involve electric circuits and assess the realisability of the solutions, 

•Collaborate with others and work in a team for the integrated address (analysis and synthesis) of complex AC electric circuits problems, the assessment of alternative solutions and the decision making required.

Module Description

Lectures: 

1. AC Voltage and current. Average and Effective value.

2. Introduction to the AC electric circuits.

3. Impedance, simple circuits.

4. Complex numbers, phasors.

5. Circuits' analysis: Mesh-current method I.

6. Circuits' analysis: Node-voltage method.

7. Power: Active, reactive, complex and apparent 

8. Power factor 

9. Superposition theorem and applications.

10. Thevenin and Norton theorems and applications.

11. Load matching and maximum power transfer theorem

12. Magnetic and coupled circuits, Transformers.

13. Multiphase systems, Introduction to electrical machines

 

Laboratory Experiments:

1. Introduction, safety regulations

2. AC Measurements

3. Use of Oscilloscope.

4. Impedance measurements.

5. Resistor and capacitor series circuit.

6. Impedance and resistor in parallel.

7. Series resonator.

8. Parallel resonator

9. Time constant

10. Transformers

11. Coupled circuits

12. Use of Pspice I

13. Use of Pspice II

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final course grade = 

Lectures part grade x 60% + Laboratory part grade x 40%,

 

Lectures part grade results from:

Final written exam on all taught material (100%). The exam includes:

1.Analysis of a simple circuit,

2.Current and voltage dividers,

3.Power and power factor computation, 

4.Thevenin και Norton Equivalent circuits. 

 

Laboratory part grade results from:

Written test on each of the lab experiments.

Average is used as final lab grade.

Recommended or required Bibliography

Essential reading

1. Engineering Circuits Analysis, Hayt William H., Kemmerly Jack E., Durbin Steven,  

2. Fundamentals of Electric Circuits, Alexander C., Sadiku M.

Recommended Books

1. AC Electric Circuits, A. Drossopoulos, (in Greek)

2. Electric Circuits, Hatzarakis, G., Tziolas Publications (in Greek). 

3. Basic circuit theory,  Desoer C. A., McGraw Hill. 

4. Electric Circuits, Nilson, J.W. and S. A. Riedel, Addison-Wesley. 

ANALOG ELECTRONICS I

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Face to face  
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 4

Laboratory, 2 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course module students possess advanced knowledge, skills and competences in the subject of Analog Electronics that enable them to:

 

•Analyse simple electronic circuits based on diodes and transistors with special focus on designing amplifiers with discrete components;

•Design simple linear power supplies according to the required specifications; Design and analyse bias circuits for BJTs and Amplifiers for the basic categories (CE, CC, CB and those for FETs);

•Perform Analysis at AC of Amplifiers based on BJTs and FETs using weak signal models;

•Demonstrate basic skills on using electronic devices simulation programs and on applying them in homework and laboratory exercises. 

•Cooperate with fellow students as a team for the successful implementation of the laboratory exercises with the appropriate preparation of the procedures that must be followed, as well as the study of the relevant material for homework 

Module Description

Lectures

 

Unit 1 Introduction to Analog Electronics 

1.1 Signals 

1.2 The Frequency Spectrum 

1.3 Analog and Digital Signals 

1.4 Introduction to Amplifiers 

1.5 Circuit Models for Amplifiers 

 

Unit 2 Diodes

2.1 The ideal diode 

2.2 I-V characteristic of a diode 

2.3 Analysis of diode circuits 

2.4 The small-signal diode model and its applications 

2.5 Zener diodes 

2.6 Rectifier circuits and Power Supplies 

2.7 Limiters and clippers 

2.8 Simulation of diodes with SPICE models 

 

Unit 3 BJTs (Bipolar junction transistors) 

3.1 Basic principles and operation in the active area

3.2 Operation of BJTs in the DC

3.3 Biasing topologies 

3.4 Building an amplifier with BJTs 

3.5 BJT small signal model 

3.6 Graphical analysis for the BJT operation as an Amplifier

3.7 Basic amplifier topologies with BJTs 

3.8 Analysis and design examples of single and multiple stages amplifiers based on BJTs

3.9 Simulation examples of single and multiple stages amplifiers based on BJTs

using SPICE models 

 

Unit 4 FETs (Field-effect transistors) 

4.1 Basic principles and operation in the saturation area

4.2 Operation of FETs in the DC

4.3 Biasing topologies 

4.4 Building an amplifier with FETs 

4.5 FETs small signal model 

4.6 Graphical analysis for the FETs operation as an Amplifier

4.7 Basic amplifier topologies with FETs 

4.8 Analysis and design examples of single and multiple stages amplifiers based on FETs

4.9 Simulation examples of single and multiple stages amplifiers based on FETs using SPICE models 

 

Laboratory Experiments

1. Diodes and LEDs

2. Study the common emitter (CE) Amplifier as a two-door network

3. Study the characteristics of the Common Emitter Amplifier (CE)

4. Study characteristics of Common Collector Amplifier (CC)

5. Study the characteristics of the Common Base (CB) Amplifier

6. BJT biasing methods and voltage stabilization

7. DC Amplifier 

8. Phase Inverter 

9. FET Common Source Amplifier (CS) 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final course grade = 

Lectures part grade x 60% + Laboratory part grade x 40%,

 

Lectures part grade results from:

Final exam (80%) and Homework (20%) 

 

Laboratory part grade results from:

- The students attending the lab, must be familiar with the theory of the specific exercise. During the lab experiment they implement the specific circuits, they complete their measurements and try to get answers for their questions. The next time they visit the lab they must deliver a report for the particular experiment. Their presence at the lab is obligatory.

- Each exercise is evaluated with a grade that results from the evaluation of the report and his oral presence. The oral results are announced during the exercise duration.

- The final examination includes oral and practical exams.

The final Laboratory grade is calculated by a formula announced to the students at the start of each semester. Normally the final examination has a weighting factor of 0.7 and the oral examination with the homework has a weighting factor of 0.3. 

Recommended or required Bibliography

Essential reading

1.SEDRA, A.S. and K. C. SMITH, Microelectronic Circuits, Papasotiriou Editions (translated in greek).

2. J. HARITANTIS, Electronics I- Introduction to Electronics, Arakynthos Editions ISBN: 978-960-91034-6-6 (In Greek)

3. Analog Electronics I Laboratory manual  (In Greek)

Recommended Books 

1.MILLMAN J. and C. HALKIAS, Electronic Devices and Circuits

2.MALVINO, A.P., Electronic Principles, McGraw-Hill (translated in greek).

3.Introduction to Electronics G. Tobras (In Greek) 

OBJECT-ORIENTED PROGRAMMING

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  face to face
Weekly Hours:  Lect.:2 ,Lab.:2
ECTS:  4
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The course of Object-oriented programming aims to give students the necessary knowledge on the programming of computer and Internet systems using object oriented programming language. The course aims to cover theoretical and practical issues related to the techniques of Object Oriented, Event Driven and Visual Programming Planning and uses as a programming language the Java language. 

 

Upon successful completion of this course module students possess advanced knowledge, skills and competences in the subject Object-oriented Programming that enable them to:

•Understand and describe the notions of Object-oriented and Event-oriented programming,

•Know and use visual programming tools and writes original code in an object-oriented programming environment,

•Use Java programming language at a basic level and construct software applications through Java coding,

•Analyse and understand the functionality of program code written in an object-oriented language such as Java or C++,

•Work independently or collaborate within a team to develop software applications and services using Java code.

Module Description

Lectures

1.Session 1: Introduction to OOP and Java programming language

2.Session 2: Our first program

3.Session 3: Java Commands

4.Session 4: Classes and objects in Java

5.Session 5: Data structures in Java

6.Session 6: Graphical interfaces and user interfaces

7.Session 7: Creating applets in IDE environments IDE

 

Laboratory Experiments:

1.Lab Session 1: Introduction to OOP through Alice platform

2.Lab Session 2: Introduction to Java through Greenfoot platform

3.Lab Session 3: Programming in Java with DrJava

 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final grade = Theory part grade x 60% + Lab part grade x 40%

 

For the theory part of the course:

 

Assessment is based on written tests taken at the end of the lectures, over the total of knowledge presented. Tests are in Greek, exams are given allowing access to notes and literature during the tests, and they include:

-Multiple choice questions.

-Code programming.

-Code checking and debugging

-Comparative study of elements and information presented in the context of theoretical knowledge provided.

 

For the lab part of the course: 

Assessment takes place both during and at the end of the laboratory exercises. Assessment is in Greek, allowing access to notes and literature during the tests and includes:

 

Ι. Intermediate assessment (50%) through two tests (in lab and using computers) during the semester, in units that cover: Greenfoot, DrJava

 

ΙΙ. Overall assessment (50%) through one of the following alternatives:

1. Final test (in lab and using computers) on the total of topics covered by the three above units

2. Implementation and presentation of an individual or group project with scaling difficulty.

Recommended or required Bibliography

Recommended Books

Harvey Deitel, Paul Deitel, «Java Programming», 8th Edition, Giourdas Publications,  2010 (in greek).

Wanda Dann, Stephen Cooper, and Randy Pausch, "Learning to program with Alice" 3rd edition, Pearson Education, 2012.

Michael Kölling, "Introduction to Programming with Greenfoot.

Object-Oriented Programming in Java with Games and Simulations", Pearson Education, August 2009.

ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS TECHNOLOGY & PCB DESIGN

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Face to face  
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 2

Laboratory, 2 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course module students possess advanced knowledge, skills and competences in the subject of Electronic Components and PCB Design that enable them to:

 

•Recognize and identify electronic components

•Identify codes of components

•Components function test

•Design using computer software, analog, digital and hybrid circuits

•Design a printed circuit board

•Implement a printed circuit board 

Module Description

Lectures:

1.Materials I

Solid, liquid, gas

2.Materials II

Conductors, insulators, semiconductors and semiconductor characteristics

3.Resistors

Characteristics of resistors, resistor codes, resistors categories and variable resistors

4.Dielectrics-Capacitors

Polarization types and electrical properties of the dielectric capacitors, categories of capacitors and characteristics

5.Capacitors

Dielectric capacitors, electrolytic, IC capacitors, SMD and variable capacitors

6.Coils 

Losses cored coils, induction factor with inductors, coils with core or gap, coils categories, elements of L.H and H.F, special coils

7.Ferrites 

Features of ferrites, ferrites categories regulation of inductance cores and codes, calculate inductance with ferrite core

8.Transformers 

Uses of transformers and transformer operating principles, transformer types and autotransformers

9.Sensors I 

Categories of sensors, traducers and actuators, sensors usage information, use of mechanical stress and pressure sensors

10.Sensors II

Accelerometer, magnetoresistance, categories, items, usage of temperature sensors

11.Integrated Circuits

Categories of Integrated Circuits (ICs), SSI, MSI, LSI and VLSI, photolithographic method

12.Printed Circuits Boards (PCB) I

Printed circuit boards, single- and double-sided 

13.Printed Circuits (PCB) II

Flexible PCB and multilayer PCB

 

Laboratory:

Design and construction of a PCB during the semester. 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final grade = Theory part grade x 60% + Lab part grade x 40%

 

Theory part grade: 

Individual Project (30%):

Written examination (70%)

Final written examination that includes:

•Multiple choice questions

•General comprehension questions regarding the electronic components and PCB design 

 

Laboratory part grade:

•Implementation of a project (40%)

•Carry out a series of exercises regarding PCB design (60%) 

Recommended or required Bibliography

Recommended Books

1.Karagiannis A., Electronic Component Technology, A. Tziola & Sons, Athens 2001

2.Gikas Α., Electronic Components and Materials Handbook, Papasotiriou, Athens 2010

3.Data Books (Philips, National, RS Components, Analog Device, Fairchild Semiconductors, Harris, etc.

4.Lecture notes by the instructor

5.Laboratory notes by the instructor

 

MEASUREMENTS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  face to face
Weekly Hours:  Lect.: 2, Lab.:2
ECTS:  4
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course module students possess advanced knowledge, skills and competences in the subject of Measurements that enable them to:

 

•assess the impact of systematic errors arising from equipment and component tolerances in a circuit or device,

•evaluate random errors and the methods needed to estimate them,

•handle basic electronic instruments and use them for measuring  basic electrical quantities and circuits,

•design a simple measuring circuit,

•program in an environment suitable for measurement processing,

•evaluate a basic measuring device and identify possible causes of errors and tolerances.

Module Description

Theory

1.Physical quantities, units, unit systems, standards, metrology and quality control. 

2.Error theory in physical measurements, systematic and random errors.

3.Basic electrical instruments. Rectifier-type and true-RMS instruments. 

4.AC and DC bridge measurements.

5.Introduction to electronic measurement systems and data acquisition. 

6.Electronic instruments (oscilloscopes, generators, etc). 

 

Laboratory

1.Use of basic instruments

2.Instruments calibration

3.DC-AC multimeters

4.Power measurement

5.Bridge circuits

6.Development of virtual instruments through graphical programming

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final course grade = 

Lectures part grade x 60% + Laboratory part grade x 40%,

 

Lectures part grade results from:

Final written exam on all taught material. The exam includes:

•Multiple choice questions,

•Development questions,

•Problem solving involving circuits and measurement devices.

 

Laboratory part grade results from:

•Written test on two groups of lab experiments.

•Reports on lab experiments

•Oral grade from lab participation

Recommended or required Bibliography

Essential reading

Lecture notes by the instructor.

 

Recommended Books

•NORTHROP, R. B. Introduction to Instrumentation and Measurements, CRC Press.

•DOEBELIN, E.O., Measurement Systems, McGraw-Hill.

•TAYLOR, J.R., An Introduction to Error Analysis – The Study of Uncertainties in Physical Measurements, 1997. 

•KLAASSEN, K. B., Electronic Measurement and Instrumentation, Cambridge University Press.

•KULARATNA, N., Modern Electronic Test and Measuring Instruments, IEE series.

•BENTLEY, J.P., Measurement Systems, Longman.

3rd Semester

APPLIED MATHEMATICS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  face to face
Weekly Hours:  Lect.: 4
ECTS:  6
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course module, students are expected to be able to:

1. Know and be able to apply the Laplace operator and Hamilton operator to compute gradient, deviation, rotation, etc. for various types of functions;

2. Solve basic problems in Vector Analysis;

3. Perform analysis of functions of many variables, compute limits, continuity, derivative, etc.;

4. Decide whether a given function is harmonic or not;

5. Apply taught methods to compute extreme points (maxima and minima) of functions of two or more variables;

6. Calculate the line integrals of the first and of the second type;

7. Calculate double integrals with change of variables;

8. Apply the taught methods to solve simple and complex problems;

9. Select the appropriate method for the solution of a given problem; do this for problems coming from various fields of science and technology;

10. Work in groups to analyze and solve complex problems.

Module Description

Lectures:

1. Introduction to the Lagrange operators.

2. Vector Analysis for functions of many variables.

3. Harmonic functions.

4. Laplace and Hamilton operators.

5. Gradient, deviation, rotation etc. for various types of fields.

6. Functions of many variables: limits, continuity, partial derivatives, Taylor expansion, etc.

7. Extreme points for functions of many variables.

8. Line integrals of the first and of the second type.

9. Double integrals.

10. Double integrals with change of variable.

11. Green’s Theorem.

12. Introduction to the Z Transform; inverse Z Transform of rational functions.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Student evaluation is performed in the language of instruction.

 

Final written exam on all taught material (70%) 

Homework Assignments turned in during the semester (30%)

Recommended or required Bibliography

Essential reading

1. Functions of Multiple variables, Georgoudis, Makrigiannis, Sassalos, (in Greek).

2. Basic Subjects in Arithmetical Analysis, Alexandropoulos, Paliatsos, Sofianos, (in Greek).

3.  Functions of Multiple Variables, Anastasatos, (in Greek). 

ELECTROMAGNETISM AND E/M WAVE PROPAGETION

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  face to face
Weekly Hours:  Lect.: 2
ECTS:  4
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course module students possess advanced knowledge, skills and competences in the subject of Electromagnetism and Wave Propagation that enable them to:

 

1. List the different types of EM field sources and explain what kind of Electric, Magnetic or Electromagnetic fields originate from each type of source. 

2. Explain the qualitative conclusions arising from the Maxwell equations

3. Compute Electric, Magnetic or Magnetic fields using both the Integral and the Differential form of the Maxwell Equations. 

4. Describe the wave equation in media with and without sources / losses.

5. Explain how a plane wave satisfies the wave equation in media with and without field sources / losses. 

6. List the basic wave propagation mechanisms such as free space propagation, reflection, transmission, diffraction, scattering. 

7. Explain the key characteristics of the above mentioned propagation mechanisms with respect to the field amplitude, the field phase and the direction of wave propagation.

8. Compute the field amplitude, the field phase and the direction of wave propagation taking into account the above mentioned propagation mechanisms.

9. Discuss the potential presence of the different propagation mechanisms in different types of radio links.

Module Description

Theory

1.Field Sources (electrical charges, magnetic dipoles, DC and AC currents) and Electric, Magnetic and Electromagnetic fields.

2.Integral Maxwell Equations: Gauss Law Electric and Magnetic Fields.

3.Integral Maxwell Equations: Faraday and Ampere - Maxwell Laws.

4.Computing Electric, Magnetic and Electromagnetic fields using the Integral Maxwell equations’ formalism.

5.Differential Maxwell equations and Boundary Conditions.

6.Computing Electric, Magnetic and Electromagnetic using the differential Maxwell equations’ formalism.

7.Wave Equation in lossless / lossy media with or without sources. The plain wave as a solution of the wave equation. 

8.Overview Presentation of the basic EM wave propagation mechanisms

9.Free Space Propagation 

10.Reflection and Transmission from a plane interface

11.Diffraction and Fresnel zones.

12.Scattering from small obstacles and rough surfaces

13.Radio link types and Propagation Mechanisms

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Student evaluation is performed in the language of instruction.

 

Final written exam on all taught material (80%) 

Homework Assignments turned in during the semester (20%)

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.S. P. Savaidis, Α. Skountzos, Electromagnetism and Electromagnetic Wave transmission, Synchroni Ekdotiki Eds., Athens, Greece, 2010 (in greek).

2.S. Paktitis, Α. Nasiopoulis, Introduction to Electromagnetic Wave Propagation, ION Eds., Athens, Greece, 2008 (in greek).

3.I. RFoumeliotis, I. Tsalamegkas, Electromagnetic Fields (Parts Α & Β), Tziolas Eds., Thessaloniki, Greece, 2010 (in greek).

ANALOG ELECTRONICS II

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Face to face 
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 4

Laboratory, 2 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course module students possess advanced knowledge, skills and competences in the subject of Analog Electronics that enable them to:

 

1.Analyse amplifier circuits with discrete and with integrated components, for low and for high frequencies,

2.Design analog electronic circuits including active first order filters with emphasis on OpAmp circuits,

3.Understand and explain by drawing diagrams the effect of negative feedback on an amplifier and analyse single feedback loop circuits,

4.Analyse and design simple power amplifiers for audio signals, understand and explain the notions of distortion and noise and apply noise and distortion reduction methods,

5.Work in a team to achieve these goals. 

Module Description

Lectures:

1.Introduction – Quick resumption of basic knowledge on Linear Circuits Theory

2.Amplification-Amplifiers

3.Transfer Function

4.Linear amplifiers’ models – Generalized circuit Two-Port

5.Operational Amplifiers (OpAmps)

6.Basic OpAmp circuits – Applications

7.Negative Feedback

8.Single Loop Feedback Circuits’ Analysis Methods

9.Spectral Response of Amplifiers

10.High Frequency Models of Amplifier Devices

11.High Frequency Analysis of Amplifier Circuits

12.Power Amplifiers

13.Power Amplifier Analysis / Linearity, Distortion, Noise

 

Laboratory Experiments:

Analog Electronics ΙΙ Lab offers a study of Analog Electronics operating from DC up to 10MHz through 3 Lab-preparatory Lectures / Lab-familiarization sessions and a set of 10 appropriately designed Lab Projects:

 

Lab Project 1 : "Power Supplies 1: Rectification & Filtering "

Lab Project 2 : " Power Supplies 2: Linear Regulation"

Lab Project 3: "Operational Amplifiers 1: Basic Amplifier Topologies using OpAmps "

Lab Project 4: "Operational Amplifiers 2: OpAmp Differential Amplifier and OpAmp Applications"

Lab Project 5: "Acquisition / Study of Transfer Functions "

Lab Project 6: "Negative Feedback 1: Examples with 1 BJT"

Lab Project 7: "Negative Feedback 2: Examples with OpAmps and Two-Stage BJT Amplifier"

Lab Project 8: "Power Amplifiers "

Lab Project 9: "Design of Basic BJT Circuits"

Lab Project 10: "Design of Basic JFET Circuits  

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final grade = Theory part grade x 60% + Lab part grade x 40%

 

Theory Part grade: 

Final exam (60%) 

Midterm exam (30%)

Participation (10%)

 

Lab part grade:

Average of all grades received at each weekly Lab Experiment 

Recommended or required Bibliography

Essential reading

1.SEDRA, A.S. and K. C. SMITH, Microelectronic Circuits, 6th Edition, Oxford University Press, 2009, ISBN-13 978-0195323030..

2.PAUL R. GRAY, PAUL J. HURST, 

3.S. H. LEWIS, ROBERT G. MEYER, Analysis and Design of Analog Integrated Circuits, 5th Edition, ISBN-13: 978-0470245996

4.MALVINO A.P., BATES D., Electronic Principles, McGraw-Hill Science/Engineering/Math, 7th Edition, 2006, ISBN-13: 978-0073222776.

5.Lecture Notes. 

6.Laboratory Handbook (in Greek)

Recommended Books

1.HOROWITZ P., HILL W., The Art of Electronics, Cambridge University Press, 2006

2.FRANCO S., Design with Operational Amplifiers and Analog Integrated Circuits, 4th Edition, McGraw-Hill Science/Engineering/Math, 2014, ISBN-13: 978-0078028168

3.FLEEMAN S., Electronic Devices: Discrete and Integrated, Prentice Hall, 1990, ISBN-13: 978-0133381207 

PROJECT MANAGEMENT-CAD AND CONSTRUCTION

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  face to face
Weekly Hours:  Lect.: 2, Lab.: 2
ECTS:  4
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

 The main objective of this course is to define and to explain the processes and the methodologies which are developed during the management of a project, taking in account all the steps such as , what, why, and how of executing project steps. These steps are tightly linked together, complete with an implemented project.

 

Upon successful completion of this course module students possess advanced knowledge, skills and competences in the subject of Project Management and CAD that enable them to:

 

•Schedule an engineering project,

•Make use of the tools necessary for the project feasibility studies,

•Work as team members,

•Use methodologies and tools according to project requirements,

•Undertake project implementation,

•Implement the project control,

•Complete the project on time and meet all specifications,

•Finally, perform the evaluation of the project. 

Module Description

Lectures

1. Introduction to Project Management

Project manager, motivation, communication and cooperation rules and project agenda

2. Define Project

Set project feasibility report, project initiation and project specifications

3. WBS, Develop Project Team 

Work Breakdown Structure (WBS), skills identification and establishment of project team

4. Initiate Project

The agenda of the inaugural meeting, presentation of specifications and presentation of project planning 

5.List of Tasks

Preparation for tasks list, affinity diagram, finalize project tasks list  

6. GANTT Diagram

Basics of GANTT diagram, use of MSProject 

7. Critical Path

Introduction to project time planning, linear charts, netting charts, total duration of the project and project critical path

8. Project Quality

Project quality planning, tools and techniques, quality assurance, tools and techniques and quality control

9. Management of human resources

Organizational planning, staff acquisition and team development

10. Management of project communication

Communications planning, information distribution, performance report and administrative closure

11. Risk analysis

Programming risk management, risk identification, qualitative and quantitative risk analysis, risk response planning, monitoring and risk control

12. Management of project changes

The change structure procedures and change control

13. Closing the project

Project closing characteristics, closing contract, administrative closure and administrative project closure results and project evaluation

 

Laboratory Experiments:

Project Implementation (from beginning to end) on a weekly basis – Report on the results

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final grade = Theory part grade x 60% + Lab part grade x 40%

 

Theory part grade: 

Individual Project (30%):

The individual project contains the following:

•Solve series of exercises regarding project management and circuit design

 

Written examination (70%):

Final written examination that includes:

•Multiple choice questions

•General comprehension questions regarding the theory of  project management

 

Laboratory part grade:

•Implementation of a project (80%)

•Midterm feasibility study (20%)

Recommended or required Bibliography

Recommended Books

1.Kokkosis A.I. (2010), CAD Tools and Electronic Design, 2nd edition, Modern Publications, Athens

2.Kokkosis A.I. (2011), Project management, 2nd edition, Modern Publications, Athens

3.Kokkosis A.I. (2013). Project management and CAD design, Modern Publications, Athens

4.Verzuch E., (2006), Introduction to Project Management, Klidarithmos Publications 

5.Maylor, H., (2009), Project Management, 3rd edition, Klidarithmos Publications 

6.Kerzner, (2013) Project Management A Systems Approach, John Wiley 

7.Heldman, K., (2012), Project Management Professional Study Guide, SYBEX

8.Dawson, C., (2005), Projects in Computing and Information Systems: A Students Guide, Addison Wesley

ARCHITECTURE AND ORGANISATION OF MICROCOMPUTERS I

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  face to face
Weekly Hours:  Lect.:2 ,Lab.:2
ECTS:  4
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course module students possess advanced knowledge, skills and competences in the subject of Architecture and Organization of Microcomputers that enable them to:

•Describe by block diagrams the inner architecture and organization of 8-bit microprocessors, 

•Select the appropriate implementation of a microcomputer system for the needs of the specific application addressed,

•Use appropriate tools to program a microprocessor in machine language or in symbolic language,

•Interpret and check the validity of the results of the programs developed, both at the system and at the user level, 

•Analyse microcomputer system applications problems and construct solutions (design microcomputer systems) under technical and budget constraints,

•Collaborate in a team for the integral addressing (analysis – synthesis) of complex microcomputer systems design and development methods at the hardware and at the software level, for the assessment of alternative solutions and for decision making towards implementation.

Module Description

Lectures 

1. Introduction

2. Internal organization and units of a simple microprocessor system

3. Central Processing Unit

4. Memory interfacing

5. Programming, Operating Systems

6.  Programming, Hex code, Assembly language

7. Instruction set I

8. Instruction set II

9. Interrupts

10. I/O modules

11. Parallel port

12. Design of a simple microprocessor system I

13. Design of a simple microprocessor system II

 

Laboratory Experiments:

1. Introduction, safety regulations

2. Loading and execution of a program using an emulator

3. 8 and 16 bits loading instructions

4. Exchange and transfer instructions

5. Jump instructions, delay routines

6. Call and return instructions

7. Arithmetic and Logic instructions

8. ASCI data manipulation

9. Arithmetic operations of binary and hex numbers

10. Operations of multiple bytes numbers

11. BCD arithmetic

12. Interrupt mechanisms

13. Final overview

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final grade = Theory part grade x 60% + Lab part grade x 40%

 

Theory Part grade: 

Final exam (60%) 

Midterm exam (30%)

Participation (10%)

 

Lab part grade:

Average of all grades received at each weekly Lab Experiment

Recommended or required Bibliography

Essential reading

1. Z-80 Microprocessor: Architecture, Interfacing, Programming, and Design, Gaonkar, Prentice Hall.

2. The 8051 Microcontroller: A Systems Approach, Mazidi, McKinlay and Mazidi, Prentice Hall.

3. Microcomputers and Microprocessors: The 8080, 8085, and Z-80 Programming, Interfacing, and Troubleshooting, Uffenbeck, Prentice Hall.

 

Recommended Books

1. Digital and Microprocessor Fundamentals: Theory and Application, Kleitz, Prentice Hall. 

2. UFFENBECK, J., Microcomputer and Microprocessors, Prentice Hall (Pearson Education). 

3. HALL, D., Microprocessors and Digital Systems, McGraw-Hill. 

4. PASAHOW, E., Microprocessor Technology and Microcomputers,  Mc Graw-Hill

LOGIC CIRCUITS DESIGN

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Face to face  
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 4

Laboratory, 2 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

It is an introductory course to logic circuits and digital systems aiming to:

•familiarization with binary logic, synthesis and analysis of combinational circuits

•introduction to the concept and methods of digital computer arithmetic

•introduction to the fundamental principles of sequential circuits

•acquaintance to novel design techniques and implementation technologies of digital systems

 

Upon successful completion of this course module students possess advanced knowledge, skills and competences in the subject of Logic Circuit Design that enable them to:

•understand the functionality and applications of logic circuits;

•design and simulate logic circuits using software CAD tools;

•recognize and define the hardware required for synthesis and implementation of simple combinational and sequential circuits in terms of standard integrated circuits;

•analyze, design and synthesize logic circuits for low complexity applications. 

Module Description

Lectures

•Binary numbers

•Numerical systems and codes 

•Boolean algebra

•Logic functions and logic gates

•Function simplification

•Combinational logic modules and circuits

•Information storage, flip-flops, registers

•Introduction to digital circuit design tools

•Implementation methodologies 

 

Laboratory

Ten laboratory exercises covering all module topics either by using commercial CAD tools for design and simulation of logic circuits or by implementing simple logic functions on breadboard. 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final course grade = Lectures part grade x 60% + Laboratory part grade x 40%

 

The final written exam of the theoretical part of the module includes exercises and design problems of graded difficulty. The module content as well as test examples (solved and unsolved) are available to the students through the course web page. Students are allowed to bring any related book during examination.  

 

The evaluation of the laboratory part is performed through:

•Oral or written test during lab exercise implementation (20%), 

•Mid term exam (20%)

Final exam (60%) 

Recommended or required Bibliography

Essential reading

1.MORRIS MANO, M., CILETTI, M., Digital Design, 4/e, Prentice Hall. 

2.BROWN, ST.,VRANESIC, Z., Fundamentals of Digital Logic with VHDL Design, 3/e, McGraw-Hill Higher Education

3.KYRIAKIS-BITZAROS, E. D., Logic Circuit Design, Laboratory Manual

Recommended Books

1.MORRIS MANO, M., and KIME, C.R., Logic and Computer Design Fundamentals, Pearson Education, 4/e, 2008.

2.GAJSKI D.D., Principles of Digital Design, Prentice Hall; 1/e, 1996. 

4th Semester

RF ELECTRONIC CIRCUITS DESIGN

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  face to face
Weekly Hours:  Lect.: 2, Lab.: 2
ECTS:  4
Web Page:  
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The objective of this course module is to provide students with: 

•Knowledge of feedback techniques and design of positive and negative feedback electronic circuits

•Design of RF oscillators using RC, LC and quartz components, as well as multivibrators and oscillator circuits using the 55 i.c.

•Knowledge of transceiver components and their functionality, and design of amplifiers, mixers and modulators at system level

•Analysis and design of passive and active filters.

 

Upon successful completion of this course module students possess advanced knowledge, skills and competences in the subject of RF Design that enable them to:

 

•Locate, identify and tell apart positive and negative feedback designs in electronic circuits, list main positive and negative feedback effects;

•Draw block diagrams of electronic circuits with feedback loops for the basic classes of oscillators and signal generators;

•Identify, name and classify the major oscillator types and designs (RC, LC, quartz (XTAL)). Draw their block diagrams and produce basic design circuits. Assess the relative advantages of each type for given specifications and select the appropriate design among alternatives;

•Understand the notion of non-linearity and state its major consequences in circuit analysis and design methodology,

•Draw block diagram and describe in detail the operation of multivibrator circuits based on the 555 IC, in bistable, astable and monostable operating modes;

•Reproduce the full block diagram of RF transmitters and receivers (AM and FM modulation), name their components and explain the functionality of each (Local Oscillator, Mixer, RF amplifier, IF amplifier, envelope detector, smoothing filter, AF amplifier, AGC);

•Connect a prototype transceiver in the lab, for a given design, check connectivity and carry out measurements to verify operation characteristics;

•Perform detailed analysis and design of major passive and active filter classes;

•Assess relative merits of alternative designs for specific applications and select appropriate solutions. 

Module Description

 

Positive and negative feedback; Barkhausen and oscillation criteria; Nyquist diagrams. RC, LC and quartz oscillators. Multi-vibrators; Oscillators with the 555 IC. Stagger amplifiers; Transceivers and components; modulators; low-noise amplifiers; passive and active filters. 

 

Lectures:

Unit 1: Feedback and oscillation (3 lectures)

Unit 2: RC, LC and XTAL oscillators, VCOs, Multi-vibrators, 555-based circuits, (4 lectures), 

Unit 3: Transceiver circuits: Mixers, Amplifiers and resonant amplifiers, Modulators and Convertors (4 lectures),

Unit 4: Passive and active filters of 1st and 2nd order (2 lectures).

 

Laboratory Experiments:

1.Harmonic Oscillators – Low and medium frequencies (Phase-shift, Wien bridge, Quadrature)

2.Harmonic Oscillators – High frequencies (LC – Hartley and Colpitts, XTAL)

3.Multi-vibrators based on 555 IC

4.Non-linear circuits (clippers)

5.Transceiver components (IF amplifiers, Local Oscillators, Mixers, RF amplifiers, Envelope detectors, Automatic gain (volume) control)

6.AM radio receiver (superheterodyne)

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final grade is the weighted average of 

(i)Lecture part grade x 60%

(ii)Laboratory part grade x 40%

 

Lecture part grade:

•Final written (80%)

•Homework (20%)

 

Final written exam is composed of 

•questions on the taught material, that require both to recall knowledge and to use critical thinking in order to select among alternatives, 

•problem solving that requires full circuit analysis and synthesis capabilities, for all taught circuit classes.

 

Laboratory part grade:

Average of the grades received in each weekly Laboratory Experiment. 

 

Laboratory Experiments are performed on a weekly basis; participation is mandatory. Each experiment is assessed through 

(a)a written report turned in the following week x 40%

(b)an oral examination on the experiment of previous week x 60%.

Recommended or required Bibliography

Essential reading

1. MILLMAN, J. and HALKIAS, C., Integrated Electronic Circuits, ΤΕΕ Publications.

2. SEDRA, Α. and SMITH, Κ.C., Microelectronic Circuits, Oxford University Press, 2009.

3. MALVINO, A. and BATES, D., Electronic Principles, McGraw-Hill Education, 2015.

SIGNALS, SYSTEMS AND CIRCUITS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Face to face  
Weekly Hours: Lectures, 4 
ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course module students possess advanced knowledge, skills and competences in the subject of Signals, Systems and Circuits that enable them to:

 

1.Understand and describe causal/non-causal, linear/non-linear, time variant/invariant, discrete/continuous time and other system categories. 

2.Perform Fourier analysis of continuous time signals and systems with applications in electronic circuits.

3.Perform time and frequency domain analysis of analog systems, especially electronic circuits

4.Interpret the results of analysis of continuous time systems and circuits, so as to conclude on their characterization and classification.  

Module Description

Lectures

 

Introduction

1.Systems and signals description and classification

2.Basic signals, the unit step and the impulse signals

3.Mathematical models of LTI systems

4.Time response of LTI systems to the complex exponential excitation.

5.LTI systems and Convolution 

6.Circuit theory revisited (Basic circuit elements, the operational amplifier, integrators and differentiators, analog computers). 

7.The Fourier series

8.The Fourier transform and its application in circuits

9.The Laplace Transform

10.Application of the Laplace Transform in LTI systems and circuits

11.System and circuit functions, pole-zero plots, 

12.Frequency response and Bode plots. 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Student evaluation is performed in the language of instruction.

 

Final written exam on all taught material (80%) 

Homework Assignments turned in during the semester (20%)

 

Final written exam includes development questions and problem solving questions. Students are provided with a concise mathematic formulae consultation list. 5 questions are typically given; 3 or 4 out of them have to be answered. 

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.H.G. Dimopoulos, Signals, Systems & Circuits (Basic textbook in Greek distributed to the students free of charge)

2.Athanasios Papoulis, Circuits and Systems - A Modern Approach, McGraw-Hill

3.E. Kudeki, D.C. Munson Jr, Analog Signals and Systems, Pearson Prentice Hall

4.C. L.Phillips, J. M. Parr, E. A. Riskin. Signals, Systems and Transforms, Prentice Hall

5.Chi-Tsong Chen, Signals and Systems, Oxford University Press

6.Alan V. Oppenheim, Alan S. Willsky, Signals and Systems, Prentice-Hall

7.William D. Stanley, Transform Circuit Analysis for Engineering and Technology, Prentice Hall

8.J.W.Nilsson, S.A. Riedel, Electric Circuits, Addison Wesley

9.R.C. Dorf, J.A. Svoboda, Introduction to Electric Circuits, John Wiley

10.C.A. Desoer, E.S. Kuh, Basic Circuit Theory, McGraw-Hill 

11.Paul M. Chirlian, "Signals and Filters", Van Nostrand Reinhold 

ARCHITECTURE AND ORGANISATION OF MICROCOMPUTERS II

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  face to face
Weekly Hours:  Lect.: 2, Lab.: 2
ECTS:  4
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course module students possess advanced knowledge, skills and competences in the subject of Architecture and Organization of Microcomputers that enable them to:

•Describe by block diagrams the inner architecture and organization of 16, 24, and 32-bit microprocessors, 

•Select the appropriate implementation of a microcomputer system for the needs of the specific application addressed,

•Use appropriate tools to program a microprocessor in machine language or in symbolic language,

•Interpret and check the validity of the results of the programs developed, both at the system and at the user level, 

•Analyse microcomputer system applications problems and construct solutions (design microcomputer systems) under technical and budget constraints,

•Collaborate in a team for the integral addressing (analysis – synthesis) of complex microcomputer systems design and development methods at the hardware and at the software level, for the assessment of alternative solutions and for decision making towards implementation.

Module Description

Lectures 

 

1. Principles of the structure of the 16, 24 and 32 bits microprocessors

2. Internal organization, registers, units

3. Protected and real mode of operation

4. Memory models

5. Descriptors

6. Instruction set I

7. Instruction set II

8. Assembly programming I

9. Assembly programming II

10. Hardware and software interrupts

11. Cache and secondary memory of the microcomputer system

12. Ports and peripheral devices

13. Operating systems

 

Laboratory Experiments:

 

1. Introduction, safety regulations

2. I/O instructions

3. Interrupts

4. Stepper motor operation

5. D/A operation

6. Debug I

7. Debug II

8. Debug III

9. Assembler I

10. Assembler II

11. Assembler III

12. Subroutines

13. Integrated project

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final grade = Theory part grade x 60% + Lab part grade x 40%

 

Theory Part grade: 

Final written exam (60%) 

Midterm exam (30%)

Participation (10%)

 

Final Exam includes

•Problem solving on microprocessor operation

•Design of memory interface circuits and peripherals,

•Symbolic language programming

•Programming of peripheral units,

•Interpretation of given code and assessment of its results.

 

Lab part grade:

Average of all grades received at each weekly Lab Experiment

Recommended or required Bibliography

Essential reading

1. Computer System Architecture, Morris Mano, Prentice Hall.

2. Computer Organization and Architecture, Stallings, Prentice Hall.

3. Essentials of Computer Organization and Architecture, Null & Lobur, Jones & Bartlett Publ.

 

Recommended Books

1. HENNESSY, J. and D. PATTERSON, Computer Architecture-A Quantitative Approach, Morgan-Kaufmann Publishers. 

2. WILLIAMS, R., Computer Systems Architecture, Pearson Education. 

3. BREY, B., The Intel Microprocessors, Prentice Hall (Pearson Education).

4. SINGH, A. and W. TRIEBEL, 16 bit and 32-bit Microprocessors, Architecture, Software and Interfacing Techniques, Prentice Hal

DIGITAL SYSTEMS DESIGN

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  face to face
Weekly Hours:  Lect.: 4, Lab.: 2
ECTS:  7
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The course is based on the fundamental elements of logic circuit design offered by the prerequisite module on Logic Circuit Design and aims at the: 

•consolidation of the design methodologies for combinational and sequential digital systems,

•knowledge and use of hardware description languages (VHDL) for system modeling and simulation,

•implementation of digital systems on reconfigurable programmable logic devices (CPLDs and FPGAs),

•study of different memory structures and technologies,

•experience acquisition on the complete digital system design cycle using CAD tools.

 

Upon successful completion of this course module students possess advanced knowledge, skills and competences in the subject of Digital Systems Design that enable them to:

 

•understand the functionality of digital systems,

•analyze and synthesize digital modules and circuits for a wide application range,

•design and implement hardware digital systems incorporating memory modules,

•model, simulate and implement digital circuits using hardware description languages and CAD tools,

•Interpret the specifications of programmable reconfigurable devices and select the appropriate for the application in hand.

Module Description

Lectures

•Introduction

       i. Hardware description languages

       ii. Logic circuit synthesis

      iii. Reconfigurable logic devices (CPLD, FPGA)

•VHDL principles

     i. Behavioral description

      ii. Structural description

•Building blocks of combinational and sequential circuits in VHDL (Logic gates, binary functions, multiplexers, flip-flops, registers, counters etc)

•Arithmetic units (Serial and parallel adder/subtractor, multiplier)

•Memory structures (RAM, ROM, EPROM, Flash).

•Synchronous sequential circuit design

•Digital system implementation technologies

 

Laboratory

Ten laboratory exercises covering all module topics either by using commercial CAD tools for design and simulation of digital circuits or by implementing low complexity modules on reconfigurable devices.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final course grade = Lectures part grade x 60% + Laboratory part grade x 40%

 

The final written exam of the theoretical part of the module includes exercises and design problems of graded difficulty. The module content as well as test examples (solved and unsolved) are available to the students through the course web page. Students are allowed to bring any related book during examination. 

 

The evaluation of the laboratory part is performed through:

•Oral or written test during lab exercise implementation (20%), 

•Mid term exam (20%)

•Final exam (60%)

Recommended or required Bibliography

 

Essential reading

1.BROWN, ST.,VRANESIC, Z., Fundamentals of Digital Logic with VHDL Design, 3/e, McGraw-Hill Higher Education

2.V.A. Pedroni, Circuit Design and Simulation with VHDL, 2nd ed., The MIT press, 2010

3.KYRIAKIS-BITZAROS, E. D., Digital Systems Design Lab. Manual

 

Recommended Books

1.P.J. ASHENDEN, Digital Design (VHDL),An Embedded Systems Approach Using VHDL,  1st Ed., Morgan Kaufmann

2.MORRIS MANO, M., and KIME, C.R., Logic and Computer Design Fundamentals, Pearson Education, 4/e, 2008.

3.MORRIS MANO, M., CILETTI, M., Digital Design, 4/e, Prentice Hall. 

4.GAJSKI D.D., Principles of Digital Design, Prentice Hall; 1/e, 1996.

INTRODUCTION TO TELECOMMUNICATIONS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Face to face  
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 2

Laboratory, 2

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

This course provides the first contact of the students with the field of Telecommunications; therefore, the curriculum to introduce basic concepts and familiarize the students with the wide object of Telecommunications.

 

In the theoretical part (lectures), for the analysis and the description of the various systems and parameters mathematical expressions are used, a deeper mathematical analysis is avoided on purpose, so as to help the students focus on the basic concepts.

Special attention is given to the understanding of the telecommunication principles in combination with practical applications, since related systems and devices are used every day (radio, television, cellular phones, multimedia, etc.). To this end, the students are given exercises which combine the theoretical knowledge and tools with practical applications. 

Furthermore, in order to provide the students combined knowledge with experimental procedures, the theoretical module is connected to the laboratory exercises.

 

Upon successful completion of this course module students possess advanced knowledge, skills and competences in the subject of Telecommunications that enable them to:

 

•Understand and possess the basic concepts, principles and tools for the description of telecommunication signals and systems.

•Understand and possess the basic concepts, principles and characteristics/parameters of modulations systems, analog-to-digital conversion systems, time/frequency division multiplexing, noise in telecommunication systems.

•Describe theoretically and draw in block diagram form the operation of various telecommunication sub-systems (transmitter, receiver, etc.) using mathematical expressions/tools.

•Describe and analyze the operation of various telecommunication sub-systems using related computer software tools.

•Study experimentally the basic characteristics of various telecommunication sub-systems, and  record performance parameters using measuring instruments (oscilloscope).

•Collaborate in a team to analyze a composite telecommunication problem and synthesize a solution.

•Evaluate alternative solutions and select the appropriate for a given problem. 

Module Description

Lectures:

 

1.Introduction to telecommunication signals (categories, expressions, basic signals, etc.).

2.Telecommunication signals in the time/frequency domain. Introduction to Fourier transform. Filters (categories, properties, applications).

3.Logarithmic scale and application in telecommunications (gain, loss, definitions and applications of dB, dBm).

4.Principles of modulation (baseband signals, frequency shift). Introduction to amplitude modulation AM.

5.Alternatives of AM modulation (DSB, DSB-SC, SSB). Characteristics/parameters of AM modulation using single frequency. Digital amplitude modulation.

6.AM demodulation (coherent detection, envelope detection).

7.Introduction to angle modulation. Frequency modulation FM. Digital frequency modulation.

8.Characteristics/parameters of FM modulation using single frequency. FM demodulation.

9.Sampling and signal reconstruction principles. Sampling theorem – analysis using Fourier transform.

10.Quantization and coding. Baseband pulse code modulation.

11.Time/frequency multiplexing.

12.Basics of noise in telecommunication systems.

13.Analysis of a telecommunication link using power budget. Applications.

 

Laboratory Experiments:

 

1.Introduction and rules.

2.Familiarization with lab equipment and basic measurements.

3.Introduction to modulation. Computer simulation of amplitude modulation/demodulation (AM).

4.Experimental study of amplitude modulation/demodulation (ΑΜ).

5.Introduction to angle modulation. Computer simulation of frequency modulation/demodulation (FM).

6.Experimental study of frequency modulation/demodulation (FΜ).

7.Introduction to sampling and signal reconstruction. Computer simulation.

8.Experimental study of signal sampling and reconstruction system.

9.Computer simulation of signal quantization and coding.

10.Experimental study of signal quantization and pulse code modulation systems. 

11.Introduction to digital modulation of analog carrier.

12.Student’s time.

13. Lab examinations. 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final grade = Theory part grade x 60% + Lab part grade x 40%

 

Theory part grade: Final written exam on all taught material.

Exam includes development questions and computational - problem solving questions.

 

Lab part grade: 

•Written tests during the semester

•Assessment of lab reports and student presence  

Recommended or required Bibliography

Essential reading

1.S. Haykin, M. Moher, “Communication Systems”, 5th edition 2010, Papasotiriou Ed., Athens, Greece.

2.H. Taub, D.L. Schilling, «Principles of Telecommunication Systems”, 3rd edition 2006, Tziolas Eds., Thessaloniki, Greece.

3.J. Proakis, M. Salehi, “Communications Systems», 1st edition 2003, University of Athens Eds., Greece.

4.A. Nasiopoulos, “Telecommunications”, 1st edition 2007, Arakynthos Eds., Athens, Greece.

5.Lecture notes by the instructor (available on-line).

6.Laboratory handbook by the instructor.   

TRANSMISSION LINES

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  face to face
Weekly Hours:  Lect.: 2, Lab.: 2
ECTS:  4
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course module students possess advanced knowledge, skills and competences in the subject of Transmission Lines that enable them to:

 

•interpret the wave propagation phenomena through transmission lines at high frequencies,

•describe the main types of transmission lines and how they differentiate and work at high-frequency ranges up to microwave frequencies,

•explain the concept of distributed characteristics and determine the characteristic impedance of the lines,

•explain the meaning of incident and reflected waves as well as the creation of standing waves along a line,

•calculate the form of standing waves for various terminations, the input impedance of circuits of lines, and the ability to match them using stubs and λ/4 transformers,

•calculate distributed passive components at high frequencies using shorted or open lines,

•calculate the basic parameters of  lines by using the Smith chart.

Module Description

Theory

1.Introduction to types and applications of transmission lines.

2.Distributed parameters and differential equations of the uniform transmission lines. 

3.Characteristic impedance and transmission coefficient. 

4.Input impedance and transmission line networks.

5.Reflection coefficient and matched lines. 

6.Open and short circuited lines.

7.Equivalent two-port models. 

8.Lossless lines, standing wave ratio and voltage standing waves.

9.Matching techniques – use of stubs.

10.Properties of lossless lines.

11.Resonant frequencies of short and open doubly-terminated lines.

12.The Smith chart and its applications.

13.Solving transmission line problems using the Smith charts.

 

Laboratory

1.Transmission lines simulator 

2.Study of resonance conditions using the transmission lines simulator

3.Two-port circuit chain for lossy transmission lines

4.Two-port circuit chain for lossless transmission lines

5.Standing waves in High frequency Lecher device

6.Load detection using Lecher and Smith chart

7.Standing waves in waveguides

8.T resonators measurement using a Network Analyzer

9.Solving Transmission lines problems using a simulation software

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final grade is the weighted average of 

(i)Lecture part grade x 60%

(ii)Laboratory part grade x 40%

 

Lecture part grade:

•Final written (100%)

 

Laboratory part grade:

Average of the grades received in each weekly Laboratory Experiment. 

Recommended or required Bibliography

Essential reading

Lecture notes

 

Recommended Books

•JOHNSON, A., Transmission Lines and Networks, McGraw-Hill.

•CHIPMAN, R.A., Transmission lines, McGraw-Hill.

•SINNEMA, W., Electronic Transmission Technology, Lines, Waves and Antennas, Prentice Hall.

•ORFANIDIS, S.J., Electromagnetic Waves and Antennas.

5th Semester

STOCHASTIC SIGNALS AND SYSTEMS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  face to face
Weekly Hours:  Lect.: 2, Lab.: 2
ECTS:  4
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

 

Upon successful completion of this course module students possess advanced knowledge, skills and competences in the subject of Stochastic Signals and Systems that enable them to:

 

•model and analyze random phenomena using probability theory and statistics,

•calculate probabilities of random events and moments of random variables,

•find the cumulative distribution function and the probability density function of a function of a random variable,

•calculate probabilities and moments of jointly distributed random variables,

•simulate discrete and continuous random variables,

•analyze the transmission of random signals through linear and time invariant systems,

•estimate the mean, autocorrelation function and power spectral density of random signals,

•evaluate the performance of communication systems in the presence of noise. 

Module Description

Lectures:

1.Axioms of probability, conditional probability and independence

2.Combinatorial analysis

3.Discrete and continuous random variables

4.Moments and characteristic functions

5.Functions of one random variable

6.Jointly distributed random variables

7.Sequences of random variables and limit theorems

8.Description of random signals and statistical averages 

9.Stationary signals and linear systems

10.Random signals in the frequency domain

11.Gaussian and white signals

12.Bandpass random signals

 

Laboratory Experiments:

1.MATLAB overview

2.Simulation of a discrete random variable

3.Discrete random variables A, Bernoulli trials and Binomial distribution

4.Discrete random variables B, geometric and Poisson distributions

5.Simulation of a continuous random variable

6.Continuous random variables A, uniform and exponential distributions

7.Continuous random variables B, Gaussian and Rayleigh distributions 

8.Jointly Gaussian random variables

9.Autocorrelation function and power spectral density

10.Bandpass random signals 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Student evaluation is performed in the language of instruction.

 

Final course grade = Lectures part grade x 60% + Laboratory part grade x 40%

 

Lectures part grade: 

•Midterm Exam (25%)

•Final written exam (75%)

 

Final written exam includes development questions and problem solving questions. Students are provided with a concise mathematic formulae consultation list.

 

Laboratory part grade:

•Oral evaluation in the lab, on a weekly basis (10%)

•Midterm project evaluation (45%)

•End of term project evaluation (45%)

Recommended or required Bibliography

Essential reading

1.Papoulis, A., “Probability, Random Variables and Stochastic Processes”, 4th Edition, McGraw-Hill.

2.Ross, S., “Introduction to Probability and Statistics for Engineers and Scientists”, Academic Press.

 

Recommended Books

1.Bertsekas, D. and Tsitsiklis, J., “Introduction to Probability”, 2nd Edition, Athena Scientific, 2008.

2.Stark, H. and Woods, J., “Probability, Random Processes, and Estimation Theory for Engineers”, 2nd Edition, Prentice Hall, 1994.

3.Feller, W., “An Introduction to Probability Theory and Its Applications”, 3rd Edition, Wiley, 1968.

ELECTRONIC FILTERS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Face to face  
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 4

Laboratory, 2 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

 

Upon successful completion of this course module students possess advanced knowledge, skills and competences in the subject of Electronic Filters that enable them to:

 

1.Understand the operation of electronic filters and describe them in the frequency domain from their magnitude characteristics

2.Design lowpass, highpass, bandpass and band reject passive and active-RC filters with all-pole and rational approximations using the appropriate mathematics or filter tables. 

3.Use software system simulation tools to verify filter specifications in the frequency domain 

4.Use software tools to design frequency selective electronic circuits.

5.Collaborate with fellow students in a team, in order to solve complex filter design and implementation problems 

Module Description

Lectures

 

1.Introduction to filter theory and design, ideal filters, filter specifications

2.Normalization, Frequency and impedance scaling

3.All-pole and Rational approximations

4.Butterworth lowpass approximation and determination of the transfer function

5.Chebyshev lowpass approximation and determination of the transfer function

6.Frequency transformations, design of highpass, bandpass and band reject filters

7.Active-RC realizations of the transfer function of the filter

8.Elliptic (Cauer) approximation and filter design

9.Introduction to passive filter design

10.Design of doubly terminated passive LC ladder filters using Butterworth, Chebyshev and Cauer approximations

11.Active-RC simulation of passive doubly terminated LC filters

 

Laboratory

1.Use of Mathematical software tools in circuit analysis and filter design (Mathcad, MATLAB)

2.Use of simulation software (PSpice) 

3.Use of filter design software tools (Filter Solutions, FilterWiz, FilterPro, FilterCAD)

Weekly Laboratory exercises are designed every semester and students have to work on two filter design projects. 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Student evaluation is performed in the language of instruction.

 

Final course grade = Lectures part grade x 60% + Laboratory part grade x 40%

 

Lectures part grade: 

•Final written exam (100%)

 

Final written exam includes development questions and problem solving questions. Students are provided with a concise mathematic formulae consultation list.

 

Laboratory part grade:

•Oral evaluation in the lab, on a weekly basis

•Presentation and examination on two laboratory projects on filter design 

Recommended or required Bibliography

Essential reading

 

1.Hercules G. Dimopoulos, Electronic Filters (Passive-Active), Basic textbook in Greek distributed to all students free of charge.

2.Hercules G. Dimopoulos, Electronic Filters, Springer

3.T. Deliyannis, Y. Sun, J.K. Fidler, Continuous-Time Active Filter Design, CRC Press

4.R. Schaumann, E. Van Valkenburg, Design of Analog Filters, Oxford University Press

5.L. D. Paarmann, Design and Analysis of Analog Filters, Kluwer

6.A. Williams, F. Taylor, Electronic Filter Design Handbook, McGraw Hill

7.S. Winder, Analog and Digital Filter Design, Elsevier

8.Wai-Kai Chen, The Circuits and Filters Handbook, CRC Press and IEEE Press

9.Kendall L. Su, "Analog Filters", Chapman & Hall

10.Paul M. Chirlian, "Signals and Filters", Van Nostrand Reinhold

11.G. Daryanani, "Principles of Active Network Synthesis and Design", John Willey 

POWER ELECTRONICS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Face to face  
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 4

Laboratory, 2 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

This course provides to the students their first contact on the field of Power Electronics; therefore, the curriculum to introduce basic concepts and familiarize the students with the wide object of Power & Energy Management.

During the recent years there is increasing need for improvement of the competitiveness of the productive companies, especially of those of the industrial sector. This is mainly consisted in steps towards energy saving and optimization of the production procedures. Recent technology in electronics has offered many tools for this purpose. Power Electronics is the tool, through which the energy is much better controlled and offered in an optimal way in order to better serve the load and save energy at the same time. These power converters are also used in order to convert and adjust the energy produced by Renewable Energy Sources (photovoltaics, wind turbines, etc) in a usable and suitable form for the consumers.

Power Electronics course aims in the familiarization with the main controllable switches, the converter types, their operational characteristics, and their main design principles. The students that follow this course (theoretical and laboratory) will be in place to understand the advantages that Power Electronics are offering and use this knowledge further on.

In the theoretical part (lectures), for the analysis and the description of the various converter topologies and parameters mathematical expressions are used, a deeper mathematical analysis is avoided on purpose, so as to help the students focus on the basic concepts.

In order to deeply and fully understand this course, knowledge of other subjects is necessary such as: Electronics, Energy management, Automatic Control Systems, Materials Technology, Mathematics, Measurements techniques, etc.

Furthermore, in order to provide the students with combined knowledge and experimental procedures, the theoretical module is connected to the laboratory exercises, which are performed in complete coordination with the theoretical knowledge obtained so far.

 

Upon successful completion of this course module students possess advanced knowledge, skills and competences in the subject of Power Electronics that enable them to:

 

•Understand and possess the basic concepts and operating principles of power electronic controllable semiconductors

•Define the type of the various converter topologies.

•Explain the main operation principles of the power electronic semiconductors as controllable switches in various converter topologies.

•Describe theoretically and draw in block diagram the control strategy and pulses production methodology for the power control of the supplied power to the load.

•Describe and analyze the operation of various converter sub-systems when supplying different loads (R, R-L, motors, etc).

•Study experimentally the basic characteristics of various converter circuits and record performance parameters using measuring instruments (oscilloscope).

•Collaborate in a team to study and design a medium difficulty power electronic topology for Renewable Energy Sources or industrial purpose and synthesize a solution.

•Carry out maintenance and trouble-shooting procedures for power electronic devices in a given setup, in cooperation with the supplier company. 

Module Description

 

Lectures

 

1.Introduction - Types and characteristics of controlled switches and power diodes

2.Analysis of simple circuits with dc or ac input, with diodes or thyristors and under various loads (R, R-L, motors, etc)

3.Rectifiers (AC-DC): 

-Single phase half bridge rectification (ac-dc) with diodes and thyristors

-Single phase full bridge rectification (ac-dc) with diodes and thyristors

-Three phase full bridge rectification (ac-dc) with diodes and thyristors

-Firing power electronic semiconductors – Electronic Pulse Production level 

In all different topologies studied, a full presentation of input and output waveforms as well as the corresponding mathematical analysis takes place.

4.AC-AC converters. Complete analysis of the operational principles and presentation of input & output waveforms supported by corresponding mathematical analysis.

5.DC-DC converters:

-Step-up (Boost converters)

-Step-down (Buck converters)

-Buck-Boost converter topologies

-Pulse Width Modulation technique

Full presentation of input and output waveforms as well as the corresponding mathematical analysis takes place.

6.DC-AC inverters:

-Main topologies and operation principles

-Pulse Width Modulation technique for voltage regulation

-Sinusoidal PWM for harmonics reduction

Full presentation of input and output waveforms as well as the corresponding mathematical analysis takes place.

7.Applications of Power Electronics in Industry, Renewable Energy Sources projects, etc. Search project for recent power semiconductor products. Presentation of future trends. 

 

Laboratory Experiments:

1.Introduction, Laboratory rules and Safety issues.

2.Familiarization with lab equipment and basic measurements. Power measurements with oscilloscope.

3.Three-phase alternator – 1st part / Energy production.

4.Three-phase alternator – 2nd part / Power supply.

5.Electronic switches – Smooth connection of large loads to the power system through power electronic devices.

6.Half bridge ac/dc rectifier – 1 Thyristor with a UJT pulse production device.

7.Full bridge ac/dc rectifier – 4 Thyristors with a pulse production device - Part I.

8.Full bridge ac/dc rectifier – 4 Thyristors with a pulse production device - Part II.

9.AC/AC converter – A TRIAC power part with a UJT pulse production device.

10.DC/DC step-up converter.

11.Photovoltaic system simulation for technical characteristics and efficiency experiment.

12.Student’s time.

13. Lab examinations. 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final course grade = Lectures part grade x 60% + Laboratory part grade x 40%

 

Lectures part grade: 

Final written exam on all taught material (100%)

Exam includes multiple choice questions, design questions and relative assessment questions. 

 

Lab part grade: 

Assessment of lab reports and student presence Participation in all lab experiments and oral evaluation – (20%)

Mid-term evaluation test (40%)

End-term evaluation test (40%) 

Recommended or required Bibliography

Recommended Books

1.MANIAS ST., Power Electronics, Papasotiriou, Athens 2014. 

2.RASHID M., Power Electronics Handbook, Academic Press, USA, 2001. 

3.ΜΟΗΑΝ et al., Power Electronics, Tziolas Publ. Thessaloniki. 

4.POLITIS G. and TSIALAS C., Power Electronics, Self Publishing, 2011.

5.Laboratory handbook by the instructor. 

 

Scientific Journals:

1.IEEE Transactions in Power Electronics

2.IEEE Transactions in Power Delivery

3.IEEE Transactions in Industry Applications

4.IJAREEIE - International Journal of Advanced Research in Electrical, Electronics and Instrumentation Εngineering 

DIGITAL SIGNAL PROCESSING

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Face to face  
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 4

Laboratory, 2 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course module students possess advanced knowledge, skills and competences in the subject of Digital Signal Processing that enable them to:

 

1.Describe general and specific DSP processes by block diagrams. 

2.Select the appropriate form of digital system description, among alternatives, for the problem at hand. 

3.Perform spectral analysis of digital signals and systems using simulation tools for the computation of the digital output signal. 

4.Interpret the results of spectral analysis of digital signals and systems, so as to conclude on their characterization and classification. 

5.Analyze signal processing problems under realistic application scenarios (processing of audiovisual / biomedical / telecom signals) and compose solutions (design digital systems) on the basis of methods taught in the course. 

6.Collaborate with fellow students in a team, in order to thoroughly address complex DSP problems (analysis – synthesis) and to critically evaluate alternative solutions, leading to decisions as to the feasibility of hardware implementations.  

Module Description

Lectures

UNIT Ι: Introduction

1.General placement of the DSP subject in the field of study of the electronics and telecommunications engineer. Survey of major modern DSP applications, with emphasis on telecoms. Placement of the DSP course and connections with previous and next semester courses. 

2.Basic mathematics background revisited (Laplace, Z and Fourier Transforms and Inverses). Discrete-time versus continuous-time signals and systems. Discrete Fourier Transform and Inverse, properties. 

3.Simulation and graphics display of discrete-time signals and systems in Matlab. 

UNIT ΙΙ: A-to-D and D-to-A conversion

1.Fundamental theorems and methods, electronic circuits, survey of contemporary hardware available (A/D and D/A convertors, DSP boards) and selection criteria. 

2.Introduction to A/D and D/A devices and systems using modern hardware; application to speech and audio signals. Experimental acquaintance with the fundamental characteristics of A/D conversion and their impact on digital signal quality. 

UNIT ΙΙΙ: Elementary DSP functions and properties

1.Instrumental DSP functions and their properties: convolution, (auto-)correlation); methods for their computation in the time and the frequency domains. 

2.Use of simulation software for the computation and representation of the correlation and the convolution of digital signals / systems. 

UNIT ΙV: The Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT) and its fast implementations (FFT)

1.Discrete Fourier Transform, Fast Fourier Transform fundamentals. Algorithms for their computation and algorithmic complexity. Hardware implementations. 

UNIT V: Linear Prediction

1.Introduction of the central notion of linear prediction in discrete-time systems, through the solution of linear problems of special forms. Prediction error and optimal prediction. System modeling. 

UNIT VI: Modern Spectral Analysis

1.Modern spectral analysis, parametric and non-parametric Spectral analysis of stationary and quasi-stationary signals: Fourier-based methods, examples. Spectral analysis of non-stationary signals: time-frequency and time-scale representations, examples. 

2.Experimental application of spectral analysis methods in real signals, stationary or not. Use of simulation software for the representation of the spectra in order to comparatively evaluate the quality of the results. 

UNIT VII: Introduction to digital filter design

1.Major design methods for FIR and IIR filters. Window functions and windowing. Introduction to adaptive digital filters. 

2.Design and application of digital filters in specific speech and audio processing scenarios. Experimental acquaintance with digital filters design and comparative evaluation of the quality of the results. 

 

Laboratory

 

1.TMS320C5505 Digital Signal Processor and the Integrated Development Environment “Code Composer Studio v.5” of Texas Instr. Inc. 

2.Echo and reverberation

3.Sine waves generation

4.Alien voices generation

5.Dual tone multi-frequency signal generation 

6.Comb digital filters

7.FIR digital filters

8.IIR digital filters

9.Adaptive filters

10.Adaptive filters applied to active noise reduction (ANR). 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final course grade = Lectures part grade x 60% + Laboratory part grade x 40%

 

Lectures part grade: 

Midterm written exam – 2 hours (30%) 

Final written exam – 2 hours (70%) 

 

Final written exam covers all taught material. During the exam, students may consult a list of formulae provided by the examiner as a reminder. Students must prove mastery of the material through stating and interpreting definitions of all quantities, handling relations among quantities and solving of design problems based on specs.

 

Laboratory part grade:

Participation in all lab experiments and oral evaluation – (20%)

Mid-term on-line test (40%)

End-term on-line test (40%) 

Recommended or required Bibliography

Essential reading

1.HAYES, M., Digital Signal Processing, Schaum's Outline Series, 2nd Edition, Paperback 2011.

2.OPPENHEIM, A.V., SCHAFER, R.W., BUCK, J.R., Discrete-Time Signal Processing, Prentice-Hall, 1999.

3.PROAKIS, G., MANOLAKIS, D., Digital Signal Processing, Prentice-Hall, 3rd. ed., 1996. 

4.TMS320C5505 USB Stick Teaching Materials, Texas Instruments – University Programme, 2010.

 

Recommended Books

1.HAYKIN, S., Adaptive Filter Theory, 4th Edition, Prentice-Hall, 2001. 

2.PORAT, B., A course in Digital Signal Processing, Wiley, 1997.

3.PROAKIS, J., RADER, C.M., LING, F., NIKIAS, C.L., Advanced Digital Signal Processing, McMillan, New York, 1992. 

4.KALOUPTSIDIS, N., THEODORIDIS, S., Adaptive System Identification and Signal Processing Algorithms, Prentice-Hall Intl., UK, 1993.

5.PORAT, B., Digital Processing of Random Signals, Prentice-Hall, New Jersey, 1994.

6.GOLD, B., MORGAN, N., Speech and Audio Signal Processing, Wiley, 2000.

7.QUATIERI, T. F., Discrete-time Speech Signal Processing, Prentice-Hall, 2000.

8.RABINER, L.R., SCHAFER, R.W., Introduction to Digital Speech Processing, Foundation & Trends in Signal Processing, 2007. 

QUALITY ASSURANCE SYSTEMS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Face to face  
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 2 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The objective of this course is to analyze modern Quality Assurance Systems and focus on their application in academic institutions. 

 

Upon successful completion of this course module students possess advanced knowledge, skills and competences in the subject of Quality Assurance that enable them to:

 

1.Know, recognize, distinguish, categorize all different systems and quality standards.

2.Select, study and apply a certain standard,

3.Analyze quality problems in realistic environments and implementation scenarios,

4.Design methods for the application of the standards and observe the quality according to the space or procedure based on the relevant standards.

5.Cooperate in groups in order to achieve the above goals. 

Module Description

Lectures:

 

•In accordance with the objective of this course, the existing situation is being analyzed (structures, organization, administration), the Quality Assurance System prototype ISO 9001:2000 is being analyzed, as well as the main principles and demands and the ways that such System that focuses on the customer satisfaction (a.k.a. the student and the society) may be applied. 

•An effort for the documentation of the Quality System is in process to accord with the standard ISO 9001:2000 via a quality management manual, the Quality Control Procedures and the Technical Instructions and control forms so as all the above are in correspondence to the Lab Policy and the demands of the standard. 

•This course is a useful tool, not only to enrich one’s knowledge on quality issues but to understand and apply a Quality Management System according to the Standard ISO 9001:2000 in any academic environment (Department, School, institution). The course is composed of seven modules, followed by the Quality Management manual and completed by the procedure, the documents, and the instructions. 

 

The course is composed of seven modules or chapters, which are followed by the quality management manual and completed by the procedures, the documents and the instructions.

•Chapter 1, “The meaning of Quality” a summary of the meaning of Quality and the basic stages of programming are being presented. 

•Chapter 2, “The standard ISO 9000:2000” a general view of the standards is being presented. 

•Chapter 3, “Description of the demands of the standard”. The Quality Assurance System is being analyzed, its importance and its demands are being explained as well as the requirements for its development. 

•Chapter 4, “Total Quality Management”. It refers to the Total Quality Management which is philosophy in Management. The Total Quality management is applied to all levels of a business, an organization, an educational institution and expresses the relationships with the students, the suppliers, the human resources and the information sharing inside and outside of the Institution. 

•Chapter 5, “Cost”. It summarizes the description of the Quality Cost. 

•Chapter 6, “Conclusions”. It describes the reasons why a business should use the ISO Standard, it refers to the main application difficulties as well as to the advantages of such use. 

•Chapter 7, “Summing up”. It refers to the reasons why an ISO 9000 System is successful or why it fails. 

•“Quality Management Manual” and its application to a University/University of Applied Sciences. Sample Procedures, Instructions and the Documents.  

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final written exams on the taught material (80%).

Individual work on taught material related issues, in the form of case study or project is also evaluated (20%)

 

The exams are held in greek and include: 

•development of a given issue

•answers to questions of judgment and 

•answers to multiple choice questions  

Recommended or required Bibliography

Recommended Books

1.The development of ISO 9001:2000, John Kostis, Synchroni Ekdotiki Publications, Athens, Greece (in greek)

2.Design for Quality, vol. A, Char. Angelopoulos, Hellenic Open University (in greek)

3.Total Quality, vol. B, St. Stefanatos, Hellenic Open University (in greek)

4.Quality Management, vol. C, Nik. Psychas, Hellenic Open University (in greek)

5.The cost of quality, vol. D, Andr. Tzogios, Hellenic Open University (in greek) 

6.Programming for Quality, vol. E, Andr. Tzogias, Hellenic Open University (in greek)

7.ISO 9000:2000  I. Arvanitogiannis – L. Kouris (in greek)

8.ISO 9000 in Technical Entreprizes, Demetrios Angelides – M. Kirkinezou (in greek)

9.Construction and Services Sectors, Gower 

10.ISO 9001:2000 simplified, P. Katsampanis, Athens, (in greek)

11.http//www.iso.ch

12.http://class.eap.gr/diple 

13.Total Quality, Antony Spanos, Athens (in greek) 

FOREIGN LANGUAGE TECHNICAL TERMINOLOGY (ENGLISH)

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Face to face  
Weekly Hours: Lectures, 2 
ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course module students possess advanced knowledge, skills and competences in the subject of English Language Technical Terminology that enable them to:

 

1.Understand scientific texts relative to the field of Electronics Engineering, either globally (global understanding) or thoroughly (scanning-through comprehension)

2.Acquire the terminology and syntax of scientific texts through various methods and techniques.

3.Analyze the structure and organization elements of scientific speech on multiple levels (sentence, paragraph, text)

4.Produce oral speech and construct written speech of multiple forms (instructions, description of components, functions and processes, essay writing, reports, professional mail etc.)

 

In more detail, students will be able to:

1.Acquire and use technical vocabulary, terminology and structure connected to the field of Electronic Engineering.

2.Extract specific information from texts about components devices, structures, and processes.

3.Identify devices, components, structures, processes and explain their function.

4.Understand the features and technical specifications of different components and devices.

5.Identify and comment specific texts.

6.Draw and describe (block) diagrams.

7.Summarize the main points of a technical text.

8.Write technical instructions.

9.Write a report.

10.Describe and compare systems. 

Module Description

Study by subject:

 

1.Signal processing (translating useful signals, Analogue and digital signals).

2.Logic concepts (Historical background, combinational versus sequential logic, Bistable devices, Logic device families)

3.Semiconductor devices (semiconductors, Diodes, Transistor, Light -emitting Diode)

4.Micro-technology (Integrated Circuits, Characteristics of integrated circuit components)

5.Amplifiers (Types of Amplifiers, Operational amplifiers)

6.Filters (Filter types  Filter Transmission)

7.Transmission Media (Guided and unguided transmission media)

8.Communication Systems (Communication process, Modulation, Multiplexing

9.Sources of Information (Television, Telephony, Cellular telephone System)

10.Computers (Historical evolution, Microcomputers, Microprocessor, Memory, Binary system)

11.Computer networks (Basic connectivity, LAN technologies and network Topologies)

12.Instruments (Digital Multimeter, Oscilloscope, other general purpose instruments). 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Student evaluation is performed in the language of instruction.

 

•Final written exam (80%)

•Preparation and presentation of a project (20%) 

Recommended or required Bibliography

Essential reading

 

1.Koutsogianni Evangelia, “ENGLISH FOR ELECTRONICS AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS,” Synchroni Ekdotiki Eds., Athens, Greece. 

2.Eric H. Glendinning, John Mc Ewan, “OXFORD ENGLISH FOR ELECTRONICS”, Oxford University Press, Oxford, U.K.

3.INTERNET SOURCES (various) provided by the instructor

4.AUTHENTIC TECHNICAL READING TEXTS (various) provided by the instructor. 

6th Semester

COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Face to face  
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 4

Laboratory, 2 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course module students possess advanced knowledge, skills and competences in the subject of Communication Systems that enable them to:

 

•analyze the basic subsystems of a digital communications system,

•calculate the energy and the power  of deterministic signals,

•find the spectrum of a signal,

•estimate the power of a random signal,

•analyze a digital modulation method using its signal constellation,

•design the optimum correlation-type demodulator,

•design the optimum matched-filter-type demodulator,

•choose the appropriate detection criterion,

•calculate the probability of detection error in AWGN channels,

•compare different modulation methods with respect to power consumption and spectrum utilization. 

Module Description

Lectures:

1.Description of a digital communication system

2.Mathematical models for communication channels

3.Energy and power of deterministic signals

4.Fourier transform and the signal spectrum

5.Random signals

6.Sampling and quantization

7.Geometric representation of signals

8.Baseband and bandpass modulation methods

9.Optimum digital demodulation in AWGN channels

10.Probability of detection error in AWGN channels

11.Comparison of digital modulation methods

12.Multiplexing and multiple access

13.Digital transmission on fading multipath channels 

 

Laboratory Experiments:

1.MATLAB overview

2.Periodic signals and the Fourier series

3.Energy signals and the Fourier transform

4.Quantization and PCM systems

5.Autocorrelation function and power spectral density

6.Baseband and bandpass random signals 

7.Comparison of digital modulation methods (multiple sessions) 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Student evaluation is performed in the language of instruction.

 

Final course grade = Lectures part grade x 60% + Laboratory part grade x 40%

 

Lectures part grade: 

•Midterm Exam (25%)

•Final written exam (75%)

Final written exam includes development questions and problem solving questions. Students are provided with a concise mathematic formulae consultation list.

 

Laboratory part grade:

•Oral evaluation in the lab, on a weekly basis (10%)

•Midterm project evaluation (45%)

•End of term project evaluation (45%) 

Recommended or required Bibliography

Essential reading

1.Proakis J. and M. Salehi, Communication Systems Engineering,2nd Edition, Prentice Hall, 2002.

2.Sklar, B., Digital Communications, 2nd Edition, Prentice Hall, 2001.

 

Recommended Books

1.Haykin, S. and M. Moher, Communication Systems, 5th Edition, Wiley, 2010.

2.Glover I. and Grant P., Digital Communications, 2nd Edition, Prentice Hall, 2004.

3.Rappaport T., Wireless Communications, 2nd Edition, Prentice Hall, 2002. 

AUTOMATIC CONTROL SYSTEMS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Face to face  
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 4

Laboratory, 2 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course module students possess advanced knowledge, skills and competences in the subject of Automatic Control Systems that enable them to:

 

1.Describe all basic ACS structures by block diagrams. 

2.Translate readily a time-domain ACS description into a frequency-domain one and vice-versa; select the appropriate and simpler possible form for the problem at hand. 

3.Use software system simulation tools to compute the ACS output in the time and in the frequency domains. Assess the quality of the output with respect to given specifications and estimate the error between actual and desired output. 

4.State and apply the algebraic and the graphics ACS stability criteria, simulate each criterion in software, interpret the results; assess and characterize an ACS using the results and thus perform a full ACS stability study.

5.Analyze a realistic problem that requires controller / compensator design, judge and select the appropriate among alternative controller architectures taught in the course; design the controller in block diagram level and simulate the ACS including the controller in software. 

6.Collaborate with fellow students in a team, in order to thoroughly address complex controller design problems (analysis – synthesis) under realistic conditions and to critically evaluate alternative solutions, leading to decisions as to the feasibility of hardware implementations. 

Module Description

Lectures

 

UNIT Ι: Introduction to closed-loop systems and block diagram simplification

1.Open- and closed-loop systems, Feedback (positive and negative), Impulse Response and Transfer function descriptions of Linear Systems, Transfer function extraction examples.

2.Block diagrams; simplification of a block diagram into a simpler equivalent one using equivalence rules. Generalization from 1-by-1 to M-by-N I/O systems.

UNIT ΙΙ: Time domain response of 1st and 2nd order systems – Errors in the Steady-state.

1.Computation of the time response of 1st and 2nd order systems for basic input waveforms (sinusoidal, step, ramp, parabolic). 

2.Error signal definition, Limiting value theorem, Error constants and steady-state error computation for polynomial inputs. 

UNIT ΙΙΙ: Closed-loop system stability – Definitions and Criteria  - Algebraic (Routh) and graphics (Root Locus). 

1.Linear system stability: Definitions and Criteria (algebraic – graphics). 

2.The Routh Criterion and its parametric forms. Conditional stability. 

3.Root locus – Drawing, interpretation, ACS characterization, complete 1-by-1 ACS stability study. 

UNIT IV Bode, Nyquist, Nichols Diagrams and Gain / Phase Margins. 

1.Bode diagram: Drawing, interpretation, stability study using the associated criterion. Definition, meaning and uses of gain and phase margins in conjunction with the Bode diagram. 

2.Nyquist and Nichols diagrams and associated stability criteria. Critical frequency, Niquist point. 

UNIT V: System compensation and controller design – general principles. PID controllers and parameter setting. 

1.Introduction to the system compensation, aims and controller types. Series and parallel controllers. 

2.PID controllers – applications and parameter setting (Ziegler-Nichols empirical rules). 

UNIT VI: Phase lead / lag controllers and hybrid solutions.

1.Phase lead / lag controller design for series compensation. Applications on the basis of given specs and software simulation. 

2.Parallel system compensation (velocity, acceleration). Comparative assessment of series and parallel design solutions. 

 

Laboratory

 

1.Time response of 1st and 2nd order linear systems. 

2.Frequency domain response and frequency plots (Bode, Nyquist, Nichols Diagrams).

3.Steady-state Errors in the ACS output. 

4.PID controllers.

5.Velocity control ACS (hands-on plus computer simulation, accessed remotely).

6.Liquid level control ACS (hands-on plus computer simulation, accessed remotely).

7.Position Control ACS. 

8.Sinusoidal waveform generation – 2nd order ACS (PLL). 

9.Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs).

10. Telemetric Systems based on GSM modem. 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final course grade = 

Lectures part grade x 60% + Laboratory part grade x 40%, analyzed as follows:

 

Lectures part grade: 

Midterm Exam –2 hours (30%) 

Final written exam – 2 hours (70%) 

Optional personal or group project up to 20%, final exam reduced to 50%.

 

Final written exam covers all taught material. During the exam, students may consult a list of formulae provided by the examiner as a reminder. Students must prove mastery of the material through stating and interpreting definitions of all quantities, handling relations among quantities and solving of design problems based on specs.

 

Laboratory part grade:

Lab part grade is the average of all (10) individual Lab Experiment Grades achieved by the student during the semester.

 

Lab Experiment Grade = Oral exam in class (60%) plus written test in class (40%), on the subject of the current Experiment. 

 

A written preparatory homework is assigned each week, on the subject of the Experiment scheduled for next week. 

Recommended or required Bibliography

Essential reading

1.DORF, R.C., BISHOP, R.H., Modern Control Systems, Prentice-Hall, 2000. 

2.SCHAUMS’s Outline Series on Feedback and Control Systems, 2nd Ed., McGraw-Hill Professional Publishing.

3.Laboratory notes by laboratory instructor: http://labpower.teipir.gr/index.htm 

 

Recommended Books

1.CHEN, C.-T., Linear System Theory and Design, HRW, 1981. 

2.OGATA, K., Modern Control Engineering, Prentice Hall Inc., New Jersey, 1997.

3.KUO, B.C., Automatic Control Systems, Prentice-Hall Inc., New Jersey, 1995. 

4.KAILATH, TH., Linear System Theory, Prentice-Hall, 1980. 

ELECTRONICS MEASUREMENTS-SENSORS & EMC

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Face to face  
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 2

Laboratory, 2 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course module students possess advanced knowledge, skills and competences in the subject of Electronic Measurements, Sensors and EMC that enable them to:

 

1.select the appropriate signal conditioning circuits for measuring physical and other parameters via sensors,

2.select the appropriate ADC to read sensor measurements from respective digital reading systems and data loggers,

3.identify possible interference at measurement environment and propose mitigation techniques,

4.evaluate types of sensors considering the principle of operation, the  signal conditioning circuits, accuracy, dynamics, their application fields as well as their calibration techniques,

5.analyze the signal conditioning circuits, the calibration method and the applications of a basic sensor (i.e. temperature, displacement, force, etc.),

6.use measurement data acquisition systems and develop corresponding applications in typical and graphical programming. 

Module Description

Lectures

1.Introduction to electronic measurement systems and data acquisition. 

2.OpAmp circuits for measurement systems, isolation amplifiers, V to I, V to F and C to F converters. 

3.Interference and noise in measurement systems. 

4.Temperature sensors, (principle of operation, signal conditioning and calibration)

5.Position sensors, (principle of operation, signal conditioning and calibration)

6.Stress and strain sensors, (principle of operation, signal conditioning and calibration)

7.Digital instrumentation and measurements. A/D converters and smart sensors. 

8.Electronic instrument systems (oscilloscopes, generators, spectrum, network and distortion analyzers). 

9.Instrument to computer interface IEEE 488. Graphical programming and virtual instruments.

 

Laboratory Experiments

1.Distortion analysis

2.Thermo-coupler temperature sensor

3.RTD temperature sensor

4.LVDT sensor

5.LVDC sensor

6.Hall sensor

7.Strain gauge sensor

8.Computer to instrument communication (GPIB) 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Student evaluation is performed in the language of instruction.

 

Final course grade = 

Lectures part grade x 60% + Laboratory part grade x 40%,

 

Lectures part grade results from:

Final written exam on all taught material. The exam includes:

•Multiple choice questions,

•Development questions,

•Problem solving involving sensors and measurements.

 

Laboratory part grade results from:

•Written test on two groups of lab experiments.

•Reports on lab experiments.

•Oral grade from lab participation. 

Recommended or required Bibliography

Essential reading

Lecture notes by the instructors

 

Recommended Books

1.NORTHROP, R. B. Introduction to Instrumentation and Measurements, CRC Press.

2.DOEBELIN, E.O., Measurement Systems, McGraw-Hill. 

3.KLAASSEN, K. B., Electronic Measurement and Instrumentation, Cambridge University Press.

4.PALLΑS-ARENY, R. and J. G. WEBSTER, Sensors and Signal Conditioning, Wiley.

5.FRADEN, J., Handbook of Modern Sensors, AIP.

6.KULARATNA, N., Modern Electronic Test and Measuring Instruments, IEE series.

 

7.BENTLEY, J.P., Measurement Systems, Longman. 

SOUND SYSTEMS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Face to face  
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 2

Laboratory, 2 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The objective of this course module is to provide students with an introductory coverage of a wide scientific field including all subjects an Audio/Acoustics Engineer can deal with. The module ensures that the students will have the basic knowledge/skills to develop a professional expertise in the subject of Audio/Acoustics Engineer.

During this module, the students become familiarized with issues related to the sciences of Acoustical Physics, Applied Acoustics, Electro-acoustics, and Architectural Acoustics.

 

Upon successful completion of this course module students possess advanced knowledge, skills and competences in the subject of Sound Systems that enable them to:

 

1.Know, understand and explain by drawing curves the notions of sound and sound waves, 

2.Understand the phenomena governing the acoustics of open and closed areas and design key parameters of the acoustic behaviour of the second ones,

3.Conduct measurements of sound and noise, 

4.Know and understand the principles of operation of electroacoustic devices and systems and apply them in problem solving,

5.Conduct electro-acoustic systems measurements,

6.Understand, assess and evaluate the effects of noise on humans and demonstrate correct use of noise-related Legislation. 

Module Description

Lectures:

 

1.Introduction, Subject of this Course Module, “Sound” 

2.Sound as an elastic wave

3.Measurement of Sound 1: Acoustic pressure, frequency, measurable energy-related quantities.

4.Measurement of Sound 2: Levels, Decibel, Leq, Relation between pressure-intensity-power, “adding” dB, sound spectra, A,B,C, filters, types of sounds and noises.

5.Acoustics of Open Spaces 1: Sound reflection – propagation – absorption – refraction / wave vs. geometrical approach. Equiphase surfaces, directions (rays) of propagation, Huygens principle, diffraction of sound, interaction, interference and polarization of sound waves.

6.Acoustics of Open Spaces 2: Absorption of sound by materials, absorption coefficients, porous sound absorbing materials, membrane-type absorbents, Helmholtz resonator, perforated surfaces, sound diffusers.

7.Acoustics of Open Spaces 3: Sound attenuation due to absorption by the transmission medium, because of weather conditions, Doppler-Fizzeau phenomenon, emission from sources of different geometry, ground effect on transmission, sound attenuation by sound, sound barriers

8.Room Acoustics 1: Large vs. small rooms (enclosures). Small room acoustics: parallel walls, orthogonal rooms, standing waves modes of oscillation. Large room acoustics: “good room acoustics” criteria, echo, Haas phenomenon, flutter echo, coloration, sound concentration.

9.Room Acoustics 2: Approximate statistical formulas of room acoustics, average absorption coefficient noise reduction coefficient, diffused sound intensity, mean free path, reverberation, diffuse sound field, reverberation time, calculation of reverberation in large rooms, Sabine and Norris - Eyring models.

10.Room Acoustics 3: Very large rooms, communicating rooms, non-uniform absorption, the effect of reverberation on speech, speech intelligibility measures, music, recommended reverberation times.

11.Room Acoustics 4: Propagation in large rooms, propagation over reflective surfaces - method of images, critical distance, room constant, acoustic gain of rooms, near field, far field, reverberant field, architectural acoustic design principles for large rooms.

12.Noise and Humans, Noise-Related Legislation 1: Impact of noise on hearing and other pathological effects, permissible noise limits, History of noise legislation, noise in the house, noise at work, noise dose.

13.Noise and Humans, Noise-Related Legislation 2: Noise exposure, indicators of noise and noise exposure, noise pollution, measurement units of noise and noise pollution, Greek legislation European legislation, EU Directive 2003/10/EU.

 

Laboratory Experiments:

 

Lab Project 1: Electronic Systems’ Impulse Responses 

Lab Project 2: Electroacoustic Systems’ Impulse Responses 

Lab Project 3: Measurements of Phase Characteristics and Acoustic Center of Loudspeakers

Lab Project 4: Electric Equivalents and Analogs of Loudspeakers and Loudspeaker Drivers

Lab Project 5: Distortion and Noise Measurements of Electroacoustic Systems

Lab Project 6: Room Impulse Response

Lab Project 7: Reverberation and Room Acoustic Parameters

Lab Project 8: Measurement and Analysis of Noise using Calibrated Microphone

Lab Project 9: Design and Characterization of a 2-Way Active Crossover 2 using FPAA

Lab Project 10: Audiometry, Measurement of Sounds Level Perception, Measurements based on Loudness Threshold

Lab Project 11η: Masking Effect, Measurement of Binaural Masking Level Difference

Lab Project 12: Objective Psychoacoustic Metrics. 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

 

Student evaluation is performed in the language of instruction.

 

Final course grade = 

Lectures part grade x 60% + Laboratory part grade x 40%,

 

Lectures part grade results from:

Final written exam on all taught material (80%),

Projects or assignments (20%). 

 

The exam includes:

•Multiple choice questions,

•Development questions,

•Problem solving involving sensors and measurements.

 

Laboratory part grade results from:

•Written test on two groups of lab experiments.

•Reports on lab experiments.

•Oral grade from lab participation. 

Recommended or required Bibliography

Essential reading

1.SKARLATOS D., Applied Acoustics, Gotsis Publications ISBN-13: 978-9608771017 (in Greek).

2.BERANEK L. L., MELLOW T., Acoustics: Sound Fields and Transducers, Academic Press, 2012, ISBN-13: 978-0123914217.

3.KLEINER M., Electroacoustics, CRC Press, 2013, ISBN-13: 978-1439836187.

4.ALTON EVEREST F., POHLMANN K. C., Master Handbook of Acoustics, McGraw-Hill/TAB Electronics, 2009, ISBN-13: 978-0071603324

5.ROSSING T. D., DUNN F. (ed.): Springer Handbook of Acoustics, Springer; 2nd Edition 2014, ISBN-13: 978-1493907540.

6.Lecture Notes. 

7.Laboratory Handbook (in Greek)

 

Recommended Books

1.OLSON H. F., MASSA F., Applied Acoustics, Literary Licensing, LLC, 2013, ISBN-13: 978-1258824280.

2.BERANEK L. L., Acoustics, Amer Inst of Physics; Rev Sub edition, 1986, ISBN-13: 978-0883184943.

3.BALLOU G., Electroacoustic Devices: Microphones and Loudspeakers, Focal Press, 2009, ISBN-13: 978-0240812670.

4.ALTEN S. R., Recording and Producing Audio for Media, Cengage Learning PTR, 2011, ISBN-13: 978-1435460652

5.FAHY F. J., Foundations of Engineering Acoustics, Academic Press, 2000, ISBN-13: 978-0122476655.

6.DAVID EGAN M., Architectural Acoustics, J. Ross Publishing Classics, 2007, ISBN-13: 978-1932159783. 

OPTICAL COMMUNICATIONS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Face to face 
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 2

Laboratory, 2 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course module students possess advanced knowledge, skills and competences in the subject of Optical Communications that enable them to:

 

1.present and explain the principles and operational characteristics of an optical link,

2.clarify the propagation characteristics in optical fibers,

3.illustrate the basic characteristics of optical transmitters and optical receivers, 

4.describe the operating principle and uses of optical network components such as optical couplers, filters, amplifiers and modulators,

5.analyze the topologies of optical fiber networks (point-to-point, star, ring and bus),

6.calculate the balance of optical power in a fiber optic link, for any given network topology and assess its ability to operate within certain specifications. 

Module Description

Theory

1.Geometric representation and wave optics. 

2.Planar waveguides: waveguide rate, dispersion diagrams rectangular waveguides. 

3.Cylindrical waveguides, optical fibers: guided modes, linearly polarized waves, graded index fibres, propagation characteristics, dispersion phenomena. 

4.Optical sources: semiconductor Lasers, uni-junction and hetero-junction. Light – emitting diodes. 

5.Light detectors: photodiodes PIN and APD. 

6.Fiber fused bi-conical taper couplers. Fabry-Perot interferometer. 

7.Optical modulators. 

8.Optical amplifiers: SOA and EDFAs. Tuned optical filters. 

9.Drive circuits for Lasers, LEDs and photodiodes. Repeaters-regenerators. Noise in receivers. 

10.Basic fiber optic network topologies: star, double bus and folded bus. Use of optical amplifiers in point-to-point applications. 

11.Analysis of basic optical topologies in optical networks.

12.WDM systems and wavelength routing. 

13.Optical fiber testing instrumentation - OTDR. 

 

Laboratory Experiments

•Simulation of optical components (optical sources and detectors, couplers, filters) and fiber optic link topologies.

•Use of fiber optic splicer.

•Use of OTDRs for optical fiber testing. 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Student evaluation is performed in the language of instruction.

 

Final course grade = 

Lectures part grade x 60% + Laboratory part grade x 40%,

 

Lectures part grade results from:

Final written exam on all taught material. The exam includes:

•Multiple choice questions,

•Development questions,

•Problem solving involving fiber optics networks.

 

Laboratory part grade results from:

•Written test on two groups of lab experiments.

•Reports on lab experiments

•Oral grade from lab participation 

Recommended or required Bibliography

Essential reading

Lecture notes by the instructors

 

Recommended Books

1.GREEN, P., ‘Fiber optic networks’ Prentice-Hall, 1993.

2.SENIOR, J., ‘Optical fiber communications’, Prentice Hall 1992.

3.GOWAR, J., ‘Optical communication systems’, Prentice Hall 1993. 

MICROELECTRONICS-VLSI

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Face to face
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 2

Laboratory, 2 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

This is an introductory course module to VLSI technology and Integrated Circuits (ICs) aiming to: 

•familiarization of students with CMOS ICs design methodologies,

•introduction to the IC implementation technologies used in microelectronics industry,

•understanding of IC evolution through the presentation of different logic families and the influence of a variety of design and fabrication parameters to circuit performance,

•familiarization with full-custom layout design of logic gates and simple digital modules in CMOS technology using IC design CAD tools.

 

Upon successful completion of this course module students possess advanced knowledge, skills and competences in the subject of Microelectronics and VLSI that enable them to:

 

1.understand and describe by drawing diagrams the operation principles and the fabrication process steps of CMOS ICs

2.know and use CAD tools for the design and simulation of CMOS ICs in logic and physical layout levels, 

3.analyze, synthesize and design the physical layout of simple digital functional modules. 

Module Description

Lectures

•Introduction to the design and architectures of VLSI Integrated Circuits

•VLSI Design methodologies and CAD tools

•CMOS IC physical layout and fabrication process steps. 

•Analysis of the CMOS inverter circuit 

•Design of simple and complex logic gates

•Static and dynamic logic families

•Memory elements and sequential modules. (latches flip-flops)

Laboratory

Ten laboratory exercises covering all module topics using university CAD tools for design and simulation of digital CMOS ICs circuits. 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Student evaluation is performed in the language of instruction.

 

Final course grade = 

Lectures part grade x 60% + Laboratory part grade x 40%

 

The final written exam of the theoretical part of the module includes exercises and design problems of graded difficulty. The module content as well as test examples (solved and unsolved) are available to the students through the course web page. Students are allowed to bring any related book during examination.  

 

The evaluation of the laboratory part is performed through:

•Oral or written test during lab exercise implementation (40%), 

•Homework (60%) 

Recommended or required Bibliography

Essential reading

1.J.M. Rabaey, A. Chandrakasan, B. Nikolic, Digital Integrated Circuits: A Design Perspective, 2/e, Prentice Hall.

2.WESTE, N., and HARRIS D. CMOS VLSI Design: A Circuits and Systems Perspective, 4/E, Addison-Wesley, 2011

3.KYRIAKIS-BITZAROS, E. D., Design of VLSI ICs Lab Manual.

 

Recommended Books

1.S.-M. Kang, Y. Leblebici, C.W. Kim, CMOS Digital Integrated Circuits Analysis & Design, 4th Ed., McGraw-Hill

2.BERNSTEIN, K., K.M. CARRIG, et al., High-Speed CMOS Design Styles, Kluwer Academic Publishers. 

7th Semester

COMPUTER NETWORKS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Face to face 
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 3

Laboratory, 2 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The course aims to give students the necessary knowledge on data networking systems. It covers both theoretical and practical issues related to the way in which computer systems interconnect to exchange information, how they are organized within a global network, as well as architectures and protocols used for secure data exchange and use of network applications. Emphasis is given to data networks over the IP protocol and the web.

 

Upon successful completion of this course module students possess advanced knowledge, skills and competences in the subject of Computer Networks that enable them to:

 

1.Demonstrate comprehension of and explain by drawing the operation and organization of computer networks; explain the use of applications over them,

2.Know and use tools for the creation, setup and management of local area networks, computer interconnection, connection of terminals to the internet, as well as the operation of most common internet protocols,

3.Use tools to analyse and program protocol and configure networking parameters for computer terminal and networking equipment,

4.Analyze and calculate the basic communication parameters of computing systems over a local area network using internet protocols, and explain the way these systems can access the global internet,

5.Work individually or in a group of students or engineers to install, setup and maintain a computer network,

6.Analyse protocols and information exchanged over them using popular networking protocols and software. 

Module Description

Lectures:

 

Section 1. Introduction to Computer Networks, protocols and data transport

Fundamentals of computer networking and data transmission, computing interconnection architectures, protocols and open systems interconnection, network services and applications, packet networks.

Section 2. Internet organization, operation and access issues to it

Internet, principles of operation and control, its history, organization, presentation of the core network and the access network, and corresponding protocols with reference to OSI layered architecture.

Section 3. Applications, and Web services

Presentation of the application layer of Internet key applications and protocols (HTTP, FTP, SMTP, POP / IMAP), service models, P2P networks, presentation of WWW.

Section 4. Data transmission at the transport layer

Basic operating principles of the transport layer, guaranteed and reliable data transfer, TCP, UDP, sockets, flow control and congestion control.

Section 5. Routing information in packet networks and the internet

Basic principles of routing in packet networks, virtual circuits, ATM, Frame Relay, X25, shortest path routing algorithms in IP networks.

Section 6. Creating networks and subnetworks over IP

Addressing, masks, subnets, organization of terminal systems in local networks, IPv4, IPv6, NAT.

Section 7 (3 hours). Broadcast information at the datalink layer

Addressing at the datalink layer, point to point information transmission, ARP, virtual LANs.

Section 8. Data security and network attacks

Attacks on the Internet, problems and risks, countermeasures, detection and response to attacks, encryption and privacy protection systems and user authentication using techniques of public-private keys.

Section 9. Media Streaming on the web

Transmission of multimedia information over the internet, multimedia streaming, adaptive video transmission techniques.

 

Laboratory Experiments:

 

Lab section A: Basic knowledge – Introduction to protocols

Introduction to layered protocol architecture

Lab section B: Internet applications and the use of protocols in data communications

Presentation and use of Wireshark.

Lab section C: Reliable data transfer over the internet

Presentation and use of Python programming language for socket programming.

Lab section D: Addressing and routing

Presentation and use of GNS3. 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final grade = Theory part grade x 60% + Lab part grade x 40%

 

Theory Part grade: 

•Final exam (90%) 

•Class participation grade (10%)

Final exam includes development questions and computational / problem solving questions.

 

Lab part grade:

•Midterm evaluation 50%

•Final evaluation 50% 

Recommended or required Bibliography

Essential reading

1.Monteiro, J. M., Cruz, R. S., Patrikakis, C. Z., Papaoulakis, N. C., Calafate, C. T., & Nunes, M. S. (2013). Peer-to-Peer Video Streaming. In R. Farrugia, & C. Debono (Eds.), Multimedia Networking and Coding (pp. 254-313). Hershey, PA: Information Science Reference. doi:10.4018/978-1-4666-2660-7.ch010.

2.Charalampos Z. Patrikakis, Angelos- Christos Anadiotis, Penetrating with DDoS Attacks, (available online: http://pentestmag.com), PenText Magazine, vol2 no 5, Aug 2012, pp [16-22].

3.Pendegraft, N. (2003). The TCP/IP Game. In T. McGill (Ed.), Current Issues in IT Education (pp. 117-124). Hershey, PA: IRM Press. doi:10.4018/978-1-93177-753-7.ch009.

 

Recommended Books

1.James F. Kurose - Keith W. Ross, Computer Networking, 6th Edition, Addison-Wesley, 2013.

2.Tanenbaum & Wetherall, Computer Networks (5th Edition), Prentice Hall, 2010.

3.Douglas E. Comer, Computer Networks and Internets with Internet Applications, 4th  edition, Prentice Hall 

MOBILE COMMUNICATIONS & TELECOMMUNICATION NETWORKS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Face to face 
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 4

Laboratory, 2 

ECTS: 7
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

 

Upon successful completion of this course module students possess advanced knowledge, skills and competences in the subject of Mobile Communications and Telecommunication Networks that enable them to:

 

1. Describe the network architecture and the key protocols involved in the major mobile communication networks: GSM-GPRS-3G WCDMA-4G LTE, 802.11 WLAN networks. 

2. Describe and Explain the key network design and Operation-Maintenance principles of GSM-GPRS-3G WCDMA-4G LTE, 802.11 WLAN networks. 

3. Analyze basic network design & Operation-Maintenance issues that apply in GSM-GPRS-3G WCDMA-4G LTE, 802.11 WLAN networks. 

4. Develop solutions for basic design and Operation – Maintenance study cases that may apply in GSM-GPRS-3G WCDMA-4G LTE, 802.11 WLAN networks.

5. Describe the network architecture and the key protocols involved in the PSTN/ISDN Telephony networks. 

6. Describe and Explain the key network design and Operation-Maintenance principles of PSTN/ISDN Telephony networks. 

7. Analyze basic network design & Operation-Maintenance issues that apply in PSTN/ISDN Telephony networks.

8. Develop solutions for basic design and Operation – Maintenance study cases that may apply in PSTN/ISDN Telephony networks.

9. Describe the network architecture and the key protocols involved in the LAN/WAN networks. 

10. Describe and Explain the key network design and Operation-Maintenance principles of LAN / WAN networks. 

11. Analyze basic network design & Operation-Maintenance issues that apply in LAN / WAN networks.

12. Develop solutions for basic design and Operation – Maintenance study cases that may apply in LAN /WAN networks.

13. Describe and explain the network and protocol architecture of VoIP networks.

Module Description

Lectures

 

Mobile Communications module part includes: 

a)Overview of mobile radio channel characteristics, 

b)Cellular coverage principles 

c)Multiple Access Techniques 

d)GSM-GPRS-3G WCDMA Network & Protocol Architecture 

e)WLAN Network & Protocol Architecture 

f)Wireless Network trends (LTE, WMAN, WPAN).

 

Telecommunication Networks module part includes:

a)a)Telecommunication Network Principles & Terms,

b)b)Digital Telephony Networks, 

c)LAN/MAN/WAN Data Networks 

d)VoIP Networks

 

Laboratory Experiments

1.Digital Telephony: PBX Operation & Maintenance.

2.Trunk Signaling: SS7-ISUP

3.GSM Air Interface Physical Layer Measurements

4.GSM Air Interface Layer 3 (CM, MM, RRM) Signaling Sequences and Messages

5.LAN / WAN HW Infrastructure - Operation & Maintenance Tasks (Routers / Switches)

6.WLAN HW Infrastructure - Operation & Maintenance Tasks 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final grade = Theory part grade x 60% + Lab part grade x 40%

 

Theory Part grade: 

•Final exam (100%) 

Final exam includes development questions and computational / problem solving questions.

 

Lab part grade:

•Oral evaluation on lab reports

•Oral evaluation on lab participation

•Report plan prior evaluation

•Written exam on three groups of lab experiments 

Recommended or required Bibliography

Essential Reading 

1.STALLINGS, W. (2005), Wireless Communications and Networks, Pearson Education International.

2.STALLINGS, W. (2000), Data Computer Communications, Prentice Hall.

3.FREEMAN, R.L. (2005), Fundamentals of Telecommunication, John Wiley & Sons.

Recommended Reading 

1.BERTONI, H.L. (2000), Radio Propagation for Modern Wireless Systems, Prentice Hall.

2.LEE, W.C. (1998), Mobile Communications Engineering, McGraw-Hill,.

3.LEE, W.C. (1995), Mobile Cellular Telecommunications, McGraw-Hill.

4.RAPPAPORT, T., Wireless Communications, Prentice Hall.

5.SAUNDERS, S. R. (1999), Antennas and Propagation for Wireless Communication Systems, John Wiley & Sons.

6.SCHILLER, J. (2003), Mobile Communications, Addison Wesley. 

MICROWAVES

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Face to face 
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 4

Laboratory, 2 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

 

Upon successful completion of this course module students possess advanced knowledge, skills and competences in the subject of Microwaves that enable them to:

 

1.Apply and expand their knowledge of Electromagnetics in the range of microwave frequencies,

2.Understand and solve waveguide propagation equations, including rectangular, circular and other waveguide types,

3.Use the Smith Chart to solve circuit matching and design problems,

4.Use the S-matrix to describe and design microwave multi-port components,

5.Analyze and design microwave circuits,

6.Evaluate and choose among alternative design approaches to microwave circuits design,

7.Collaborate with fellow students in a team in order to achieve the aforementioned goals. 

Module Description

Basic Elements of EM Theory; Introduction to Microwaves; Passive Microwave Components; Active Microwave Components. 

 

Lectures:

Unit 1: Basic elements of Electromagnetic Theory - Time-Varying Fields and Maxwell Equations, EM Wave Equations, Uniform Plane EM Waves. (2 weeks)

Unit 2: Introduction to Microwaves - Rectangular and Cylindrical Waveguides, Transmission of H/M Waves in Waveguides. (3 weeks)

Unit 3: Passive Microwave Components – Wavemeters, Directional Coupler, Resonant Cavities, Isolators, Circulators – Planar Transmission Lines. (4 weeks)

Unit 4: Active Microwave Components - Ferrites and Devices, Microwave Vacuum Electron Devices – Klystron, Magnetron, Traveling Wave Tube - Klystron Amplifier, Parametric Amplifier, Semiconductor Microwave Diodes – Impatt, Gunn Oscillator, Varactor, PIN – Microwave Transistors, Noise in Microwave Devices. (4 weeks)

 

Laboratory Experiments:

1.Gunn Diode Oscillator

2.Klystron Reflector Tube

3.Microwave Sweep Signal Generator

4.Measurement of Microwave Passive Loads

5.Spectrum and Network Analyzer

6.Microwave Components

7.Attenuation Measurements

8.Absorption Microwave Frequency Meter 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final grade = Theory part grade x 60% + Lab part grade x 40%

 

Theory Part grade: 

•Final written exam (80%), 

•Assignments (20%)

 

Lab part grade:

•Lab report on each experiment (10%), 

•Written midterm evaluation (45%), 

•Written end term evaluation (45%) 

Recommended or required Bibliography

 

Essential reading

1.VOGLIS, E., Microwave Devices I, Syllabus Notes, (in Greek).

2.LIOLIOUSSIS, K., Microwaves, (in Greek).

3.POZAR, M. D., Microwave Technology, (translated into Greek).

4.OUZOUNOGLOU, N., Introduction to Microwaves, (in Greek).

5.CARR, J.J., Microwaves & Wireless Communications Technology, Newness Publications.

6.MARCOPOULOS, D., Microwave and Satellite Systems, (in Greek).

7.LEKATSAS, E., Introduction to Microwave Components Theory, Selloundos Publications, (in Greek).

8.COLLIN, R., Foundation for Microwave Engineering, IEEE Press.

9.POZAR, D., Microwave Engineering, Willey,

10.KRAUS, D.J., Electromagnetics with Applications, Mc. Graw-Hill.

11.HAYT, H. W. and J. BUCK, Engineering Electromagnetics, Mc. Graw-Hill. 

12.VAN DE ROER, G. T., Microwave Electronic Devices, Chapman & Hall.

13.CAPSALIS C. and P. COTTIS, Aerials for Wireless Communications, Tziolas Publications, (in Greek). 

MICROCONTROLLERS-EMBEDDED SYSTEMS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Face to face 
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 3

Laboratory, 2 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

 

Upon successful completion of this course module students possess advanced knowledge, skills and competences in the subject of Microcontrollers and Embedded Systems that enable them to:

 

1. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the fundamental principles embedded systems design, explain the process and apply it.

2. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the microcontroller technology both for hardware and software.

3. Design embedded systems based on microcontrollers. 

4. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of Hardware/Software co-design techniques for microcontroller-based embedded systems, apply techniques in design problems.

5. Program microcontrollers in C using Integrated Development Environments and using debugging techniques.

6. Know and classify microcontrollers’ peripherals; know, understand and explain low-power technology and Interrupt mechanisms. 

7. Design and implement a complete embedded system as a project. 

Module Description

Lectures

1.Introduction to Embedded Systems

2.Microcontroller architectures

3.MSP430 Instruction set, Addressing modes

4.Interrupt signals and routines

5.Interface circuits

6.Analog and Digital Peripherals programming: Digital I/Os, Timers, ADC and Communication Peripherals, Low power modes of operation

 

Laboratory Experiments

Programming of embedded systems in C using Integrated Development Environment. Programming of MSP430 microcontrollers. Development of Microcontroller Applications in practice. 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final grade = Theory part grade x 60% + Lab part grade x 40%

 

Theory Part grade: 

•Final written exam (80%), 

•Written project (optional) (20%)

or 

•Final written exam (100%) 

 

Lab part grade:

•Tests /presence (10%), 

•Written project reports (60%), 

•Written final exam (30%) 

Recommended or required Bibliography

Essential reading

 

1. J. H. DAVIES, MSP430 Microcontroller Basics, NEWNES-ELSEVIER, ISBN: 978-0-7506-8276-3

2. D. V. GADRE, Programming and Customizing the AVR Microcontroller

3. TEXAS Instruments, MSP430Family Data sheets.

4. TEXAS Instruments, MSP430Family Instruction Set Manual. 

VIDEO AND AUDIO BROADCASTING SYSTEMS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Face to face 
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 3

Laboratory, 2 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

 The objective of this course module is to provide the students the necessary knowledge on the basic function of radio and television systems. The course aims to cover theoretical and practical aspects related to the transmission, reception and playback of analog signals, the digitization of video and audio, the principles, compression standards and coding of digital video and audio signals (MPEG), the principles and standards transmission of digital television signals (DVB) and the playback of digital signals. Emphasis is given to digital broadcasting systems.

 

Upon successful completion of this course module students possess advanced knowledge, skills and competences in the subject of Video and Audio Broadcasting Systems that enable them to:

 

1.Know, understand and explain by drawing diagrams the operation and hierarchical organization of radio and television broadcasting systems,

2.Use tools to create and manage the digital content, the interface of digital subsystems, and the operation of the most widespread terrestrial and satellite transmission protocols,

3.Analyze digital terrestrial and satellite television signals and assess the impact of each parameter in playback fidelity; select optimal settings for parameters.

4.Analyze and calculate the basic characteristics of digital terrestrial and satellite broadcasting through appropriate simulation tools.

5.Work individually or as a team member in the planning, installation and maintenance of reception and playback subsystems for digital broadcasted signals.

Module Description

Lectures:

1.Introduction, subject of the Course

2.Review of basic concepts:  Historical overview of radio / TV, basic concepts / terms, the EM spectrum, modulation AM / FM, receivers AM / FM, antenna basics. Exercises

3.Analogue Radio and Television: Radio transmitter and receiver AM / FM, stereo transmission, multiplexing information (RDS / Direct Band). Production and transmission of television signals: Scan, synchronization, quality, range, standards. 

4.Analogue Television II: General transmitter & receiver diagram. Chromatography, color television standards. Exercises.

5.Digitizing video and audio signals: Video and audio material characteristics. Basic signal digitization theory. Digitizing audio signals and standards, digitization of video signals and standards. Signal impairment due to digitization. 

6.Compression of video and audio signals: Lossless compression algorithms. Compression of video signals: DCT, coding, estimation and motion compensation. Standards JPEG, MPEG1, MPEG2 - details MPEG4. Compressing audio signals: technical fields in time / frequency standards MPEG1 LI, LII, LIII. Exercises

7. Information Organization coding: MPEG1 System Layer, headings, description bitstream. MPEG2 Transport / Program flows. 

8.Cryptography and modulation: Data encryption / access under conditions architectures. FEC / Formatting: Energy Dispersal, Outer / Inner Coding. Modulation QPSK / QAM, OFDM. Guard Interval.

9.Digital terrestrial transmission and reception: Scope / Coverage terrestrial, Single Frequency Networks. Architecture of reception systems / digital TV conversion. 

10.Digital satellite transmission and reception:  Satellite positions and power, satellite tracking, footprints. Position / size satellite dish. Multiple satellite reception systems. Low Noise Block Converters (LNBs). Satellite receivers. Modulation and coding of satellite signals.

11.Digital transmission standards: Standard DVB-T, DVB-S, DVB-S2, DVB-S2. Exercises

12.Home reproduction environment: Interconnections, Topologies, signal distribution. Specifications and standards, for Home Theaters.

13.Novel technologies and applications: HDTV / ultra high definition. Evolution of STB / smart televisions. New systems architectures. Digital TV via IP. Digital television for mobile applications. 

 

Laboratory Experiments:

Lab 1-2: Reception of TV and FM radio signals / Field measurements / study of radio station broadcasting 

Lab 3: Production and processing of material / digital video editing

Lab 4: File formats, compression standards and subjective evaluation of the digital video fidelity

Lab 5: Digital video fidelity objective evaluation measures

Lab 6: Digital satellite TV and radio signals

Lab 7: Simulation of DVB-T transmission 

Lab 8: Transmission of audio / video over IP networks 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final grade = Theory part grade x 60% + Lab part grade x 40%

 

Theory Part grade: 

•Final written exam (80%), 

•Assignments or project (optional) (20%)

or 

•Final written exam (100%) 

 

Lab part grade:

•Tests /presence (10%), 

•Written project reports (60%), 

•Written final exam (30%) 

Recommended or required Bibliography

Required bibliography

1.Lecture Notes by the instructor

2.Laboratory Handbook by the instructor

3.P. Vafeiadis, Analogue-Digital Television and Video, ISBN 978 960 7559 15 9 (in greek), or

4.K. Tsamoutalos and P. Sarantis Analogue and Digital Television,  ISBN 978-960-351-948-5 (in greek)

 

Recommended Books

1.John Arnold, Michael Frater and Mark Pickering, Digital Television, Technology and Standards, Wiley, 2007

2.Herve Benoit, Digital Television, 3rd Edition: Satellite, Cable, Terrestrial, IPTV, Mobile TV in the DVB Framework, Focal Press, 2008

3.Michael Robin, Michel Poulin, Digital Television Fundamentals: Design and Installation of Video and Audio Systems, McGraw-Hill Education, 2000

4.I. Richardson, H. 264 and MPEG-4 Video Compression, Wiley, 2003

5.Lars-Ingemar Lundström, Understanding Digital Television: An Introduction to DVB Systems with Satellite, Cable, Broadband and Terrestrial TV, Elsevier/Focal Press, 2006

6.Seamus O’Leary, Understanding Digital Terrestrial Broadcasting, Artech House Boston, London, 2000 

DATA COMPRESSION AND CODING

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Face to face 
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 2

Laboratory, 2 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

 

Upon successful completion of this course module students possess advanced knowledge, skills and competences in the subject of Data Compression and Coding that enable them to:

 

1.calculate the entropy of a source 

2.design a Huffman code for the symbols of a given source

3.design a Lempel-Ziv code for a given bit stream

4.estimate the optimum quantizer

5.analyze the multimedia compression standards

6.calculate the capacity of a AWGN channel

7.analyze the linear block codes and implement error correction using syndromes

8.analyze the convolutional codes and implement error correction using the Viterbi algorithm.

Module Description

 

Lectures: 

1.Modeling of information sources

2.The source coding theorem

3.The Huffman algorithm

4.The Lempel-Ziv algorithm

5.The rate-distortion theory

6.Quantization

7.Prediction techniques

8.Transform techniques

9.Multimedia compression standards

10.Channel capacity

11.Bounds on communications

12.Linear block codes

13.Interleaving

14.Convolutional codes

 

Laboratory Experiments:

1.MATLAB overview

2.Measure of Information and source entropy

3.The Huffman algorithm

4.Scalar quantization

5.Channel capacity

6.Linear block codes

7.The Hamming code

8.Convolutional codes 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Student evaluation is performed in the language of instruction.

 

Final course grade = Lectures part grade x 60% + Laboratory part grade x 40%

 

Lectures part grade: 

•Midterm Exam (25%)

•Final written exam (75%)

Final written exam includes development questions and problem solving questions.

 

Laboratory part grade:

•Oral evaluation in the lab, on a weekly basis (10%)

•Midterm project evaluation (45%)

•End of term project evaluation (45%) 

Recommended or required Bibliography

Essential reading

1.Proakis J. and M. Salehi, Communication Systems Engineering,2nd Edition, Prentice Hall, 2002.

2.Sklar, B., Digital Communications, 2nd Edition, Prentice Hall, 2001.

 

Recommended Books

1.Haykin, S. and M. Moher, Communication Systems, 5th Edition, Wiley, 2010.

2.Sayood K., Introduction to Data Compression, 4th Edition, Morgan Kaufmann, 2012.

3.Wells R., Applied Coding and Information Theory for Engineers, Prentice Hall, 1999.

4.Lin and Costello, Error Control Coding, 2nd Edition, Prentice Hall, 2004. 

INTELLIGENT CONTROL SYSTEMS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Face to face
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 2

Laboratory, 2 

ECTS: 4
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

 

Upon successful completion of this course module students possess advanced knowledge, skills and competences in the subject of Intelligent Control Systems that enable them to:

 

1. Describe a discrete-time control system using basic block diagrams.

2. Design and construct an industrial analog controller in order to improve the characteristics of a given system.

3. Design and implement a digital controller for use in continuous or discrete-time systems.

4. Solve any combinational or sequential logic problems and implement the solution through the use of programmable logic controllers (PLCs).

5. Program logic controllers (PLC) for the implementation of solutions to given problems in continuous or discrete time systems.

6. Use a PC interface in order to monitor and control an industrial processes.

7. Design and implement intelligent building systems using the KNX platform. 

Module Description

Lectures

1.Closed loop discrete-time systems (description and stability in the Z domain).

2.State variables, controllability and observability of a system in the state space.

3.Improvement / compensation schemes and design of controllers (PID, phase-lead, phase-lag)

4.Digital controllers to analog systems.

5.Programmable logic controllers (PLC).

6.Industrial controllers.

7.Remote control technologies.

8.Digital Control Applications

a.monitoring / control of industrial processes,

b."Smart" buildings - building energy management systems - BMS ,

c.management of renewable energy sources and control of PV.

9.Fuzzy logic and fuzzy control.

10.Robust and intelligent control:

a.robotic arm motion,

b.optimization of production lines.

 

Laboratory Experiments:

Exercises in the laboratory

1.Speed control. Controller compensation with PID.

2.Position control (Parallel compensation).

3.Temperature control flowing gas. Compensation with a PID.

4.Automation with PLC S7_200.

5.Level Control with PC and the NI-9008 card.

6.Use of a Robot to select objects.

Exercises over the Internet (http://labpower.teipir.gr)

1.Speed Control.

2.Fluid level Control. 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

 

Student evaluation is performed in the language of instruction.

 

Final course grade = Lectures part grade x 60% + Laboratory part grade x 40%

 

Lectures part grade: 

•Projects (2) (20%)

•Final written exam (80%)

Final written exam includes development questions and problem solving questions.

 

Laboratory part grade:

•Evaluation on each lab experiment and report (60%)

•Evaluation on lab group projects and presentation (40%) 

Recommended or required Bibliography

Essential reading

1.Papazacharia, Ch., Solution for PLC programming and installation, Athens, Greece. 

2.Malatestas, P., Automatic Control Systems, Vol. A and B, Tziolas Eds., Thessaloniki, Greece, 2010. 

Recommended Books

1.Dorf, R.C. and Bishop, R.H., Modern Control Systems, Prentice-Hall, 2000.

2.Kailath, T., Linear System Theory, Prentice-Hall, 1980.

3.Chen, C.-T., Linear System Theory and Design, HRW, 1981.

4.Ogata, K., Modern Control Engineering, Prentice Hall Inc., New Jersey, 1997.

5.Kuo, B.C., Automatic Control Systems, Prentice-Hall Inc., New Jersey, 1995.

6.Lecture Notes by the instructor (2011). 

8th Semester

DISSERTATION

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PLACEMENT

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Recommended or required Bibliography