Course Modules

1st Semester

MODERN MEASURING TECHNIQUES AND SENSORS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Lectures
Weekly Hours:  Lectures 3
ECTS:  6.5
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, students will:

1.Know modern measuring techniques for design measuring systems and use sensors.

2.Be aware of modern techniques in the analysis of measurement results and determination of uncertainty.

3.Be familiar with the structure and operation of these systems.

4.Be aware of their selection and application areas in energy units, systems and installations, as well as their contribution to energy saving.

Module Description

1.Measuring Units Systems and standards

2.Measurement errors and statistical distributions

3.Measuring devices - Mathematical simulation models

4.Analysis and measurement uncertainty determination in accordance with GUM

5.Sensors, Categories, sensor characteristics, sensors Principles (Passive, Active)

6.Sensors Linear and angular displacement (potentiometers, Inductive sensors, magnetic sensors, Hall Effect sensors, optical sensors. Speed sensors, acceleration sensors)

7.Force Sensors (Piezoantistaseis, Piezoelectric sensors), torque sensors, pressure sensors (Categories, measuring devices)

8.Flow sensors (differential flow meter type, Flow meters ultrasonic) Level sensors

9.Temperature sensors (thermoelectric sensors, thermocouple, semiconductor temperature sensors)

10.Sensor adjustment systems (amplification, filtering, electrical isolation, excitation sources)

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Evaluation Language : Greek

 

Theory

Final Written Exams: 100%

Course Project

Final report 2 persons teams : 100%

 

The grade of the course is 

65% x Theory + 35% x Individual project

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Psomopoulos C.S., (2013), Electrical Measurements, Tsotras Publ, Athens, in Greek.

2.Mathioulakis Μ.Ε., (2004), Measurement, Measurement Quality and Uncertainty, Hellenic Labs Association, Athens, in Greek

3.Fridman A.E., (2012), The Quality of Measurements: A Metrological Reference,  Springer Science+Business Media, New York

4.Fornasini P., (2008), The Uncertainty in Physical Measurements: An Introduction to Data Analysis in the Physics Laboratory, Springer Science+Business Media, New York

5.Gertsbakh I., (2003), Measurement Theory for Engineers, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg GmbH, New York

6.Rabinovich S.G., (2013), Evaluating Measurement Accuracy: A Practical Approach, Springer Science+Business Media, New York

7.Gasteratos Α., Mouroutsos S.G., Andreadis Ι., (2013), Measuring Technology – Sensors, Tsotras Publ, Athens, in Greek

8.ΑΒΒ, (2011), Made to measure. Practical guide to electrical measurements in low voltage switchboards, ΑΒΒ, Sweden.

9.ISO, (1995), Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement. 2nd ed., Geneva

10.Webster J.G., Eren H. (2012), Measurement, Instrumentation, and Sensors Handbook, 2 edition, CRC Press, Boca Raton, USA

11.Dunn P.F., (2010), Measurement, Data Analysis, and Sensor Fundamentals for Engineering and Science, CRC Press, Boca Raton, USA

12.Fraden J., (2010), Handbook of Modern Sensors: Physics, Designs, and Applications, Springer, N. York, USA

13.Mukhopadhyay S.C., Leung H., (2010), Advances in Wireless Sensors and Sensor Networks, Springer, N. York, USA

14.Isermann R., 92011), Fault-Diagnosis Applications: Model-Based Condition Monitoring: Actuators, Drives, Machinery, Plants, Sensors, and Fault-tolerant Systems, Springer, N. York, USA.

15.Lira I., (2002), Evaluating the Measurement Uncertainty: Fundamentals and Practical Guidance, Taylor & Francis, Boca Raton, USA.

16.Gupta G.S., (2008), Smart Sensors and Sensing Technology, Springer, N. York, USA

17.Johnson C., (2000), Process Control Instrumentation Technology, Prentice-Hall Inc., N. York, USA. 

18.Internet References (updated in a year basis)

19.Lecture notes

 

ADVANCED APPLICATIONS OF POWER ELECTRONICS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Lectures
Weekly Hours:  Lectures 3
ECTS:  6.5
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, students will:

1.Know modern applications of power electronics with emphasis on their operation in industrial environments.

2.Be familiar with the structure and operation of these systems.

Be aware of their selection and application areas in energy units, systems and installations, as well as their contribution to energy saving.

Module Description

1.Compensation of reactive power using power electronic devices.

2.Control of industrial machines with power electronics devices.

3.Application of power electronics in the induction heating.

4.Electrical Power Quality in industrial environments with non-linear loads

5.Inverters and rectifying devices for wind turbines and photovoltaic systems

6.DSP Applications  & μ-controllers in power electronics.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Evaluation Language : Greek

 

Final Written Exams: 60%

Group project :40%

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Mohan N, Undeland TM (1995). Power Electronics, Converters, Applications and Design. John Wiley & Sons

2.Manias SN (2014). Power Electronics. Symeon publications, Athens.

3.Manias SN, Kaletsanos A (2001). Industrial Electronics. Εκδόσεις Symeon publications, Athens..

4.Manias SN (1997). Ανώτερα Κεφάλαια Ηλεκτρονικών Ισχύος. Papasotiriou publications, Athens

5.Malatestas PV (2011). Ηλεκτρική Κίνηση. Tziolas publications, Thessaloniki

6.Kioskeridis J (2008). Ηλεκτρονικά Ισχύος, Tziolas publications, Thessaloniki

7.Metaxas AC (1996). Foundations of Electroheat, A Unified Approach. John Wiley & Sons

8.Davies EJ (1979). Induction Heating Handbook. Mcgraw-Hill Book Company Ltd, London

9.Johns AT, Platts JR Ratcliffe G (1990). Conduction and Induction Heating. Peter Peregrinus Ltd,

10.Chapman SJ (), «Ηλεκτρικές Μηχανές AC-DC», Εκδόσεις Τζιόλα, 2003

 

ADVANCED BUILDING AUTOMATION APPLICATIONS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Lectures
Weekly Hours:  Lectures 3
ECTS:  6.5
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The course deal with new technologies in the design of smart home and building automation systems. The aim of the course is the in-depth knowledge and critical understanding of the theory and principles of the use of new technologies in the design of smart home and building automation systems.

 

Upon completion of the course, students will have:

•Knowledge and skills in modeling, simulation, optimization and design of smart home and building automation systems.

•Knowledge and synthesis skills, construction, programming, maintenance, supervision of operation, debugging and design system repair of smart home and building automation systems.

 

More specifically, the student will be able to:

•To describe and identify the parts, to choose the functions and operations of a  smart home and building automation system and draw up specifications.

•To explain the operation of a smart home and building automation system and to assess performance.

•Have a proven critical ability so they can compare and evaluate different smart home and building automation systems.

•Perceive, interpret and clearly explain issues related to smart home and building automation systems, to generalize the problem, to correctly appreciate in order to make right conclusions.

•To compose and organize new applications using a smart home and building automation system.

•Implement quality improvement techniques and support smart home and building automation systems. 

•Work with their fellow students, to create and present both at individual and group level a case study from its initial stages up to the final evaluation and finally to be able to propose new ideas and solutions.

Module Description

The core modules of the course include:

•Introduction to home & building automation

•Protocols for home & building automation

•Planning a home & building automation project

•Introduction to KNX

•System hardware and set up

•Designing an KNX installation

•Wiring up the system

•System integration and program upload

•More advanced programming and scheduling

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination: 60%

Laboratory exercise: 40%

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Touloglou S. «Structured Cabling & Smart Electrical Installations (ΕΙΒ), 2007, Editions ION (in Greek)

2.Touloglou S. «ΕΙΒ/ΚΝΧ for Electrical Installations» , 2006, Editions ION (in Greek)

3.Sarris G. «EIB/ΚΝΧ: The new Technical Building Electrical Installation in Practice using ΕΤS Professional», 2005, Editions TZIOLAS (in Greek)

4.http://www.knx.org/ 

5.http://www.abb.gr/ 

6.http://www.dupline.gr/ 

7.Lecturer Notes (in Greek)

 

MODERN ELECTROMECHANICAL MOTION SYSTEMS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Lectures, laboratories 
Weekly Hours:  Lectures 3
ECTS:  6.5
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, students will have:

1.Knowledge of the operating principles and the individual parts of which comprised a motor control system.

2.Knowledge of the electrical and the mechanical parameters of a motor control system.

3.Ability to design speed and torque controllers.

4.Knowledge of the fundamental principles of the different types of electrical machines.

5.Knowledge of cooling systems operating principles and heat pumps.

6.Knowledge of the basic motion and power transmission systems.

More specifically:

1.Be able to understand the operation and detect errors and faults in motor control system.

2.Have knowledge of the operating and safety testing of motor control system.

3.Be able to design the individual parts of a motor control system. 

4.Be able to calculate and choose the individual units of a motor control system .

Module Description

A. THEORY

The theory part of the course consists of the following modules:

1st Module:Basic principles of Physics 

2nd Module:Electromechanical energy conversion

3rd Module:Fundamental principles of motor control systems

4th Module:Direct current motors

5th Module:Control  techniques of direct current methods 

6th Module:Alternative current motors

7th Module:Control  techniques of alternative current motors

8th Module:Dynamic analysis of electrical machines

Assessment Methods and Criteria

 Written examination: 100%

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.en P (1981). Thyristor D.C. Drives. John Wiley & Sons publications, USA.

2.Shepherd W, Hulley L (1987). Power Electronics and Motor Control.  Cambridge Univ. Press. Publications, USA

3.Kusko K (1969). Solid-State D.C. Motor Drives.  M.I.T. Press publications, USA

4.Rizzoni G (2006). Electromechanics. Papazisis publications, Thessaloniki (in Greek) 

5.Hughes A (2006). Electric Motors and Drives.  Elsevier Ltd publications, USA

6.Krishnan R (2001).  Electric Motor Drives.  Prentice Hall publications USA

7.Malatestas P (2014), Electric Motion. Tziolas publicatins, Thessaloniki (in Greek)

8.Malatestas P (2012), Electric Motion Solved Problems. Tziolas publicatins, Thessaloniki (in Greek)

 

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Lectures
Weekly Hours:  Lectures 1.4
ECTS:  4
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Specifically, the programme aims – mainly through reading, understanding and analysing other people’s papers - to:

• acquire the skills associated with the critical reading and evaluation of the

educational research literature

• develop basic principles of research design and strategy, including an understanding of how to formulate researchable problems, and an appreciation of alternative approaches to research

• promote competence in understanding and applying a range of research methods and tools

• enhance capabilities for managing research.

• offer a range of theoretical frameworks that can serve as the basis of research into issues relevant to education / technology in a broad sense, and to professional educational / technology practice.

Module Description

The module is more than mere methods training; it is a broader appreciation of the nature, design and context of educational / technological research.

The module provides a focused and comprehensive programme of research training for those wanting to explore research in educational / technological contexts. It offers broadly-based training in research methods and methodologies and transferable personal and career-related skills, equipping students for their doctoral work and preparing them for professional futures within and beyond academia.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination: 70%

Project: 30%

The project is mandatory

Recommended or required Bibliography

Skittides, F. Koiliari, P. (2007) INTRODUCTION TO METHODOLOGY DEVELOPMENT RESEARCH WORK , Athens: Sygxroni Ekdotiki

2nd Semester

ENERGY EFFICIENCY OPTIMIZATION IN THE INDUSTRIAL SECTOR AND PROCEDURES

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Lectures
Weekly Hours:  Lectures 3
ECTS:  7.5
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The course has as its primary objective to provide the postgraduate student basic knowledge of technologies and methodologies applicable to industrial facilities and processes, to improve their energy efficiency.

 

Upon completion of the course, graduate students will be able to:

1.Identify key industrial processes and facilities which may be improving energy efficiency.

2.To plan energy audits and energy to analyze the operation of industrial plants and processes

3.To assess the potential for improving energy efficiency

4.To propose economically viable energy efficiency improvement application solutions to industrial facilities and processes

5.To prepare optimal design based on energy needs and local conditions

6.To evaluate the economic and energy benefits. 

Module Description

1.Energy audit in industry - General information, benefits from interventions, energy audit types, general procedure, the purpose and requirements, objectivity, tools, schedules, design criteria, preliminary energy vision, proposed project.

2.Assessment and measurements - Methodology, measuring instruments, measurement program, measurements.

3.Energy analysis and documentation - Power Balance Sheets (Sankey diagrams), chronological charts, heat balances, estimated annual energy consumption.

4.Evaluation procedures and action plan design - Evaluation criteria: energy, environmental, technical, economic, benefit-cost ratio, energy saving program design.

5.Electric systems - Power factor, power converters (inverters), efficient motors, efficient lighting, control systems, power quality, calculations, examples.

6.Heat Systems - Basic principles of combustion, thermal efficiency-improving boiler efficiency, control methodology, high efficiency boilers, hot - superheated fluid flow circuits.

7.Cooling Systems - Types of refrigeration systems: autonomous and centrally, improving the control system, alternative cooling systems, cold fluid flow facilities.

8.Co-generation of electricity and heat. Alternative fuels.

9.Saving and energy recovery in industrial processes - Control and integration of technical processes and energy management, cooling technologies, pumps and heat exchangers, Organic Rankine cycle, speed control, energy-intensive industries: ceramics, cement, iron and steel

10.Typical examples of industrial plants and processes -current state (machinery, lighting, cooling and heating, electricity, cooling, ventilation, control systems), measurements, saving and energy recovery interventions, economic evaluation of interventions.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Evaluation Language : Greek

 

Theory

Final Written Exams: 100%

Course Project

Final report 2 persons teams : 100%

The grade of the course is 

60% x Theory + 40% x Individual project 

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.ΤΟΤΕΕ-20701-1, (2010), Detailed parameters of the national standards for calculating the energy efficiency of buildings and energy performance certificates, 3rd Edition’, TCG, Athens, in Greek.

2.ΤΟΤΕΕ-20701-2, (2010), Thermophysical properties of building materials and evaluation of the thermal insulation efficiency of buildings, 1st Edition, TCG, Athens, in Greek.

3.Wulfinghoff D.R., (2000), Energy Efficiency Manual, Energy Institute Press, Wheaton Maryland, USA

4.Palm J., (2010), Energy Efficiency, InTech, Rijeka, Croatia.

5.Nagesha N., (2010), Energy -efficiency and economic performance in industries, Lambert Academic Publishing, VDM Publishing, Saarbrücken, Germany

6.ASHRAE, (2010), Green Guide (3rd edition), The Design, Construction, and Operation of Sustainable Buildings, American Society of Heating Refrigeration and Air- Conditioning Engineering, Atlanta, Georgia.

7.IEA, (2009), Energy Technology Transitions for Industry - Strategies for the Next Industrial Revolution, IEA, Paris.

8.Rajan G.G., (2003), Optimizing Energy Efficiencies in Industry, McGraw—Hill, New York

9.http://eippcb.jrc.es/reference/

10.Taylor R.P., Govindarajalu C., Levin J., Meyer A.S., Ward W.A., (2008), Financing Energy Efficiency: Lessons from Brazil, China, India and Beyond, Washington, DC: World Bank. http://elibrary.worldbank.org/doi/book/10.1596/978-0-8213-7304-0

11.Russell C., (2009), Managing Energy From the Top Down: Connecting Industrial Energy Efficiency to Business Performance, CRC Press, Boca Raton, USA

12.de Beer J., (2000), Potential for Industrial Energy-Efficiency Improvement in the Long Term (Eco-Efficiency in Industry and Science), Springer, Berlin

13.Rajan G.G., (2002), Practical Energy Efficiency Optimization, McGraw-Hill Professional, London, N. York

14.Sorrell S., O‘Malley E., Schleich J., Scott S., (2004), The Economics of Energy Efficiency Barriers to cost-effective investments, Edward Elgar Publishing, Cheltenham, UK

 

ADVANCED POWER SYSTEM ANALYSIS AND CONTROL TECHNIQUES

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures 
Weekly Hours: Lectures 3
ECTS: 7.5 
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, students will have:

1.Knowledge of the operating principles and the individual parts of which comprised  a electrical power system.

2.Knowledge of the basic components of an electrical power system.

3.Ability to design the individual components of an electrical power system.

4.Knowledge of the fundamental principles of modeling of the individual components of an electrical power system.

5.Knowledge of control and protection circuits.

6.Knowledge of the load-flow studies

7.Knowledge of symmetrical and unsymmetrical faults

More specifically:

1.Be able to understand the operation and detect errors and faults in an electrical power system.

2.Have knowledge of the operating and safety testing of an electrical power system.

3.Be able to design the individual parts of an electrical power system. 

4.Be able to calculate and choose the individual units of an electrical power system.

Module Description

A. THEORY

The theory part of the course consists of the following modules:

1st Module:Introduction-Basic principles  

2nd Module:Parameters of the transmission lines

3rd Module:Power losses computation

4th Module:Transmission transformers

5th Module:Capacitor applications in power sytem networks

6th Module:Voltage regulation and protection analysis

7th Module:Load flow analysis of radial distribution grids

8th Module:Fault  analysis 

9th Module:Active and reactive power regulation 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Evaluation Language : Greek

Final Written Exams: 100%

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Malatestas P (2015). Electric Energy Systems. Tziolas publications, Thessaloniki (in Greek)

2.Papadias B (1985). Electric Energy Systems Analysis-Vol.Ι,ΙΙ.  NTUA publications, Athens

3.Arthur R, Vittal V (2000). Power Systems Analysis. Prentice Hall publications , USA

4.Elgerd O (1983). Electric Energy Systems Theory. Mc-Graw-Hill publications, USA

5.Stevenson W (1982). Elements of Power System Analysis. Mc-Graw-Hill publications, USA

6.Anderson P, Fouad A (1977). Power System Control and Stability. Iowa State University Press publications, USA

 

BUILDING ENERGY EFFICIENCY OPTIMIZATION

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Lectures
Weekly Hours:  Lectures 3
ECTS:  7,5
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, students will be able:

¬To come into contact with the shell-building materials and their thermal characteristics 

¬To acquire basic knowledge about bioclimatic design.

¬To Be familiar with the electromechanical (E / M) of the building sector facilities.

¬To assess the potential for optimizing their energy efficiency.

¬To propose economically viable solutions for increased efficiency.

¬To prepare optimal design studies adapted to energy needs and local conditions.

¬To assess the economic and energy benefits

Module Description

1.Energy audit in building sector - General information, benefits from interventions, general procedure, the purpose and requirements tools.

2.Assessment and measurements - Methodology, Measuring instruments.

3.Building shell-thermophysical properties of building materials.

4.Basic principles of bioclimatic design.

5.Evaluation procedures and design-evaluation criteria: energy, environmental, technical, economic, benefit-cost ratio, energy saving software.

6.Electrical systems - Power factor, power converters (inverters), efficient motors, efficient lighting, control systems, power quality, calculations, examples.

7.Heating systems - Basic principles of combustion, thermal efficiency - improving boiler efficiency, high efficiency boilers, heat pumps, geothermal energy.

8.Cooling Systems - Types of refrigeration systems: autonomous and centrally, improving the control system, alternative cooling systems, cold fluid flow facilities.

9.Lighting systems --daylight utilization systems, efficient artificial lighting, automation.

10.Typical examples of building facilities - Current state (machinery, lighting, cooling and heating, electricity, cooling, ventilation, control systems), measurements, saving and energy recovery interventions, economic evaluation of interventions.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Evaluation Language : Greek

 

Final Written Exams: 60%

Group project : 40%

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Wulfinghoff DR (2000). Energy Efficiency Manual. Energy Institute Press

2.Palm J (2010). Energy Efficiency, InTech

3.Nagesha N (2011). Energy -efficiency and economic performance in industries. Lambert Academic Publishing

4.ASHRAE Green Guide (2010). The Design, Construction, and Operation of Sustainable Buildings. American Society of Heating Refrigeration and Air- Conditioning Engineering, Atlanta, Georgia

5.Recknagel – Spreoger (1980). ΘHeating and Air Conditioning. M.Giourdas publications, Athens

6.Malachias G (2001). Central heating with one-pipe system. Ion publications, 2nd editions, Athens

 

ADVANCED INDUSTRY ELECTRICAL AUTOMATION APPLICATIONS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Lectures and exercises, face-to-face
Weekly Hours:  Lectures 3
ECTS:  7.5
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The courses deal with the theory and principles of the use of new technologies in the design of industrial automation systems. The aim of the course is the in-depth knowledge and critical understanding of the theory and principles of the use of new technologies in the design of industrial automation systems.Upon completion of the course, students will have:

•Knowledge and skills in modeling, simulation, optimization and design of industrial automation systems.

•Knowledge and synthesis skills, construction, programming, maintenance, supervision of operation, debugging and design system repair of industrial automation systems.

 

More specifically, the student will be able to:

•To describe and identify the parts, to choose the functions and operations of a PLC-based industrial automation system and draw up specifications.

•To explain the operation of a smart home and building automation system and to assess performance.

•Have a proven critical ability so they can compare and evaluate different smart home and building automation systems.

•Perceive, interpret and clearly explain issues related to smart home and building automation systems, to generalize the problem, to correctly appreciate in order to make right conclusions.

•To compose and organize new applications using a smart home and building automation system.

•Implement quality improvement techniques and support smart home and building automation systems. 

•Work with their fellow students, to create and present both at individual and group level a case study from its initial stages up to the final evaluation and finally to be able to propose new ideas and solutions.

Module Description

The core modules of the course include:

 

1.Introduction to industrial automation

2.Protocols for industrial automation

3.Planning an industrial automation project

4.Introduction to PLCs

5.System hardware and set up

6.Designing an PLC-based industrial installation

7.Wiring up the system

8.System integration and program upload

9.More advanced programming and scheduling

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination: 60%

Laboratory exercise: 40%

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Papazaxarias Chr., «Solutions in the planning and installation of a P.L.C..», 2014, Editions VRETTOS (in Greek)

2.Kranas G, Daskalopoulos E. «Industrial Automations & P.L.C.», 2008, Editions ION (in Greek)

3.Beretas I. «Automation using P.L.C. », 2002, Editions TZIOLAS (in Greek)

4.Denis Collins, « P.L.C.», 1997, Editions TZIOLAS (in Greek)

5.Pantazis N. «Automation using P.L.C.», 1998, Editions STAMOULI (in Greek)

6.Robert L. McIntyre, «ΒIndustrial Motors Automations», 1993, Editions TZIOLAS (in Greek)

7.Papazaxarias Chr. “Industrial Netowotk and P.L.C. Programming”, 2014, Editions VRETTOS (in Greek)

8.Tzounidis G. «Automation Applications using P.L.C.», 2001, Editions TERTIOS (in Greek)

9.Lecturer Notes (in Greek)

 

3rd Semester

ELECTRICAL POWER DISTRIBUTION AND SMART GRIDS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Lectures
Weekly Hours:  Lectures 3
ECTS:  7.5
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, students will have:

1.Knowledge of the operating principles and the individual parts of which comprised a an electrical power distribution grid.

2.Knowledge of the basic components of an electric power distribution system and of the smart grids technologies.

3.Ability to design the individual components of a power distribution system.

4.Knowledge of the fundamental principles of modeling of the individual components of a power distribution system.

5.Knowledge of control and protection circuits.

6.Knowledge of the power-flow studies

More specifically:

1.Be able to understand the operation and detect errors and faults in an electric power distribution system.

2.Have knowledge of the operating and safety testing of an electric power distribution system.

3.Be able to design the individual parts of an electric power distribution system. 

4.Be able to calculate and choose the individual units of an electric power distribution system.

Module Description

A. THEORY

The theory part of the course consists of the following modules:

1st Module:Introduction-Basic principles  

2nd Module:Parameters of the distribution lines

3rd Module:Power losses computation

4th Module:Distribution transformers

5th Module:Capacitor applications in distribution networks

6th Module:Voltage regulation and protection analysis

7th Module:Medium voltage substations

8th Module:Load flow analysis of radial distribution grids

9th Module:Smart grids technologies 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Evaluation Language : Greek

Final Written Exams: 100%

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Weedy B (2010). Transmission and Distribution of Electric Energy. Giourdas publications, Athens (in Greek)

2.Papadopoulos M (1999). Distribution of Electric Energy. NTUA publications, Athens (in Greek)

3.Malatestas P (2015). Electric Energy Systems. Tziolas publications, Thessaloniki (in Greek)

4.Malatestas P (2014). Distribution of Electric Energy. Tziolas publications, Thessaloniki (in Greek)

5.Arthur R, Vittal V. Power System Analysis. Prentice Hall publications, USA

6.Kersting W (2012), Distribution System Modelling and Analysis. CRC Press publications, USA

7.Gonen T (2014). Electric Power Distribution System Engineering. CRC Press publications, USA

8.Pansini A (1992). Electrical Distribution Engineering. Fairmont Press publications, USA

9.Lakervi E, Holmes E (1989). Electricity Distribution Network Design. Short Run  Press Ltd publications, USA

10.Pabla A (1984).  Electric Power Distribution Systems. McGraw-Hill publications, USA

 

ENERGY INVESTMENTS EVALUATION

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Lectures
Weekly Hours:  Lectures 3
ECTS:  7.5
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, students be able to:

1. Knowledge of basic elements that concern the evaluation of investments in the sector of energy

2. Knowledge of modern methodologies and processes of evaluation in private and public investments.

3. Knowledge of  the main criteria of evaluation of investments

4.Ability to choose the proper financing indicators for the evaluation of an energy investment

5. Ability to calculate the  present value and internal degree of output measure

Module Description

The theory part of the course consists of the following modules:

1st Module:   Value of Money

2nd Module:Analysis of  Financial Flows

3rd Module:Present Value Definition 

4th Module:Internal Rate of Return 

5th Module:Payback Period

6th Module:Techniques of evaluation of investments

7th Module: financial ratios

8th Module:  Break-even point

9th Module:Profitability index

10th Module: Solvency-Leverage Ratios

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination: 80%

Group project :: 20%

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Alexandridis  Μ. 2005., «Management of Investments”, Modern Editorial Publications. (in Greek) 

2.Αravosis  Κ. 2007, «Training and Evaluation of Investment plants and Programs (from theory to practice)», Publications Economic Library,. (in Greek) 

Theofanidis S., 1985 «Handbook of Evaluation of Investment Plants», Publications Papazisi,. (in Greek) 

POWER INSTALLATIONS & EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Lectures and exercises, face-to-face.
Weekly Hours:  Lectures 3
ECTS:  7.5
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The course deals with the fundamental principles of Power Installations & Equipment maintenance methodologies.

 

Upon completion of the course, students will have:

1.Knowledge of the types of Power Installations & Equipment maintenance, e.g. routine maintenance, corrective, etc.

2.Ability to follow all safety procedures required for maintenance procedures 

 

More specifically, the student will be able to:

1.Describe the origins and evolution of modern Power Installations & Equipment Maintenance practices

2.Demonstrate an understanding of the different philosophies of Power Installations & Equipment maintenance

3.Critically evaluate the benefits of preventive maintenance

4.Demonstrate how to identify maintenance significant items

5.Describe how corrective maintenance is prioritised as part of a weekly maintenance plan

6.Explain why continuous improvement of the maintenance programme is necessary

7.Update the various aspects of a maintenance programme when improvements are made

8.Describe and calculate the various key performance indicators used to measure maintenance program inputs and outputs

Module Description

The core modules of the course include:

1.Introduction -Fundamentals of Maintenance Planning and Scheduling.

2.Maintenance Management - types of maintenance strategies (Planned and unplanned maintenance, breakdown, preventive & predictive maintenance) - Their comparison, advantages & disadvantages.

3.Maintenance Inspection and Quality Control.

4.Condition based maintenance(oil analysis, vibration, noise, IR thermography and other on line & off line techniques) 

5.Developing Maintenance Key Performance Indicators

6.Applying Reliability Based principles to Maintenance Strategy Development

7.Computerised Maintenance Management Systems

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination: 60%

Laboratory exercise: 40%

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Richard Palmer, «Maintenance Planning and Scheduling Handbook», 2013, McGraw-Hill.

2.Dixon Campbell, «Uptime: Strategies for Excellence in Maintenance Management», 2016, Productivity Pr.

3.John H. Williams, Alan Davis, Paul R. Drake, «Condition Based Maintenance», 1994, Chapman & Hall.

4.Terry Wireman, «World Class Maintenance Management», 1990, Industrial Pr.

5.R. Keith Mobley, «Introduction to Predictive Maintenance», 2002, Book News Inc.

6.Joel Levitt, «Handbook of Maintenace Management»,  2009, Industrial Pr.

7.Terry Wireman, «Computerized Maintenance Management Systems», 1994, Industrial Pr.

8.John Moubray, «Reliability Centered Maintenance», 1997, by Industrial Pr.

9.David J. Smith, Butterworth Heinemann, «Reliability, Maintainability, and Risk: Practical Methods for Engineers», 2013, Elsevier

10.Lecturer Notes (in Greek)