Course Modules

1st Semester

Design for low energy consumption and refurbishment of buildings

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Face-to-face 
Weekly Hours: Lectures: 2 Exercises:1
ECTS: 7
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

• Understanding Solar geometry

• Evaluating Shading design

• Calculating Thermal transmittance

• Calculating Thermal resistance

• Understanding Passive solar design

• Evaluating Building and city orientation

• Understanding Electromagnetic radiation and spectrum

• Calculating Building ventilation

• Calculating Energy and material properties

• Choosing Natural lighting techniques

Module Description

The course aims at providing students with the necessary knowledge and skills to design and refurbish buildings with a low energy and carbon footprint. The course is split into the following parts:

1. Explanation of climate. Description of the earth's movement and its relationship with the sun, issues of climate change, description of Greece's climate regions

2. Bioclimatic design. Issues of form and orientation of buildings and cities, internal plan organization, design principles

3. Temperature and thermal energy. Explanation of heat transfer and thermal comfort

4. Thermal behaviour of buildings. The building as a thermal system, transport of energy from opaque and transparent elements, thermal bridges, shading design, ventilation, internal thermal gains, thermal lag

4. Passive thermal design. Passive solar systems, thermal mass, air movement, evaporation, night cooling, solar protection

5. Natural lighting. The electromagnetic spectrum, daylight factor calculation, daylight zones

6. Artificial lighting. Light sources, light efficacy, lighting calculations, lighting controls

7. Scientific Research.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination: 70%

Exercises examination: 30%

Recommended or required Bibliography

TOTEE 20701-1/2010 (IN GREEK)

TOTEE 20701-2/2010 (IN GREEK)

TOTEE 20701-3/2010 (IN GREEK)

Bonarou Anna (2014). Energy Houses . Building: Thessaloniki (in Greek)

Szokolay Steven V. (2008). Introduction to architectural science. 2nd ed. Routledge: NY

DeKay Mark and Brown G. Z. (2014). Sun, wind & light, architectural design strategies. 3rd ed. Wiley:NJ

{slider Design of Steel Structures }

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Face-to-face
Weekly Hours: Lectures 3 
ECTS:  7
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Understanding the principles of design steel structures. Knowledge of the design limit states according to regulation provision: Eurocode 3. Upon completion of the course the student is able to design and contact analysis of  metal structures.

Module Description

1.Design 

2. Analysis of metal structures.

3. Ultimate limit states 

4. Serviceability limit states according to the design code: Eurocode 3. 

5. Design steel structures using analysis software.

6. Check in bending

7. Check in shear

8. Check in bending torsion buckling .

9. Review of important steel structures

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination: 70%

Exercises examination: 30%

Recommended or required Bibliography

English bibliography

 Armstrong, S. Jaspart, J.-P. Lopez, M. S. Ryan, I. Rizou, R. Brown, D. Emberey, C. and Ivanyi, M. (1999), Structural Steelwork Eurocode –Development of a Trans-national Approach, Leonardo Da Vinci Programme, cd-rom.

 Bleich, F. R. (1952), Buckling strength of metal structures, McGraw-Hill Book Company, New York.

 BS 5950 (2000), Structural use of steel building, Part 1, Code of practice for design – Rolled and welded sections, British Standards Institution, UK

 Bureau, A. Galea, Y. Jaspart, J.-P. Maquoi, R. Muzeau, J.-P. Villette, M. (1999), Proposal for a version of Eurocode 3, TC8-ECCS Meeting, Timisoara.

 Chan, S.L. and Chui, P.P.-T. (2000), Nonlinear static and cyclic analysis of steel frames with semi-rigid connections, Elsevier.

 Chen, W.F. and Kim, S.E. (1997), LRFD Steel design using advanced analysis, CRC Press, New York.

 DIN 18 800-2

 Eurocode 3 Design of steel structures Part1-1: General rules and rules for buildings,  CEN Brussels 1992, CEN Document EN 1993-1-1:1992.

 Eurocode 3 Design of steel structures Part 3: Βuildings, CEN Brussels 2001, CEN Document EN 1993-3:2001.

 Eurocode 3 Design of steel structures Part 1.1: General rules and rules for buildings, CEN Brussels 2004, CEN Document EN 1993-1-1:2004.

 Halasz, O. (2002), Stability and ductility of steel structures, Akademiai Kiado, Budapest

 L.R.F.D. (1999), Load and Resistance Factor Design Specification for structural steel buildings, American Institute of Steel Construction Inc., Chicago

 Petersen C. (1988), Stahlbau Grundlagen der Berechnung und baulichen Ausbildung von Stahlbauten, Vieweg.

 Rubin, H. und Vogel, U. (1982), Baustatik ebener Stabwerke in: Stahlbau Handbuch, Vieweg.

 Salmon, C. G. and Johnson, J. E. (1996), Steel structures: design and behavior, 4th Ed., Harper Collins College Publishers, New York.

 Segui, T. W. (1999), LRFD steel design,   2nd Ed., PWS Publishing, New York.

 Task Committee on Effective length, (1997), Effective length and notional load approaches for assessing frame stability: Implications for Amarican Steel Design, ASCE.

Articles in scientific journals

 Barreto, V. and Camotin, D. (1998), “Computer-aided design of structural steel plane frames according to Eurocode 3”, Journal of Constructional Steel Research, Vol.46, pg.367-368.

 Boissonnade N., Jaspart J.-P., Muzeau J.-P., Villette M. (2002), “Improvement of the interaction formulae for beam columns in Eurocode 3”,  Journal of Computers and Structures, Vol. 80, pg. 2375-2385.

 Byfield, M. P. and  Nethercot, D.A. (1997), “A new look at Eurocode 3”, Engineering Structures, Vol.19, pg.780-787.

 Fukumoto, Y. (1996), “New constructional steels and structural stability”, Engineering Structures, Vol.18, pg. 786-791.

 Gelder, J. and Steenhuis, M. (1998),  “A knowledge-based system approach for code-checking of steel structures according to Eurocode 3”, Journal of Computers and Structures, Vol.67, pg.347-355.

 King C. (2001), “What’s new in portal design”, New steel construction, pg.30-32.

 Linder, J. (1997), “Design of steel beams and beam columns”, Engineering Structures, Vol. 19, pg. 378-384.

 White D. and Clarke M. (1997), “Design of beam-columns in steel frames. I: philoshophies and procedures”, Journal of Structural Engineering, Vol. 123, pg. 1556-1564. 

 White D. and Clarke M. (1997), “Design of beam-columns in steel frames. II: comparison of standards”, Journal of Structural Engineering, Vol. 123, pg. 1565-1575.

Computer Programming

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures, face-to-face.
Weekly Hours: Lectures 3
ECTS: 7
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The aim of the course is to Introduce students to windows programming and visual programming language concepts, i.e., VB & VBA, and to how they can be applied to civil engineering problem solving. Students should have a basic programming background from an undergraduate course. The course focuses on windows programming methodology, on the use of objects and their properties, methods or events and the project view of an application composed of many modules/objects. The course uses the Visual Studio development environment with VB.NET and also the VBA for Excel spreadsheets. During this course students develop solutions for basic & advanced civil engineering problems in order to understand the role of computer programming in their specialization.

Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:

1. Understand issues and techniques of computer programming

2. Understand windows and visual programming methodology

3. Understand object oriented programming and efficiently use properties, events and methods

4. Analyze problems of their specialization and develop computer programs to solve them

5. Combine older/smaller applications & modules to produce more complex solutions/programs

6. Implement solutions/programs in VB/VBA using Visual Studio and Excel

Module Description

The core modules of the course include:

Introduction to computer programming and civil engineering problem solving. Windows and object oriented programming using the VISUAL STUDIO developing environment and VISUAL BASIC & .NET programming language. Introduction to VB & VBA, Preparation and use of Visual Studio development environment, Visual Basic toolboxes and controls, windows programming, Objects and object oriented programming, Object Properties, methods, and events. Forms design and event subroutines, Arithmetic and Logic expressions, Control structures (IF), Iteration Loops (For, Do), Matrix operations, intrinsic functions, graphic representation, File I/O operations, String handling, Functions and Modules, Spreadsheet development using programming tools. Macro enabled spreadsheets. Spreadsheet programming with VBA, Differences from VB, Intrinsic Excel functions and its IF structure, Excel VBA toolbox and controls, VBA Form design, Data exchange between VBA and the workbook, VBA and File I/O, Subroutines, Functions and Modules. Common dialog controls. All programming examples developed during the course focus on basic civil engineering problems and applications.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination: 70%, consisting of:

Multiple choice questionnaires and Computer program development

Exercises examination: 30%, consisting of: 

Delivery of 3 written works (3*10%) 

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.MICHAEL HALVORSON, 2016, MICROSOFT VISUAL BASIC 2013, Step by step,  KLEIDARITHMOS EDITION, ISBN: 978-960-461-667-1. (in Greek)

2.John Walkenbach, 2011, Manual of Programming Microsoft excel 2010 with VBA,  Gkiourdas editions, ISBN: 978-960-512-6278. (in Greek)

 

1.MICROSOFT VISUAL BASIC 2013, ΒΗΜΑ ΒΗΜΑ

Κωδικός Βιβλίου στον Εύδοξο: 50656353

Έκδοση: 1η/2016, Συγγραφείς: MICHAEL HALVORSON, 

ISBN: 978-960-461-667-1, 

Διαθέτης (Εκδότης): ΕΚΔΟΣΕΙΣ ΚΛΕΙΔΑΡΙΘΜΟΣ ΕΠΕ

2.Εγχειρίδιο Προγραμματισμού Microsoft Excel 2010 με VBA

Κωδικός Βιβλίου στον Εύδοξο: 12551216

Έκδοση: 1η έκδ./2011, Συγγραφείς: John Walkenbach

ISBN: 978-960-512-6278

Διαθέτης (Εκδότης): Χ. ΓΚΙΟΥΡΔΑ & ΣΙΑ ΕΕ

Computer modelling and analysis of structures

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Face-to-face
Weekly Hours: Lectures 3
ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The aim of the course is to present to the students the basic concepts of accurate modelling techniques and analysis of a structure, using state of the art computer codes (software).

Upon completion of the course, students will have:

1. In-depth knowledge and critical understanding of the modelling methods of structures.

2. Knowledge and skills in the appropriate modelling techniques. 

Specifically, students will be able to:

1. Analyse structures using appropriate and state of the art computer codes (software).

2. Appropriate model a structure.

3. Evaluate model parameters.

4. Develop personal responsibility and be capable of offering scientific opinion.

5. Manage time successfully for valid and proper response to their duties as designers. 

Module Description

1. Modelling and calculation of structures using static and dynamic analysis software.

2. 2D and 3D modelling. 

3. Modelling using linear members, 2D finite elements and 3D solid finite elements.

4. Modelling of materials and loads.

5. Modelling assumptions: advantages and disadvantages of simulation parameters. Selection of the appropriate model.

6. Modelling of members of the structure: beams, columns, plates, foundation.

7. Modelling of restrains, constrains, diaphragms, connections, releases, rigid joints.

8. Modelling of reinforced concrete structures, steel structures, masonry structures, timber structures.

9. Modelling of special structures, retaining walls, tanks, silos, basement walls.

10. Static and dynamic analysis.

11. Applications using static and dynamic analysis software.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Language of evaluation: Greek

Final written examination: 80%

Preparation for the project: 20%

Recommended or required Bibliography

1. Avramidis, I., Athanatopoulou, A. Morfidis, K., Sextos, A. (2011), Seismic design of R/C and numerical examples of analysis and design to the Eurocodes (in Greek).

2. Komodromos P. (2009), Structural Analysis : Modern Computer-Aided Methods, 2nd Edition, Athens, Greece, Papasotiriou Publications (in Greek) (ISBN 9607182448).

3. ETABS nonlinear 2015. Computers and Structures, Inc., Berkeley, California, USA.

2nd Semester

Project management

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Face-to-face  
Weekly Hours: Lectures: 2 Exersices:1 
ECTS: 7
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, students will be able: 

1.They have acquired the knowledge and the understanding of issues related to project management in general.  Be able to describe relevant concepts and to identify the causes-sources that cause problem in management of retrofitting of structures.

2.To perceive, interpret and clearly explain issues related to management of the straintheining and retrofiteed construction.

3.To understand the relationship between Project Management and Business Administration.

4.  To manage a project, such as the impact of the cost, the time limitation and quality, are treated.

5.To solve problems and decide through the study of selective projects are developed, creating a detailed plan of a hypothetical project, as evaluating advantages and disadvantages that characterizing project management’s  practices, too.

Module Description

1) The nature of the project management , relationship between works and production systems, project characteristics. Terms, concepts and terminology. 

2) Life cycle of the project approach through processes , core modules for monitoring and optimization of results

3) Determination of the Project ‘s object , analysis and organization of works,  implementation of administrative structure .

4) Identify the elements of the methodology,  by which the timing of the project is designed and optimized.

5) Special scheduling problems, administration margin activities, modeling problems in MS-Project environment or other softwares.

6) Modeling the uncertainty in the timing of the PERT method and simple simulation models.

7) Design of the Project Budget and monitoring methods and optimization of the project’s cost.

8) Methods of managing simultaneously and achieving scheduling problems.  Cost improvement of a Project Analysis under accrual Value method .

9) Resource Management, identification and modeling resources to a task/work, resource leveling methods and familiarity resource management problems in MS-Project environment.

10) Check with statistical methods,  achieving the quality

11) Risk management and uncertainty in the implementation of a project, risks associated with the timing and cost of implementation , methods of calculating the risk ‘s effect

12) Termination of a project and integration methods

13) Review of project management methods through the presentation of students’ works.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination: 70%

Exercises examination: 30% 

Recommended or required Bibliography

1. Serafim Polizos, Administration and Project Management, 2nd edition,   KRITIKI, Athens, 2011, ISBN 978-960-218-732-6 (in Greek)

2. Maylor, Harvey, Project Management, Κleidarithmos, Athens, 2005, ISBN 960-209-853-8 (in Greek)

3. Grigorios Prastakos, Management Science in Practice, Β’ edition, Stamoulis, Athens 2005, ISBN: 960-351-625-2 (in Greek)

4. Harvey Maylor, Project Management, 3rd edition, Prentice Hall, Pearson.

5. Jack R. Meredith, Samuel J. Mantel Jr., (2008) Project Management: A Managerial Approach, Wiley

6. Project Management, Body of Knowledge, PMI, 2008, Project Management Institute, USA.

7. Project Management: Processes, Methodologies, and Economics (2nd Edition), Shtub, A., Bard, J. and Globerson, S. 2004, Prentice Hall, USA.

Design of Reinforced Concrete

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures and exercises, face-to-face. 
Weekly Hours: Lectures 2 Exersices 1 
ECTS: 8
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:

1. They have acquired in-depth knowledge and critical understanding of the theory and principles of design and solution of Reinforced Concrete structures, since they could use new technologies and information systems in the design of civil Engineering structures with Reinforced concrete.

2. Be able to perceive, design and analyze Reinforced Concrete structures (Beams, Columns, Frames).

3. To have the ability to compose, solve and evaluate the internal forces (N, Q, M), the deformations, the stresses and reinforcements  in various structures made of Reinforced Concrete.

Module Description

Theory

The core modules of the course include:

1. Principles for design of Reinforced structures.

2. Constituent materials of Reinforced Concrete structures.and cooperation of them.

3. Design of orthogonal sections in bending with/without axial force. 

4. M-N interaction diagrams.  

5. Design of T-beams in bending.

6. Design of orthogonal and circular sections in bi-axial bending. 

7.Design in Shear

8. Failure and Collapse of Reinforced Concrete structures.

9. Design in Torsion. 

10. Foundation of Structures (strip footing).  

11. Foundation of Structures (Raft foundation and Piled Foundation).

12. Failure types and causes of Reinforced concrete structures.  

13. Design of Reinforced concrete structures in fire.  

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Theory:

Final Written examination: 80%, which includes: 

           -Descriptive Questions 

           -Solution of Reinforced structure

Project and Exercises exam: 20%

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.W.H. Mosley, R. Hulse and J. H. Bungey, (1996),Reinforced Concrete Design to Eurocode2.

2. Th .Georgopoulos (2015), Reinforced Concrete (in Greek).

3. Ap. Konstantinidis, (1996), Applications of Reinforced Concrete (in Greek).

4. F. K. Kong and R. H. Evans, (1975), Reinforced And Pre-stressed Concrete, London: Nelson

5. Teaching notes by C. B. Demakos (in Greek).

Life cycle analysis of materials and products

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures and exercises, face-to-face. 
Weekly Hours: Lectures:3 
ECTS: 7
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The specific course is an introduction to the life cycle assessment of products and materials. It presents the method of life cycle analysis in comparison with similar methods like ecological footprint. The focus is on technical constructions materials like metals, concrete, breaks, composite materials etc., as well in the analysis of full constructions like buildings.  As the time passes, the courses deepen in more specialized knowledge and concepts that require ability and skills development from the students, both understanding and use of new technologies.

The courses deal with the problem of solid waste integrated management as well as to the actions to manage these problems. This course is also a technological analysis on issues and problems related to environmental degradation.

The aim of the course is the understanding of the importance of the use appropriate materials and methods for the technical constructions in order to save natural resources and energy during all their stages (construction, use, end of life).

Upon completion of the course, students will  be able to: 

1. Understand the issues related to environmental degradation, nature of materials, natural resources, life cycle of materials and products . Be able to describe relevant concepts and to identify the causes-sources that cause problems from environmental and economical point of view.

2. Be able to perceive, interpret and clearly explain issues related to life cycle of materials and products, to generalize the problem, to correctly appreciate in order to make right conclusions.

3. Be able to use all the concepts related to life cycle of constructions, to provide new calculations, to be able to correctly classify the causes of the various problems and generate new knowledge, while gaining implementation experience.

4. To have the ability to analyze the problems of environmental degradation and energy consumption during all life stages of the technical works, so that they can combine, design, develop and implement both old and innovative technologies in order to tackle these problems.

5. Have a proven critical ability so they can compare and evaluate different ways of technical constructions and demolitions in relation with the environmental pollution and contamination, as well as the exploitation of materials and products at the end of life of the constructions.

6. Be able to work with their fellow students, to create and present both at individual and group level a case study from its initial stages up to the final evaluation and finally to be able to propose new ideas and solutions.

More specifically, students will be able to:

1. Search, analysis and synthesis of data and information using and applying the required technologies

2. Decision Making

3. Autonomous work

4. Respect for the natural environment

Module Description

Theory

The core modules of the course include:

1. Introduction to the environment. Environmental degradation. 

2. Pollution and contamination of atmosphere, water, soil. Green house effect,  Ozone  layer depletion, Acid rain.

3. Introduction to materials. Classification of materials. Metals and alloys, ceramics, organic polymers, composite materials.

4. Replenish and not replenish natural resources

5. Ecological footprint

6. Life cycle of materials and products.

7. Method of life cycle assessment

8. Life cycle analysis. Examples in materials and products

9. The problem of solid waste. Classification of solid waste. Constructions and demolition waste

10. Basic and integrated management of solid waste

11. Reuse and recycling of materials and products

12. Comparison in design of technical constructions, according the materials and methods used, during all stages of their life. Use of the life cycle analysis.

13. Conclusions

Assessment Methods and Criteria

 Theory:

Final Written Examination: 60%

Interim exams (advance): 40%

Recommended or required Bibliography

1. Tchobanoglous G. , Theisen H., Vigil S., 1993. Integrated Solid Waste   Management.

       McGraw-Hill

2. Stutz J.,Williams S.,Ligon P., 1998. Toward Waste Prevention Performance

      Indicators: First draft report , OECD

3.  C.Dobson, G. Gilpin     “Watersheds”      N.Y. 1999

4. A. M. Middlebrook-M. A. Tolbert    «Stratospheric Ozon Depletion» Colorado Univ. 2000 

5. Taylor, Nelson, Sofres Consulting, February 2000. "Cost-efficiency of Packaging Recovery

      System. The case of France, Germany, The Netherlands and the U.K.", Final report, 

      Commission of the European Communities 

6.Baldasano J., Soriano C.,2000. "Emissions of greenhouse gases from anaerobic digestion 

    processes: comparison with other municipal solid waste treatments", Water Science &

     Technology, v.41,N.03-2000 p. 275-281

7.City of Philadelphia,. Municipal Waste Management Plant 2000-2010, 

     Dept. of  Streets, Sanitation Division, April 2000

8. ISO 14040/2006

9 . Morris R. and al. “Product Life Cycle Assessment”,  Transylvania Univ. of Brasov,2007

10. Paralika M. and al. “Product Recycling Technologies”Transylvania Univ. of Brasov,2007

11.J. Drexhage-D. Murphy  «Sustainable Development  From Brundtland to Rio 2012”     U.N,

      N.Y. 2010 

12. Georgia Institute of Technology Dr. Charlene Bayer and al. 

        “Guide to Building Life Cycle Assesment in Practice” 

         American Institute of Architects,2010

13. U.S. Green Building Council “ Life Cycle Assessment of Building Assemblies and 

       Materials”, Pilot Credit 1,2010

14. Hsu S, L. “Life cycle assessment of materials and construction in commercial 

      Structures :Variability and limitations”., Bachelor thesis, M.I.T. 2010

15. E.P.A. “Life cycle assesement”

16. E.P.A. “Environmental Footprint Analysis”

17. Global footprint Network “ Footprint of nations” , 2011

{slider Earthquake Resistant Design of Structures }

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures face-to-face
Weekly Hours: Lectures 3 
ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The aim of the course is to present to the students fundamental concepts of current seismic codes and technical seismology as well as the technical skills for the seismic design of structures and the evaluation of their seismic response.

Upon completion of the course, students will have:

1. Basic knowledge of engineering seismology.

2. In-depth knowledge and critical understanding of the theory and principles of the dynamic response of the structures and the seismic design.

3. Knowledge and understanding of the response spectrum analysis technique.

4. Knowledge and skills in processing accelerographs and the creation of response spectra using appropriate software.

5. Knowledge and skills in the calculation and evaluation of the dynamic response of single and multi-degree of freedom systems under seismic excitations.

6. Knowledge and skills to apply performance based design.

7. Knowledge and understanding of the inelastic methods of analysis.

Specifically, students will be able to:

1. Evaluate the seismic response of single and multi-degree of freedom systems with elastic or inelastic behaviour. 

2. Deeply understand the seismic behaviour of a structure through the evaluation of important parameters of the inelastic response, as the ductility, behaviour factor and overstrength. 

3. Analyze structures with inelastic behaviour.

4. Develop personal responsibility and be capable of offering scientific opinion.

5. Manage time successfully for valid and proper response to their duties as designers.

Module Description

1. Introduction. Fundamental concepts of engineering seismology. Single-degree-of-freedom systems. Response spectrum, elastic and inelastic spectra. Effect of torsion on the seismic response.

2. Spectra, accelerographs, selection and scaling of seismic records.

3. Basic concepts of current Seismic Codes. Capacity design.

4. Performance Based Design.

5. Special subjects of earthquake resistant structures.

6. Base isolation of structures.

7. Demonstration of the dynamic response of model structures at a small shake table.

8. Elastic analysis of structures. Time history analysis.

9. Inelastic analysis. Pushover analysis. Nonlinear time history analysis.

10. Applications using nonlinear analysis software.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Language of evaluation: Greek

Final written examination: 80%

Preparation for the project: 20%

Recommended or required Bibliography

1. Karayannis, Ch., (2013), Design – Behaviour of Reinforced Concrete Structures for Seismic Actions, Thessaloniki: Sofia Publications (in Greek)..

2. Fardis M.N., E. Carvalho, A. Elnashai, E. Faccioli, P. Pinto, A. Plumier (2005), Designers’ Guide to EN 1998-1 and EN 1998-5 Eurocode 8: Design of structures for earthquake resistance. General rules, seismic actions, design rules for buildings, foundations and retaining structures. Thomas Telford, London.

3. Avramidis, I., Athanatopoulou, A. Morfidis, K., Sextos, A. (2011), Seismic design of R/C and numerical examples of analysis and design to the Eurocodes (in Greek).

4. Elnashai, A., L. Di Sarno, (2008), Fundamentals of earthquake engineering, Wiley.

5. Elghazouli, A. (Ed.). (2009). Seismic design of buildings to Eurocode 8. CRC Press. 

6. Moehle, J. (2014). Seismic Design of Reinforced Concrete Buildings. McGraw Hill Professional.

7. Sucuoglu H., Akkar S. (2014), Basic Earthquake Engineering: From Seismology to Analysis and Design, Springer. DOI 10.1007/978-3-319-01026-7.

8. Paulay, T. and Priestley, M. J. N. (1992), Seismic Design of Reinforced Concrete and Masonry Buildings, John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

9. Bachmann Hugo (1998), Earthquake Protection of Structures, Athens: Gkiourdas Publications (in Greek).

10. Kappos, A. and Penelis, G.G. (1996). Earthquake-resistant Concrete Structures, Taylor & Francis.

11. Anastasiadis, K.K. (2001), Earthquake Resistant Structures, Thessaloniki: Ziti Publications (in Greek).

12. Clough R.W. και Penzien J.  (1993), Dynamics of Structures, McGraw-Hill, New York. 2nd Edition.

13. Dowrick, D. J. (1988), Earthquake Resistant Design: For Engineers and Architects, Wiley, 2nd Edition.

14. Chopra, Α. (2011), Dynamics of Structures, Prentice-Hall International Series in Civil Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, 4th Edition.

3rd Semester

Structural Health Monitoring

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:

Lectures and exercises, face-to-face. 

Weekly Hours: Lectures 3
ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

This Unit introduces the traditional Non Destructive Investigation (NDI) methods to the student, enabling capability of assessing the capabilities and application in such technologies. The philosophy of Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) is thoroughly presented, spanning from the design stage of the structure to repair thereof.

The techniques of introducing sensor systems in the structure in order to achieve recording, analysis, detection and prognosis of the loading conditions are presented. The entirety of knowledge and information to be gathered for such systems methodology implementation is defined. A strategic optimization of structural monitoring is conducted by reassessment, investigation and servicing of systems based on smart repairs.

Upon completion of the course, students will be able to: 

1. Effortlessly utilize notions related to Structural Health Monitoring, possess the capability of properly classifying the causes of structural integrity deterioration. 

2. Exhibit comprehension of the field so as to proceed to comparison and assessment of various situations always bearing in mind the NDT and /or SHM systems application. 

3. Be able of exhibiting efficient cooperation with fellow students in order to create and present a case study from the very starting stages of synthesis to the final assessment and recommendations for further work. 

Module Description

Theory

The core modules of the course include:

1.Introduction to Structural Health Monitoring.

2. Non Destructive Testing. 

3.Advanced Sensors.

4.Structural Health Monitoring.

5.Damage Tolerance Design Philosophy.

6.Experimental control of cure for composite repair patches via advanced sensor systems. 

7.NDT Techniques showcase

8.Case study-Application of Fibre Bragg Grating sensors SHM system on Railway Bridge. 

9.Research Methods

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Theory:

Final Written Examination: 60%

Case study preparation and presentation (group project): 40%

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Konstantinos Kalkanis, George Kanterakis. Structural Health Monitoring. Athens, 2015. (IN GREEK).

2.P. Vouthounis "Strength of Materials’’ ISBN10: 9608543142. (IN GREEK).

3.An Introduction to Materials Science, Th. Kermanidis, University Editions, Patras. (IN GREEK).

4.Damage Tolerance Design Philosophy, G. Tsamasphyros & G. Kanterakis, NTUA/SAS, 2005. (IN GREEK).

Repair Strengthening and Inspection of Constuction

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Face-to-face 
Weekly Hours: Lectures 3
ECTS: 8
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The specific course is an introduction to advanced concepts of repair-strengthening and inspection on constructions, new technologies, etc. As the time passes, the courses deepen in more specialized knowledge and concepts that require ability and skills development from the students, both understanding and use of new technologies.

The courses deal with the problems (directly and indirectly) that affect the constructions under sever damages because of seismic effects, etc as well as to the actions to manage these problems. This course is also a technological analysis on methods related NDT (non destructive techniques) 

The aim of the course is the understanding of the importance of the procedure of the repairing –strengthening and inspecting the concepts of a damaged construction with classic and new technologies, and the development new techniques on the above methods 

Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:

1.They have acquired the knowledge and the understanding of issues related to repair and strength methods in general. Be able to describe relevant concepts and to identify the causes-sources that cause problem in the stability of constructions.

2.Be able to perceive, interpret and clearly explain issues related to crack problems on a constuction after an earthquake effect, to generalize the problem, to correctly appreciate in order to make right conclusions.

3.Be able to use all the concepts related to repair and strengthening methods, to provide new calculations, to be able to correctly classify the causes of the various problems and generate new knowledge, while gaining implementation experience.

4.To have the ability to analyze the problems of construction deformations and damages so that they can combine, design, develop and implement both old and innovative technologies in order to tackle these problems.

5.Be able to revise old views related to repair methods, so they can create new knowledge. Also, be able to compose and organize working groups and propose solutions.

6.Have a proven critical ability so they can compare and evaluate different statements on the quality of several strengthening methods (for example, gunite or FRP (Fibre Polymers) .

7.Be able to participate in measuring-experimental procedures especially on NDT methods. Be able to know to handle suitable measuring devices and also to be able to evaluate the measurements results in order to judge situations correctly, proposing in each case the appropriate solution.

8.Be able to work with their fellow students, to create and present both at individual and group level a case study from its initial stages up to the final evaluation and finally to be able to propose new ideas and solutions.

More specifically, students will be able to:

1.Search, analysis and synthesis of data and information using and applying the required technologies

2.Decision Making

3.Teamwork

4.Production of new research ideas

5.Respect for the natural environment

Module Description

Theory

The core  modules  of the course include:

1.1.   Beams: beams rectangular cross-sectional area, ribbed slabs   control and    dimensioning in decline and shearing to limit situation failure, reinforcement bend , beams with tall trunks, short cantilever .

  2.Columns: Square column, perpendicular column and circular cross-section columns, control and dimensioning in decline and shearing in failure, limit situation, control to confinement.

 3.Sub-poles under seismic action: uniaxial and two-uniaxial  exhaustion

 4.Walls

 5.Principles of seismic design:  equivalent static method

 6.Double-beam(of the same height) double opposed bolted frame

 7.Underground rectangular open channel  that  carries  water

 8.Boxed shaped supporting walls 

 9.Supporting walls with slant supports 

10.Box culvert rectangular cross-section

11.Computational principles for  important barrier made by non-reinforced concrete

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination: 80%

Exercises examination: 20%

Optional participation in exercises with mark of up to 30% of the total.

Recommended or required Bibliography

1. Organization of antiseismic planning and protection, (2002) ΚΑΝΕPΕ,(2012), (in Greek)

2.  Dritsos S.H. (2005), Retrofit and strengthening of structures, Patras: Self-edition, 

ISBN 9109150500 (in Greek)

3.  Spyrakos K. (2004), Strengthening of structures with seismic loadings, Athens ΤΕΕ. ISBN 9608369053 (in Greek)

4.  Rovilos Α. (2001), Μetaseismic testing of buildings – seismic pathology of buildings – guides and techniques for repairing buildings after earthquake damages, Athens: Papasotiriou, ISBN 9607510909 (in Greek)

5.  Penelis and Kappos A.I. (1999), Seismic resistant structures of concrete, Thessaloniki, Ziti edition, ISBN 9604311301(in Greek)

6.  Karantoni-Maragkou T. (1997), Design and Redesign of masonry structures Patras, Patras Univ. Edition 

7.  Triantafyllou Th., Strengthening of reinforced concrete and masonry structures with composites, Patras,  ΙSBN 9609217702 (in Greek) 

8.  Berg, Adam, C., Bank, Lawrence, C., Oliva, Michael, G., Russell, Jeffrey, S., ΄

Construction and Cost Analysis of an FRP Reinforced Concrete Bridge Deck΄΄,

Construction and Building Materials 20 (2006) 515-526

9.  Malhotra V.M., Testing Hardened Concrete: Non destructive methods, ACI

Monograph, No 9, 1976 

Seismic risk Evaluation and vulnerability of structures

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Face-to-face  
Weekly Hours: Lectures 2 Exersices 1 
ECTS: 8
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

After the course the student  will be able to:

•  Performs all the required steps for assessing the seismic risk of an area subject to specific geomorphologic and seismological features (faults, ground)

•  Evaluate and create fragility and vulnerability curves for each type of structure.

•  Using specific software to perform of seismic risk assessment and calculation of losses.

Module Description

Geometry and characteristics of faults. earthquakes fault mechanism.

Earthquake near-field motion.

Attenuation relationships of seismic ground motion.

Evaluation of seismic hazard.

Effect of soil layer.

Damage assessment methodology and seismic risk.

Methods cost valuation and human losses.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination: 80%

Exercises examination: 20%

Optional participation in exercises with mark of up to 20% of the total.

Recommended or required Bibliography

1. Β.Κ. Papazaxos, G.F. Karakaisis, P.M. Chatsidimitriou, Introduction to seismology, edition Ziti, Thessaloniki, 2005, ISBN 960-431-979-5 (in Greek)

2. ΕPΑΝΤΥΚ- TECHNICAL CHAMBER OF GREECE, Preseismic strengthening of existing structures, B’ editionof TEE,  2006, ISBN 960-8369-20-7. (in Greek)

3. Multi-hazard Loss Estimation Methodology, Earthquake Model, Hazus –MH 2.1, Technical Manual Developed by: Department of Homeland Security, Federal Emergency Management Agency, Mitigation Division, Washington, D.C.http://www.fema.gov/media-library-data/20130726-1716-25045-6422/hazus_mr4_earthquake_tech_manual.pdf 

4. Philippe Gueguen, “Seismic Vulnerability of Structures”, Wiley-ISTE , February 2013, ISBN: 978-1-84821-524-5.

Seismic Evaluation and Rehabilitation of Existing Structures

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Face-to-face 
Weekly Hours: Lectures3 
ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The aim of the course is to give the students fundamental concepts of assessment methods of existing structures and proposals for potential interventions, repairs or strengthening.

Upon completion of the course, students will have:

1.Knowledge of codes for structural interventions.

2.In-depth knowledge and critical understanding of structural performance levels.

3.Knowledge of methods for the structural assessment of existing structures.

4.Knowledge of the methodology for structural rehabilitation.

5.Knowledge and skills in the assessment of existing structures using appropriate and state of the art computer codes (software).

Specifically, students will be able to:

1.Evaluate the strength and capacity of a structure.

2.Investigate existing structures and perform analyses.

3.Deeply understand the seismic performance of a structure and evaluate its strength. 

4.Evaluate the capacity of a structure and suggest solutions for its seismic upgrade.

5.Use appropriate and state of the art computer codes (software) for the seismic assessment and rehabilitation of existing structures. 

6.Develop personal responsibility and be capable of offering scientific opinion.

7.Manage time successfully for valid and proper response to their duties as designers.

Module Description

1.History of seismic regulations. Greek Code of Structural Interventions and EC8-3.

2.Field of application of the codes. Basic assessment principles.

3.Structural performance levels.

4.Investigation of existing structures. Data Reliability Level.

5.Analysis methods: preliminary elastic analysis, elastic and inelastic analysis.

6.Pushover analysis, capacity curve, structural performance levels.

7.Performance point calculation.

8.Nonlinear time-history analysis, selection of appropriate accelerograms.

9.Application of elastic and inelastic analyses using appropriate computer codes (software).

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Language of evaluation: Greek

Final written examination: 80%

Preparation for the project: 20%

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.ΚΑΝ.ΕΠΕ. (2013). Greek Code of Structural Interventions, Earthquake Planning and Protection Organization, GG 2187/Β/05-09-2013, 1st Review.

2.EC8-3. (2005). EN 1998-3 Eurocode 8: Design of Structures for Earthquake Resistance, Part 3: Assessment and Retrofitting of Buildings.

3.ATC-40. (1996). Seismic evaluation and retrofit of concrete buildings. Applied Technology Council, Report ATC-40. Redwood City.

4.FEMA-440. (2005). Improvement of nonlinear static seismic analysis procedures. FEMA-440, Redwood City.

5.Fardis, M. N. (2009). Seismic design, assessment and retrofitting of concrete buildings: based on EN-Eurocode 8 (Vol. 8). Springer Science & Business Media.

6.Akkar, S., & Metin, A. (2007). Assessment of improved nonlinear static procedures in FEMA-440. Journal of Structural Engineering, 133(9), 1237-1246.

7.Avramidis, I., Athanatopoulou, A. Morfidis, K., Sextos, A. (2011), Seismic design of R/C and numerical examples of analysis and design to the Eurocodes (in Greek).

8.Karayannis, Ch., (2013), Design – Behaviour of Reinforced Concrete Structures for Seismic Actions, Thessaloniki: Sofia Publications (in Greek).