SCHOOL OF BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS

Modules - Department of Business and Administration

Area of Business Administration

1st Semester

ORGANISATION AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  In-Class
Weekly Hours:  Lectures - Project Work: 4
ECTS:  4
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The aim of this course is to introduce students to the philosophy and principles of Organisation and Business Administration as well as to provide them with the underlying principles and techniques of Organisation and Business Administration with emphasis on their application to organizations.

 

Upon the successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Evaluate the contribution of the Organization and Business Administration to an organisation.
  • Describe the components of the business environment.
  • Analyse the impact of the business environment on administrative management.
  • Understand what Organization and Business Administration is and the role a manager plays in an organization.
  • Recognize the importance of planning and control within an organization, and the tools required to effectively do this.
  • Develop a systematic approach to identifying business opportunities.
  • Recognize the necessary functional areas needed to run a successful business: marketing, finance/accounting, operations/productions, sales and human resources.
  • Develop the necessary skills to become a “good” communicator and “inspirational” leader.

Module Description

The course is organized around topics such as:

  • Business Categories.
  • Organizational patterns.
  • Multinational Corporations - Business Coalitions.
  • The Business Environment.
  • Concept of environment.
  • The external business environment.
  • The internal business environment.
  • The Business Social Responsibility.
  • Administration and Management.
  • The evolution of management thinking.
  • Business Objectives.
  • Management by Objectives
  • The systems theory
  • Programming.
  • The Concept Programme
  • The stages of planning
  • Basic types of programs
  • Categories programs in terms of time.
  • Decision Making
  • Types of decisions.
  • The conditions of making
  • The stages of the decision-making process.
  • Leadership and Human Capital.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Language Assessment: Greek

Final Examination (50%) (Summative Evaluation) includes: Multiple choice questions or true/false questions. Short answer questions and problems solve. The examination would take place with open books and notes.

  • Evaluation Objective: To understand the fundamentals of the course.
  • Evaluation Criteria: Comprehensiveness, accuracy, and critical evaluation.

Group Project (40%) (Summative Evaluation): Company selection and the presentation of data such as: purpose, mission, vision, internal and external environment, organizational structure.

  • Evaluation Objective: To examine students' skills and to enhance students' teamwork skills.
  • Evaluation Criteria: Functionality of the project, the degree of specifications' satisfaction, organization and management of teamwork project and presentation.

Oral Presentation (10%):

  • Evaluation Objective: The presentation of teamwork project.
  • Evaluation Criteria: The use of professional presentation software, conclusions and recommendation, the language use, correct tone, the completeness of answers to questions

Evaluation criteria are explicitly referred on the site of the course for each learning activity.

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Recommended Book :

In Greek

  • Tzortzakis K., Tzortzaki A., (2007), Business Administration - Management The New Age, Rosili Publications. (In Greek).
  • Robbins Stephen P., Decenzo David A., Coulter Mary, (2012), Business Management - Principles and Applications, Kritiki Publications. (In Greek).
  • Kefis, V. (2005), Integrated Management, 1st Edition, Kritiki Publications. (In Greek).
  • Williams K. & Johnson, B., (2005), Introduction to Management, Kritiki Publications. (In Greek).
  • Bourantas D., (2001), Management, Benos Publications. (In Greek).
  • Chitiris L. (2006), Management: Business Administration, Interbooks Publications. (In Greek).
  • Cholevas D (2004), Principles of Organization and Management, Interbooks Publications. (In Greek).
  • Prastacos, G. (2002), Management Science, Stamoulis Publications. (In Greek).

In Foreign Language

  • Michael A.,Hitt, Stewart, Black, Lyman W.,Porter  (2008), Management , Pearson Education (US)
  • Gary, Dessler (2003), Management, Pearson Education (US)
  • Stephen P., Robbins, Mary, Coulter (2007), Management, Pearson Education (US)
  • Allen I. Α., (1988), Management and Organization, McGraw - Hill, New York.
  • Bateman, T., Zeithami, C. and Snell, S., (2001), Management, McGraw-Hill Education.
  • Jones, G., (2008), Organizational Theory, Design and Change, Pearson Education.
  • Hunger, J. and Wheelen, T., (2007), Strategic Management and Business Policy, Pearson Education.
  • Friend, G. and Zehle, S., (2004), Guide to Business Planning, The Economist in association with Profile Books Ltd, U.K.

Internet resources:

  • http://www.epistimonikomarketing.gr 
  • http://www.ease.gr
  • http://www.paratiritirio.gr
  • http://www.euroinfo.gr
  • http://www.sev.org.gr
  • http://www.efqm.org
  • http://www.hba.gr
  • http://www.iobe.gr
  • http://www.ase.gr

MICROECONOMICS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  In-Class
Weekly Hours:  Lectures and Workshops-Project Work: 4
ECTS:  4
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Microeconomics is the study of economic actions of individuals and well defined groups of individuals. The theories of individual behavior, price determination, perfect competition, oligopoly, consumers' behavior are the main topics which are examined and analyzed. A mathematical background is necessary as it enlarges the economist's tools and widens the range of possible inferences from initial assumptions.

Module Description

The course is organized around topics such as:. 

- An  Introduction to Microeconomics

- Consumer behavior

- Theory of Demand and Supply

- Production and Cost

- Perfect Competition

- Imperfect Competition

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Ι. Final Examination (75%)

- Short answer questions

- Questions of solving  problems. 

Evaluation Objective: To understand the fundamentals of the course.

Evaluation Criteria: Comprehensiveness, accuracy, and critical evaluation.

ΙΙ. Individual Project (25%) (Summative Evaluation)

Recommended or required Bibliography

Books

1. Georgakopoulos Th., Benos Th.,(2007), An Introduction to Political Economy, 7th ed.,, Benos Publishers (in Greek)

2. Kiochos P., Papanikolaou G., Kiochos Ap.(2013),.Modern Microeconomic Analysis, E.Kiochos Publishers.(in Greek)

3. Besanko D., Braeutigam R.,(2009), Μicroeconomics, Gutenberg Publishers (in Greek).

4. Epthimoglou P., Modern Microeconomic Analysis.,(1997), Benos Publishers, (in Greek).

5. Hirschleifer J., Hirschleifer D.,(1998), Price Theory, 6th ed. Prentice Hall.

6. Slavin S.,(1998), Microeconomics, 5th ed., McGraw Hill

 

Internet Resources

www.ft.com

www.economist.com

www.capital.gr

ww.euro2day.gr

www.naftemporiki.gr

FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  In-Class and Lab
Weekly Hours:  Lectures and Workshops-Project Work: 5 (3+2 LAB)
ECTS:  6
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The main aim of this course is to introduce and analyze to students the principles of financial accounting, the most important financial statements, the accounting process and its use in business administration.

Upon successful completion of the course students will be able to:

  • understand the role, the importance and the contribution of Financial Accounting in the organization and management of enterprises
  • know the basic elements of Tax Code Transactions, General Accounting Plan and the International Accounting Standards
  • understand the principles of Accounting
  • understand the Accounting Records and the Financial Statements
  • handle accounting records and balance sheets and income statements
  • analyze and handle the accounts of both balance sheets and income statements

 

Module Description

  • Accounting as an information system. The use and users of accounting information
  • Accounting principles – accounting history – accounting standards.
  • Regarding Annual reports (assets, liabilities, inventories, revenues, expenses
  • Double entry system
  • Business transactions recording and posting
  • Transactions reporting and analysis
  • Balance sheet – Profit and loss statement
  • Measuring the financial results
  • Depreciation

Assessment Methods and Criteria

I. Final Examination (80%)

- Critical thinking questions

- Transactions Recording, exercises 

- Evaluation on reporting problems 

ΙΙ. Group Project / Teamwork (20%)

Recommended or required Bibliography

1. Papadeasς, P., (2011),  Financial Accounting Information, Athens (in Greek)

2. Lekarakou K., (2012), Financial Accounting Ι, Athens (in Greek)

3. Mpallas A., Hevas D., (2008), Financial Accounting, Mpenos Publishing, Athens (in Greek)

4. Needles, B.,Powers, M. Croson, S (2008), Financial and Managerial Accounting, Houghton Mifflin Co, Boston.

5. Needles, Andrson, Caldwell (1996), Principles of Accounting, Houghton Mifflin Co, Boston.

6. Meigs, W. Meigs, R. (1988), Accounting, the Bases of Business Decisions, Papazisis Publishing, Athens (in Greek)

PRIVATE LAW

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  In class
Weekly Hours:  Lectures, Tutorials and Class Discussions: 4
ECTS:  5
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of the course students will be able to:

- understand the basic principles of Private Law

- recognize the importance of the rules of Private Law regarding the protection of legal interests

- understand the obstacles and difficulties arising from the application of Private Law rules

- recognize the problems arising from the application of Private Law in trade

- analyze the basic rules that contribute to the efficiency of Public Administration

- evaluate the contribution of the rules of Private Law in everybody's life

- use and develop proposals and arguments related to the resolution of operational problems encountered while practicing Private Law

- assess the issues arising from the practical applications of Private Law

Module Description

- General Concepts of Law: Concept of law

- The law within society, ethics, etiquette

- Sources of law

- Transactions

- Deadlines

- Representation and power of attorney

- Limitation and limitation period

- Commercial transactions

- Traders

- Industrial property and competition

- Brand

- Companies

- Securities 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final Examination (80%) consisting of short-answer questions and problem solving.

Oral Presentation (20 %). Discussions with students regarding comprehension of the taught material in each lecture.

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Recommended Book and Journal Article Resources:

-Suggested main Bibliography:

• Ntanos A., Bousli E. (2009). Elements of Commercial Law. Athens: DIROS Publishing (in Greek)

• Serelea Gr. (2000). Elements of Commercial Law. Athens: Synchroni Ekdotiki Publishing (in Greek)

- Suggested Secondary Bibliography:

• Mylonopoulos, D. (2012). Elements of Law. Athens, Stamoulis Publishing SA (in Greek)

• Mylonopoulos, D. (2012). Law of Commerce, Athens, Law Library Publications (in Greek)

• Stranis, D. (2011). Urban Code and Introduction Law, Athens, Law Library Publications (in Greek)

BUSINESS MATHEMATICS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  In-Class
Weekly Hours:  Lectures, Laboratory exercises, case studies: 5
ECTS:  6
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The aim of the course is to introduce students to the basic concepts of interest and interest rate. Moreover the student will learn to apply basic rules of differential and integral calculus in financial functions. 

Upon successful completion of the course students should be able to:

• develop applications of the techniques of simple and compound interest on financial -economic transactions

• recognize the  importance of annuities and must be able to calculate the present and final value of lapsed, advanced and Enduring annuity

• use basic principles of differential and calculus in financial functions and interpret the results

• use basic principles of integral  calculus in order to solve economic problems and interpret the results

Module Description

Rate, simple interest.

Bill replacement 

Compound Interest

Annuities 

Definition derivative

Study economic functions through derivatives

Rules of integration

Usage of integrals in order to study economic problems

Assessment Methods and Criteria

I. Final Written Exam (80%) (Summative Evaluation) includes:

-Multiple choice questions or true/false questions

-Short answer questions 

Evaluation Objective: To understand the fundamentals of the course.

Evaluation Criteria: Comprehensiveness, accuracy, and critical evaluation.

 

II. Multiple Choice Test (20%) (Formative Evaluation)

Concerns issues covered by lectures. 

Evaluation Objective: Examination of students' progress in relation to learning outcomes, feedback and fine tuning of the course lectures.

Evaluation Criteria: Comprehensiveness, accuracy, and critical evaluation.

Evaluation criteria are explicitly referred on the site of the course for each learning activity.

Recommended or required Bibliography

REFERENCES

Chiang A., Wainwright K., (2005) Magraw Hill Company

Cuthbertson K. (1996) Quantitative Financial Economics stocks, bonds and foreign exchange Wiley

Hands D Wade (2004) Introductory Mathematical Economics Oxford University Press

BUSINESS ENGLISH

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  In-Class lecturing
Weekly Hours:  Lectures and Workshops-Project Work: 4 (3+1)
ECTS:  5
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The aim of this course is to provide students with essential reading and writing skills in Business English that will enable them to function effectively in a variety of academic and professional settings. 

Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to: 

• read efficiently textbooks, reference material and other sources written in English; 

• use key terms and expressions in the subject area;

• decode and reproduce academic texts from English to Greek and Greek to English;

• compose a range of business documents, such as letters, memos and reports, employing appropriate business formats;

• write academic essays, that  contain a clear thesis, unified coherent paragraphs and relevant supporting details, supported by assigned readings, with proper citation;   

• prepare and deliver multimedia business presentations. 

Module Description

Academic Readings

The 13 week syllabus includes the following specialized topics:

• Management Functions

• Management Roles

• Human Resources Management

• Motivation in the Workplace

• Marketing Strategy

• Advertising

• Business in the Global Environment

• The Role of National Culture

• Economics and the Business Environment

• The Market Mechanism

• Money and the Monetary system

• Forms and Types of Business Organizations

• Financial Management

• Planning and Control

• Sources of Capital

 

Writing Skills

• Structuring  and organizing expository texts

• Structuring an argument

• Methods of paragraph development (example, cause and effect, process analysis, comparison and contrast, classification) 

• Describing factual information presented in graphical form  

• Writing abstracts and summaries

 

Business skills practice includes:

• Letters of application for a job/course & CV writing

• Reports and letters on business situations (inquiries, offers, orders and order acknowledgements, payment and reminders, complaints, travel arrangements) 

• Questionnaires

• Business meetings

• Business negotiations

• Business presentations

Assessment Methods and Criteria

o Final Examination (80%) Questions on text comprehension, terminology, and use of English (based on the material discussed in class)

Task types: 

-Multiple choice questions or true/false questions

- Cloze test

- Short answers 

-Summary

- Translation

-Paragraph writing

o Project (20%) PowerPoint presentation and script on a topic approved by the instructor, related to economics, management , or marketing. 

Recommended or required Bibliography

• Koutsoyanni, E. (2013) Business and Money Matters in English. Athens: Synchroni Ekdotiki.

• Koutsoyanni, E. (2008) Writing Skills for Academic and Professional Purposes. Course notes.  

• Koutsoyanni, E. (2013) A Guide to English Grammar and Usage. Course notes. 

• Gore, S. (2011) English for Marketing and Advertising. Oxford university Press. [Online] 

       Available at: 

       ebookee.org/Express_Series_English_forMarketing_and Advertising_studen_121002P.html

• Selected material from various sources (textbooks, newspaper articles, journals, brochures, advertisements, etc.)  

2nd Semester

BUSINESS STATISTICS I

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  In-Class
Weekly Hours:  Lectures, Laboratory, case studies: 4
ECTS:  4
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The aim of the course is to introduce the students in basic principles of Probabilities and  descriptive statistics. 

Upon successful completion of the course students should be able to:

• calculate and interpret descriptive measures on a collected data set

• understand the basic concepts of Probability  Theory and especially the connection of Probability Theory with the statistical inference

• determine the different types of random variables in a database in order to be analyzed

• investigate the relationship between economic variables using correlation and regression techniques

• apply methods of descriptive statistics and regression analysis using statistical packages

Module Description

Definition of Probability through Laplace.

Random variables 

Discrete distributions (binomial, geometric Poisson)

Continuous distributions with emphasis on knowledge of the normal distribution and the Central Limit Theorem

Descriptive Statistics with emphasis on understanding the charts but also on the interpretation of the descriptive measures.

Correlation and linear regression between two variables. 

The study goodness  fit of the linear regression model through the study of the residuals.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

I. Final Examination (50%) (Summative Evaluation) includes:

-Multiple choice questions or true/false questions

-Short answer questions 

Evaluation Objective: To understand the fundamentals of the course.

Evaluation Criteria: Comprehensiveness, accuracy, and critical evaluation.

 

ΙI. Multiple Choice Test (10%) (Formative Evaluation)

Concerns issues covered by lectures. 

Evaluation Objective: Examination of students' progress in relation to learning outcomes, feedback and fine tuning of the course lectures.

Evaluation Criteria: Comprehensiveness, accuracy, and critical evaluation.

 

ΙII. Laboratory Exercises (40%) (Summative Evaluation): 

Concerns issues covered by laboratory lessons. 

Evaluation Objective: Examination of students' progress in relation to learning outcomes, feedback and fine tuning of the laboratory lessons.

Evaluation Criteria: Comprehensiveness, accuracy, and critical evaluation.

Evaluation criteria are explicitly referred on the site of the course for each learning activity.

Recommended or required Bibliography

• DeGroot M H, Schervish M J., (2001), Probability and Statistics, 3rd ed., Addison Wesley

• Johnson R.A:, Bhattacharyya G.K., (2001), Statistics: Principles and Methods. John Wiley and Sons

• Montgomery D C., Peck E A., Vining G. G, (2001), Introduction to Linear Regression Analysis, 3rd ed., Wiley-Interscience.

JOURNALS

• Annals of Probability

• Statistics and Probability Letters

• Journal of statistics and probabilities

• Discrete Mathematics

MACROECONOMICS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  In-Class
Weekly Hours:  Lectures and Workshops-Project Work: 4
ECTS:  5
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The aim of the course is to give the students a fairly thorough discussion of the structure of the macroeconomic system. A second objective is to provide a fairly thorough review of the empirical work that has been done to date on the various sectors of the economy. Furthermore, students are called to understand the general equilibrium theory and the Keynes’ approach to the money supply.

Upon successful completion of the course students will be able to :

- Discuss thoroughly the structure of the macroeconomic system

- Draw upon and review the empirical work that has been done to date on various sectors of the economy

- Analyze the general equilibrium theory and Keynes' approach to money supply.

Module Description

The course is organized around topics such as:

- Macroeconomic v. Microeconomic analysis

- National Product and Income

- Consumption and Saving

- Income and Employment

- Multipliers

- Investments

- Fiscal Policy and Income

- The Quantity Theory of Money

- Monetary Policy

- Inflation

Assessment Methods and Criteria

I. Final Examination (70%)

- Short answer questions

- Questions of solving  problems. 

Evaluation Objective: To understand the fundamentals of the course.

Evaluation Criteria: Comprehensiveness, accuracy, and critical evaluation.

 

ΙΙ. Individual Project (30%) (Summative Evaluation)

Recommended or required Bibliography

Books

1. Blanchard O., Μacroeconomics, 5th ed., (2012), Epikedro Publishers, (in GREEK)

2. Branson W., Μacroeconomics, Gutenberg Publishers, (in GREEK).

3. Georgakopoulos Th., Benos Th., An Introduction to Political Economy, (2007),7th ed., Benos Publishers (in GREEK).

4. Lianos Th., Benos Th., Macroeconomic Theory and Policy (1999),Benos Publishers (in GREEK).

5. Derrnburg T., McDougall D.,Macroeconomics, 5th ed., International Student Edition

Internet Resources

www.ft.com 

www.economist.com 

www.capital.gr

www.euro2day.gr 

www.naftemporiki.gr

PUBLIC LAW

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  In-Class
Weekly Hours:  Lectures and Workshops-Project Work: 5(3+2)
ECTS:  7
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The course is concerned with the whole area of public law with an emphasis on key public law rules, regulations, and procedures (including constitutional, administrative, procedural, fiscal, financial, environmental law). Knowledge of Public Law is indispensable to the operations and management of business entities.

Upon successful completion of the course students will be able to: 

 

  • record the principles, rules and organization and functioning of the state in general and the Public Administration 
  • identify and record the limits and conditions of Public Administration vis-a-vis businesses and citizens
  • identify the procedures that companies are obliged to follow vis-a-vis Public Administration 
  • distinguish and analyze the extrajudicial and judicial protection of businesses and citizens from illegal acts of the Administration
  • understand the environment upon which a firm is called to operate given that it is asked to conform to public law requirements, obligations and procedures 
  • assess the conditions set by the administration for business activity and its growth potential

 

Module Description

 Details of the concept of state 

• The state organs and their competencies 

• On Fundamental Rights 

• Basic principles of administrative law and administrative procedure 

• Administrative offices and exercise administrative responsibility 

• Administrative history: types, production and administrative procedure, temporal power, recall

• Controlling administrative operations: administrative, judicial 

• The organization of public administration 

• Selection of topics of special administrative law (especially administrative, procedural, fiscal, financial environmental law) relating to undertakings

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final Examination (50%) The final exam includes: 

multiple choice questions and sort essays

 

Individual Project (15%) and Group Project(15%)

 

Oral Presentation (20%)

Problem Solving problems and Case Study Analysis

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Recommended Book and Journal Article Resources:

Koimtzoglou, J. (2005), Elements of Public Law, Sakkoulas Athens – Thessaloniki (in Greek)

Poulis, P. (2010), Introduction to Public Law and institutions,  P.N.Sakkoulas Publications (in Greek)

Chrysanthakis, C. (2007), Lectures on Constitutional Law, Nomiki Bibliothiki (in Greek)

Chrysanthakis, C. (2006), Lectures Administrative Law, Nomiki Bibliothiki (in Greek) 

Spiliotopoulos , E. (2011), Manual Administrative Law, 1st vol., Nomiki Bibliothiki (in Greek)

Elliot, M., Thomas, R. (2011), Public Law, Oxford University Press.

Related Journals

Theory & Practice Administrative Law  - Nomiki Bibliothiki

Inspection of Public & Administrative Law 

Journal of Administrative Law  - Sakoulas Athens-Thessaloniki

Administrative Trial  -  Sakoulas Athens-Thessaloniki

{slider INTRODUCTION TO INFORMATICS AND COMPUTER PROGRAMMING  }

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  In-Class
Weekly Hours:  Lectures, Workshops and Laboratory Exercises: 4
ECTS:  4
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The aim of the course is to introduce students to the scientific field of informatics and especially to computer programming. Students will learn the fundamentals of programming through a modern high level programming language which combines features of object-oriented programming and event-driven programming in a graphical user interface. The ultimate goal is for the students to understand the way in which a program leverages the underlying computer within the framework of the management of an organization.

After completing this course, students will be able to:

•Explain the structure of a computing system 

•Explain the process of creating and executing a program in a computing system

•Create small-scale programs to solve simple practical problems 

•Distinguish the role of both the functional part of a program and the part used to interface with the user 

•Use objects of the programming language and especially those for creating the graphical user interface of the application

•Manage errors that may occur during the runtime of the application

Module Description

The course is organized around topics such as:

•Introduction to Informatics 

•The Function of Computer 

•Data Representation and Coding

•Algorithm and Program 

•Introduction to Programming Language 

•Flow Control of a Program 

•Procedures and Functions 

•Tables and Applications 

•Files and Error Management 

•Introduction to Object Oriented Programming 

•Graphical User-Interface Objects

•Design of the Application

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Ι. Final Examination (40%) (Summative Evaluation) includes:

-Multiple choice questions or true/false questions

-Short answer questions 

-Solve simple problems 

Evaluation Objective: To understand the fundamentals of the course.

Evaluation Criteria: Comprehensiveness, accuracy, and critical evaluation.

 

ΙΙ. Group Project (30%) (Summative): 

Students are asked to work in groups and develop small-scale programs in the Lab. Teacher assess the ability of students to give operational solutions.

Evaluation Objective: To examine the ability to create simple programs to solve practical problems.

Evaluation Criteria: The degree of use of the elements of the programming language, the functionality of the program, the quality of the given solution.

 

IΙΙ. Individual On-line Test (20%) (Summative): 

Students are asked to answer in 3 on-line tests with multiple choice questions at specific periods in the labs.

Evaluation Objective: The degree of comprehension of the elements of the programming language.

 

ΙV. Individual On-line Test (10%) (Formative Evaluation)

Concerns issues covered by lectures. The test is done on-line at the end of each topic through the Course Management System. Students are allowed to repeat the test more than 1 times.

Evaluation Objective: Examination of students' progress in relation to learning outcomes, feedback and fine tuning of the course lectures.

Evaluation Criteria: Comprehensiveness, accuracy, and critical evaluation.

Evaluation criteria are explicitly referred on the site of the course for each learning activity.

Recommended or required Bibliography

 

- Recommended Book and Journal Article Resources:

Books

•Halvorson Michael, (2010). Microsoft Visual Basic 2010 Step by Step, KLIDARITHMOS Publishing, Athens (in Greek)

•Deitel, Paul J., Deitel, Harvey M., (2010). Visual Basic 2010 Programming, GIOURDAS M., Publishing (in Greek)

•D. Kytagias, I. Psaromiligkos, (2004). VISUAL BASIC Από τη Θεωρία… στην Πράξη, DIROS Publishing (in Greek)

•Beekman, George, Quinn, Michael J., (2008). Introduction to Informatics, GIOURDAS M., Publishing, ISBN10: 9605125358  (in Greek)

Internet resources:

•Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 Express Edition  http://www.visualstudio.com/en-us/downloads#d-2010-express 

•MSDN Library for Visual Studio 2010 http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd831853(v=vs.100).aspx

•A Guide to Algorithm Development, Manos Karvounis, Department of Computer Science, University of Athens: http://cgi.di.uoa.gr/~ip/Odigos.pdf 

•Ancient Greek Computer's Inner Workings Deciphered, National Geographic: http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2006/11/061129-ancient-greece.html 

•How to Design Programs - An Introduction to Computing and Programming, MIT Press: http://www.htdp.org/2003-09-26/Book/ 

•MIT 6.00 Introduction to Computer Science and Programming, Fall 2008, Youtube Videos in: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k6U-i4gXkLM

Selected articles from the following journals:

•Programming and Computer Software, Springer.

•Science of Computer Programming, Elsevier.

•Information and Software Technology, Elsevier.

•IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering, IEEE Computer Society.

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION II

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  In-Class
Weekly Hours:  Lectures, Workshops: 5 (3L+2W)
ECTS:  6
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The material of the course aims at the students’ knowledge of the basic concepts of business administration and the understanding, for the part of the latter, of all these points that the director should always examine, in relation to himself, as well as to the business.

Through the course the basic principles of management, which are planning, organization, lead, and control, are presented to the students, while the need of their implementation in contemporary enterprises is also explained to them.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

•recognize those elements that lead to the development of managerial abilities

•manage issues about human resources’ mobilization and management

•manage issues about leadership and human resources’ lead

•apply methods in acquiring the necessary information

•utilize the time and organize meetings

•manage issues related to personnel’s selection and training

•manage the factor of stress

Module Description

The course is organized around topics such as:

1.Develop management skills

2.Planning

3.Organization

4.Management and mobilization of human resources

5.Lead

6.Communication 

7.Control

8.Ensure the necessary information

9.Problem solving and decision making

10.Utilization of time and meeting organization

11.Personnel’s choice and training

12.Get initiative

13.Come up with change and stress

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Ι. Final Examination (60%), which includes:

-Multiple choice questions 

-Topics for elaboration

ΙΙ. Individual Project (40%)

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Recommended Book Resources:

•Alexander Hamilton Institute. (2011). “Current Management in Practice”, Kriterion Publishing, Athens. (in Greek)

•Kakouris, Α.  (2013). “Management of Operational Functions”, Propobos Publishing, Athens. (in Greek)

•Chytiris, L. (2006). “Business Administration Principles”, Interbooks Publishing, Athens. (in Greek)

FINANCIAL STATEMENT ANALYSIS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  In-Class
Weekly Hours:  Lectures and Workshops-Project Work: 4
ECTS:  4
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The analysis and the interpretation of the accounting information which is included in financial statements is the main purpose of this course. In particular, cash flow, profitability, effectiveness, capital structure, liquidity, evidence for financial distress of firms.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

•Understand and manage the content of financial statements

•Analyze accounting information using ratios

•Use financial methods for the prediction of financial distress

•Develop financial statements

•Evaluate the credit worthiness of firms processing accounting data

•Analyze firm’s cash flow

Module Description

The course is organized around topics such as:

-Demand for accounting information which is reported in financial statements

-Interpretation of the financial reporting information

-Annual and interim reports

-Cash flow analysis

-Evaluation of liquidity, capital structure, solvency, profitability and efficiency

-Bankruptcy, Altman and Olson models

-Capital markets and accounting information

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Ι. Final Examination (80%)

  - Short answer questions

  - Critical thinking questions

  - Exercises on business performance analysis

  - Case study. 

ΙΙ. Group Project (20%)

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Recommended Book and Journal Article Resources

1.KANTZOS, K., 2002. Financial Statements Analysis. Athens: Interbooks Publishing. (in Greek)

2.NIARCHOS N., 1997. Financial Statements Analysis. Athens: Stamoulis Publishing. (in Greek) 

3.PALEPU K., HEALY P., BERNARD V., 2004. Business Analysis and Valuation using Financial Statements. Ohio: Thomson – South Western Publishing. 

4.PENMAN S., 2010. Financial Statement Analysis and Security Valuation. New York: McGraw Hill Publishing.

3rd Semester

PRINCIPLES OF FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  In-Class
Weekly Hours:  Lectures and Workshops-Project Work: 5
ECTS:  6
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The aim of the course is to introduce students to the theory and practice of Finance. It also aims to provide the key elements needed by business management, accounting and other groups of undergraduate and practising managers. Finance theory and practice are integrated throughout the course, reflecting the extent to which real world practice has been profoundly shaped by theoretical developments. 

Upon successful completion of the course the student / her will be able to:

•Develop analytical thinking and combine the  involved factors so as to be  able to make the right decisions in a short time 

•make decisions so  as to   ensure maximization of the economic result of the firms

•Understand the procedures for the assessment of the optimal decisions from the financial point of view.

•Use the financial analysis methods and techniques in cases of financial decision making. 

Module Description

The course is organized around topics such as:

- Introduction to Financial Analysis

- Funds Needed

- Management of Working Capital

- Financial Statement Analysis

- Short term financial policy

- Analysis of the degree of Leverage

- An Introduction to Investment Appraisal Techniques

- Venture Capital

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final  Examination (60%)

- Short answer questions

- Questions of solving  problems. 

Evaluation Objective: To understand the fundamentals of the course.

Evaluation Criteria: Comprehensiveness, accuracy, and critical evaluation.

 

ΙΙ. Individual  Project (40%) (Summative Evaluation): 

Evaluation Objective: To examine students' skills in internet tools and services and to enhance students' teamwork skills.

Evaluation Criteria: Functionality of the application, the degree of specifications' satisfaction, user-interface, organization and management of teamwork project and presentation.

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Recommended Book and Journal Article Resources:

Books

1. Apostolopoulos J., (2004), Special issues on Financial Management, Stamoulis   Publishers (in Greek).

2. Vasileiou D., Iriotis N. (2008), Financial Management: Theory and Practice,  Rossili Publishers (in Greek).

3.Karathanasi G., Drakou An. (2010), Financial Management, Benou Publishers (in Greek)

4. Kiohos P. and A. Kiohos (2003), Portfogio Management of Financial Risks,  Sychroni Ekdotiki Publishers ( in Greek)

5.Weston & Brigham (1986), Principles in Financial Management and Policy,   Papazisi Publishers (in Greek).

6.Arnold, G., Corporate Financial Management (2005), 3rd ed. Prentice Hall 2005

7.Brealey,R. & Myers S and Allen,F Principles of Corporate Finance, 9th ed.,   McGraw Hill

8.Brigham E., Ehrhardt, M. (2005), Financial Management: Theory and Practice, 11th ed., Thomson South-Western 

9. Lumby S. (1999), Investment Appraisal and Financing Decisions,  Thomson Learning.

ORGANISATIONAL BEHAVIOUR

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  FACE TO FACE
Weekly Hours:  Lectures: 3, Exercise of practice: 2
ECTS:  5
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The effective managers and professionals, in every sector, have to acquire the demanded skills at the art of “reading” the cases in which they attempt to organize or manage. These skills, usually, take the form of an intuitive process, which is a product of learning, to which both person’s experiences and natural abilities contribute. We are based on a simple acceptance: theories on organization and administration are based on implicit images or metaphors which help us see, understand and administer the organizations in particular but not complete ways. The use of a metaphor indicates a way of thinking and a way of viewing which penetrate the way in which we generally percept the world. For example, the research in a large variety of scientific levels has shown that metaphors influence decisively not only the way we express ourselves in everyday life but also science, our language and they way we think. If we realize that theory is a metaphorical description, we will immediately estimate that no single theory will ever give us the perfect perception of things or a perception which will serve every cause.  The challenge consists in acquiring skills in the art of using metaphorical descriptions: finding new ways of viewing, understanding and shaping cases, which we want to organize and manage. The Autopoiesis theory (Biology), The Systemic theory, the theory of Chaos and Complexity (Physics) and Psychoanalysis are highly essential for understanding organizations. 

 

 Upon successful completion of the course students should be able to:

oDescribe real problems of human resources management and define the most suitable methodological approach and steps for solving the problem (methodological approaches, analysis of the complexity, finding satisfying routes, tools utilization, implementation of change).

oDescribe the way in which they will take advantage of the problem’s data processing results and support- by using arguments- the decision making.

oBe able to develop the experience or knowledge of previous cases, which are related to the particular examined problem and use them by adaapting them in the new conditions.

oAnalyze the organizational problems and catalytically support the acceleration of organisational processes of change.

oBe able to create the frame in which individuals develop their creativity and undertake initiatives.

oUse the suitable methodological tools to support Management and Human Resources Development

oAnalyze the data and use the results of and recommend  the routes for solving problems harmonised to the strategic choices. 

oTake advantages of the feedbacks by creating alternative scripts of avoiding resistances and dead end points.

oAssess the results of processing and reconsider their  model in the dynamic business environment.

Module Description

•Introductory concepts of Organizational Change- Organizational theory

oMachines, mechanical thought and bureaucratic organization

oOrigins of mechanistic organization

oClassic theory of management & planning of bureaucratic organizations

oScientific management

oAdvantages and restrictions of mechanistic view

oApplications- Case studies

 

•Organizations under the light of Biology

oOrganizational needs

oThe meaning of environment: Open systems

oContingency theory: The adjustment of organization in the environment

oThe variety of species

oAdvancing health and organization development

oView of organizations from the aspect of population ecology

oOrganizational ecology: the creation of a common future

oAdvantages and restrictions of Organismic view

oApplications- Case studies

 

•Learning and self- organized Organizations: The brain organizations

oBrain images

oOrganizations as brains of processing information

oCreating Learner organizations

oCybernetics, learning and studying to learn

oDirections for the creation of “learning organizations”

oOrganizations as holographic brains

oPrinciples of holographic planning

oAdvantages and restrictions of brain view

oApplications- Case studies

 

•Organizations as cultures

oOrganization and cultural frame

oCompany culture and subcultures

oAdvantages and restrictions of cultural metaphor

oApplications- Case studies

 

•Interests, Conflicts and Power

oOrganizations as governing systems

oOrganizations as systems of political activity

oManaging pluralistic organizations 

oAdvantages and restrictions of political metaphor

oApplications- Case studies

 

•The challenge of metaphorical descriptions

oMetaphorical descriptions create ways of viewing and forming organizational life

oNew ways of viewing, thinking and taking action

oApplications- Case studies

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Theoretical part:

Ι. Final examination (60%) which includes:

- Multiple choice questions

-Questions on the theoretical part of the course

-Case studies regarding problems’ solution with taught methods

 

 ΙI. Individual Project (40%) which contains:

-Short case studies related to matters of management and human resources development in which will be assessed the degree that students are able:

to analyze data and the conditions of the case study,

to modelize problems with the most suitable method,

to define solutions and analyze the results.

Recommended or required Bibliography

- RECOMMENDED BOOKS

•Kyriazopoulos P and E. Samanta (2014), Introduction to Organisational Behavior, Synchroni Ekdotiki Publishers (in Greek)

•Zavlanos M. (2002), Organisational Behavior, Stamoulis Publishers (In Greek)

•Senge, P.M. (1990), The Fifth Discipline-The Arts and practice of the Learning organization, New York, Currency Doubleday

•Senge, P.M. (1994), The fifth discipline-fieldbook, London:Nicolas Brealey

•John Kotter (2001), Ηγέτες στις Αλλαγές (2001), Εκδόσεις Κριτική

•Gareth Morgan (1997), Images of organization

•Jeffrey Goldstein (1994), The Unshackled Organization: Facing the challenge of unpredictability through spontaneous reorganization

-RELATED SCIENTIFIC JOURNALS

•European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier

•Academy of Management

•Journal of Management Studies

•Journal of Organizational change management

PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  In-Class
Weekly Hours:  Lectures and Workshops-Project Work: 5
ECTS:  6
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Purpose of the course is to introduce students to the philosophy, basic concepts, principles and procedures that pertain to the marketing function.  Students will be exposed to various forms of marketing and  the role of marketing in organizations . Emphasis will be placed on the four elements of the marketing mix (product, price, place, promotion) and the formulation of a marketing plan for a product and/or service. 

Upon successful completion of this course  the student will be able to:

•Recognize the basic functions of marketing and the input of the marketing unit in the management of the organization 

•Categorize customers into various groups according to various methods of segmentation 

•Develop the appropriate strategies of STP (segmenting-targeting-positioning) for specific products and services   

•Design  effectively the marketing mix of a product/service

Module Description

The course is organized around topics such as:

-Philosophy and context of Marketing

-Types of Marketing   

-Consumer Behavior  

-Marketing Research 

-Segmentation-Targeting-Positioning 

-Marketing Mix (4 Ps) 

-Differentiation strategies for products and services 

-Formulation of Marketing Plan 

-Case studies

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Ι. Final Examination (70%) (Summative Evaluation) includes:

-Multiple choice questions and/or true-false questions

-Short answer questions

Evaluation Objective: To understand the fundamentals of the course.

Evaluation Criteria: Comprehensiveness, accuracy, and critical evaluation.

 

ΙΙ. Group Project (30%) (Summative Evaluation) includes: 

-  written work 

- public presentation  

Analysis of case study

Evaluation Objective: To examine students' skills and to enhance students' teamwork skills.

Evaluation Criteria: Degree of specifications' satisfaction, Categorization-organization-adaptation of material, structure and clarity of written text, organization and management of teamwork project and presentation.

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Recommended Book and Journal Article Resources:

Books:

•Kyriazopoulos P., Samanta E., (2014). Introduction to Marketing: Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow, Sychroni Ekdotiki Publishing, Athens (in Greek). 

•Fahy J, Jobber D (2014). Principles of Marketing, Kritiki Publishers, Athens (in Greek)

• Armstrong, G. &. Kotler, P. J., (2009), Marketing: An Introduction to Marketing  (9η ed.,) Pearson Edition

•Panigyrakis G., Siomkos G (2005). Marketing Case Studies. Stamoulis, Athens (in Greek) 

•Tzortzakis K & Tzortzakis A (2002). Principles of Marketing, Rosili, Athens (in Greek). 

 

Selected articles from Journals:

Scientific Marketing (in Greek)  

Business Horizons 

Journal of Marketing 

Journal of European Marketing

Journal of Marketing Management 

Harvard Business Review  

Marketing Intelligence & Planning

BUSINESS STATISTICS II

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  In-Class
Weekly Hours:  Lectures Laboratory and case studies: 5
ECTS:  6
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The aim of the course  is to introduce students to the basic concepts of statistical inference and to familiarize students with the usage of statistical packages . 

After the successful completion of this course the students will be able to:

• Understand the basic concepts of Estimation (with applications primarily in the confidence intervals)

• Apply statistical tests of mean values and rates for one and two samples and interpret the results

• Apply the statistical test chi square and interpret the results

•Develop  basic concepts of quality control charts

•Evaluate different statistical methods on data analysis problems

•For the above must be familiar with appropriate software via the laboratory part of the course

Module Description

Estimability-Confidence Intervals

Statistical tests of mean values 

Statistical tests of percentages

Chi square test

Forecasting

Quality control in order to  check on industrial production before it reaches the consumer.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Ι. Final Examination (50%) (Summative Evaluation) includes:

-Multiple choice questions or true/false questions

-Short answer questions 

Evaluation Objective: To understand the fundamentals of the course.

Evaluation Criteria: Comprehensiveness, accuracy, and critical evaluation.

 

ΙI. Multiple Choice Tests (10%) (Formative Evaluation)

Concerns issues covered by lectures. 

Evaluation Objective: Examination of students' progress in relation to learning outcomes, feedback and fine tuning of the course lectures.

Evaluation Criteria: Comprehensiveness, accuracy, and critical evaluation.

 

ΙΙΙ.Individual project ( Laboratory) (40%)(Summative Evaluation): 

Concerns issues covered by laboratory lessons. 

Evaluation Objective: Examination of students' progress in relation to learning outcomes, feedback and fine tuning of the laboratory lessons.

Evaluation Criteria: Comprehensiveness, accuracy, and critical evaluation.

 

Evaluation criteria are explicitly referred on the site of the course for each learning activity.

Recommended or required Bibliography

Books

Bickel P.J., Doksum K. A., Mathematical Statistics, Volume 1, Basic Ideas and Selected Topics, 2rd ed. Prentice Hall, 2001 

Casella G., Berger R. L., (2001) Statistical Inference, 2nd ed., Duxbury Press,. 

Hogg R. V., Craig A T., McKean J W., (2004) An Introduction to Mathematical Statistics, 6th ed., Prentice Hall.

Landow, S. and Everitt, B.  (2004) A Handbook of Statistical Analyses Using SPSS, Chapman and Hall/CRC Press Company, New York, Washington.

Montgomery D C., Peck E A., Vining G. G, (2001) Introduction to Linear Regression Analysis, 3rd ed., Wiley-Interscience.

Mood A. M.,  Graybill F. A.,  Boes D. C.  (2002) Introduction to the Theory of Statistics. McGraw-Hill Series in Probability and Statistics. McGraw-Hill.

 

JOURNALS

Annals of Statistics

Statistics and Probability Letters

Journal of statistical planning and inference

Journal of statistics and probabilities

Journal of business statistics and economics

Journal of business and economic statistics

OPERATIONAL RESEARCH

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  In-Class
Weekly Hours:  Lectures, Workshops and Laboratory Exercises: 5
ECTS:  6
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The Operations Research is an essential tool of management for solving executive and operational decision problems throughout the functionality of enterprises and organizations (production, marketing, services, financial management, etc.). The course provides the fundamental knowledge and main areas of Operational Research and the description of methods and applications that cover all the range of functions of enterprises and organisations.

After completing this course the student should be able to:

•Describe real world decision problems and identify the steps to solve them (problem formulation, modeling, methodological approaches and algorithms, exploitation of the results , implementation of the decision).

•Describe how can be used the results of the analyses.

•Identify previous cases which are relevant and can help to solve the problem.

•Analyze decision problems and construct mathematical models describing them, taking into account all the parameters and restrictions governing the decision problem .

•Select and apply the appropriate methodological approach  for solving decision problems.

•Use appropriate mathematical software and develop applications to solve problems.

•Analyze the results and propose a solution or solutions (decisions) and argue for the choice of the proposed decision.

 

Module Description

•Introduction to Operational Research

•Linear ProgrammingΓραμμικός προγραμματισμός,

oDescription and Problem Formulation,

oGraphical Solution of Linear Programme for two variables

oSIMPLEX method

oSensitivity Analysis

oEconomical Interpretation of the results

oUse SIMPEX method for minimisation problems

oCase Studies, Exercises

•Integer Programming and Applications

•Branch and Bound algorithm

•Integer Programming  0/1 and Applications

•Dynamic Programming and Applications

oBellman Theorem

oRecursive Functions

oBackwoard Method

oForewoard Method

oApplications and case studies

 

•Multicriteria Decision Aid Analysis

oFundamentals of Multicriteria Decision Aid Analysis

oCriteria Modelling

oDecision Problems with Discrete Alternative actions

oAlternative actions' evaluation on the criteria

oThe Analytical Hierarchical Method

oMethods of Disaggregation - Aggregation Approach

oApplications and case Studies

 

The practical part  of the  course includes the teaching of real world application and the development of applications with specific software (MS EXCEL/SOLVER, LINDO, MATLAB, ENVI)

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Theoretical Part (60%)

Ι. Final Examination (60%) (Summative Evaluation) includes:

-     Multiple choice questions 

-     Short answer questions

-     Problems solutions with the taught methods

ΙΙ. Group Project (30%) (Summative Evaluation): 

Evaluation Criteria: 

•Completeness - 35%

•Clearness - 25%

•Documentation - 30%

•Critical Evaluation- 10%

ΙII. Individual Oral Presentation  (10%) 

(Formative Evaluation): Oral individual presentation at the laboratory

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Recommended Book and Journal Article Resources:

•Moschona Th. , Chaalikias Μ., Chelidonis G. (2010). Operational Research, Sychroni Ekdotiki Publishers (in Greek)

•Ipsilantis P.  (2010) Operational Research, Propompos Publishers (in Greek)

•Albright, S.C. and Winston, W.L. (2005). Spreadsheet Modeling and Applications: Essentials of Practical Management Science, Thomson Brooks/Cole .

•Anderson, D.R., Sweeney, D.J., Williams, T.A., Camm, J.D. and Martin, K. (2010). An Introduction to Management Science, Quantitative Approaches to Decision Making, 10th ed., Delmar Cengage Learning.

•Siskos, Ι. (1999), Linear Programming, New Technology Publisshers (in Greek).

-Recommended Journals:

•European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier

•Operational Research: An International Journal, Springer

•Annals of Operations Research, Springer

4th Semester

MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS (MIS)

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  In-Class
Weekly Hours:  Lectures, Workshops and Laboratory Exercises: 5
ECTS:  6
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able to:

 

  • Distinguish the recent developments and tendencies that prevail round the Information Systems.
  • Develop the basic significances of strategy of modern Information Systems, the approaches presented in the bibliography, as well as the enterprising practice.
  • Recognize the advantages for an Organisation from the application of modern Management Information Systems.
  • Determine the steps of analysis and development of modern Management Information Systems.
  • Develop Computer Based Management Information Systems.
  • Identify risks and difficulties emerged during the development and the application of Management Information Systems.

 

 

Module Description

The course is organized around topics such as:

 

  • Information & Information Systems, 
  • The strategic role of the MIS, 
  • Organizational Structure of the MIS,
  • MIS technologies,
  • Computer Based Information Systems, 
  • MIS Life cycle, 
  • Analysis, Design and MIS  Integration,
  • The Chen diagrams,  
  • The role of Data Base and Model Base in the development of a MIS.

 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Ι. Final Examination (60%) (Summative Evaluation) includes:

-Critical questions

-Short answer questions

-     Problems Resolve 

Evaluation Objective: To understand the fundamentals of the course.

Evaluation Criteria: Comprehensiveness, accuracy, and critical evaluation.

 

ΙΙ. Teamwork (40%) (Summative and Formative): 

Development of an MIS.

Evaluation Objective: To examine students' skills in MIS development tools and to enhance students' teamwork skills.

Evaluation Criteria: Functionality of the application, user-interface, organization and management of teamwork project and presentation.

 

Evaluation criteria are explicitly referred on the site of the course for each learning activity.

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Recommended Book :

Books

 

  • Υannakopoulos D., Papoutsis I., (2003). Management Information Systems, Synchroni Ekdotiki, Athens (in Greek).
  • Pollalis C, Υannakopoulos D., Papoutsis I., (2004). Business Information Systems, Stamoulis Publications, Athens (in Greek)
  • Ross A. Malaga, (2005). Introduction to Information Technology Systems" Publishing M. Giourdas, Athens (in Greek).
  • Folinas D Manthos B Vlachopoulou M, (2007). Integrated Information Enterprise Resource Management Systems, Anikoula Publications, Thessaloniki (in Greek)
  • Laudon K. C., Laudon J. P, (2009). Information Systems, 7th Edition, Prentice Hall, Athens (in Greek)
  • Economou C., N. Georgopoulos, Benos B, (2004). Information Systems Management Benos Publications (in Greek).
  • Pollalis C Voziki A, (2009). Information Enterprise Resource Planning Systems, UTOPIA Publications, Athens (in Greek)
  • James O'Brien and George Marakas, (2010). Management Information System, Mac Graw Hill Companies, 10th Edition.
  • Avison and Fitzerald, (1998). Information Systems Development: Methodologies, Techniques and Tools, McGraw-Hill Companies, 2nd Edition.   
  • Curtis Graham and David Cobham, (2001). Business Information Systems: Analysis, Design and Practice, Pitman Publishing, 4th Edition.
  • D. Anderson, (2000). Managing Information Systems: Using Cases within an Industry Context to Solve Business Problems with Information Technology, Prentice Hall.
  •  Laudon K. C. and J. P. Laudon, (2010). Management Information Systems, Prentice Hall, New Jersey, 11th edition.
  • Raymond McLeod and George Schell, (2006). Management Information Systems, Prentice Hall, 10th Edition.
  • Raymond McLeod Jr, (2001). Management Information Systems, Prentice Hall International, Inc. New Jersey, 8th edition.

Selected articles from the following journals:

  • International Journal of Information Management– Elsevier.
  • The Journal of Strategic Information Systems– Elsevier.
  • Information & Management– Elsevier.

PUBLIC RELATIONS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  In-Class
Weekly Hours:  Lectures and  Workshops: 4
ECTS:  4
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The course is intended to familiarize students with the basic theoretical concepts and approaches in  the field of Public Relations.  Special attention is given to the importance of treating public relations as an autonomous communication function in companies and organizations. 

Upon completion of the course students will be able to:

•Discuss the main concepts and approaches of Public Relations 

•Differentiate Public Relations from other communication functions 

•Employ effective communication actions in relation to all the stakeholders 

•Formulate effective Public Relations plans 

•Apply basic concepts of Public Relations in practice 

•Examine crisis communication plans through case studies

Module Description

•Historical overview

•Practice of PR in Greece and other selected countries

•Differentiation of PR from other communication functions

•Role of PR in strategic management  

•Basic concepts, tools and techniques of public relations  

•Development and implementation of PR programs  

•Target audiences of public relations 

•Public relations and the Media 

•Public relations in the public and private sector

•PR Crisis Communication

•Ethical codes of practice in Public Relations 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

I. Final Examination (70%) (Summative Evaluation) includes:

-Multiple choice questions and/or true-false questions

-Short answer questions

Evaluation Objective: To understand the fundamentals of the course.

Evaluation Criteria: Comprehensiveness, accuracy, and critical evaluation.

 

ΙΙ. Group Project (30%) (Summative Evaluation) includes: 

-  written work 

- public presentation  

Evaluation Objective: To examine students' skills and to enhance students' teamwork skills.

Evaluation Criteria: Degree of specifications' satisfaction, Categorization-organization-adaptation of material, structure and clarity of written text,  organization and management of teamwork project and presentation.

Recommended or required Bibliography

Recommended Book and Journal Article Resources:

         Books :

•Papalexandri  N., Lymperopoulos D (2014). Public Relations. Benos Publishers (in Greek). 

•Xyggi M (2012). Public Relations. Propompos Publications (in Greek) 

•Tench R, Yeomans L (2009). Exploring Public Relations, 2nd ed., Essex-England:Prentice-Hall

•Hendrix, J. (2008), Public Relations: Case studies  Iwn-G Parikos, Athens (in Greek) 

•Koutoupis T (2004) Practical Guide in Public Relations, Sakkoula Publishers (in Greek). 

 

Selected articles from scientific journals such as: 

•Journal of Communication Management

•Journal of Public Relations Research

•Public Relations Journal 

•Public Relations Review

ENTERPRENEURSHIP & INNOVATION

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  In-Class
Weekly Hours:  Lectures, Workshops: 5 (3L+2W)
ECTS:  6
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The course is the basic introductory course to the concepts of entrepreneurship and innovation. The contemporary, fast-changing economic, technological and social environment, which is formed by factors such as the globalization, the competition, the money markets, the innovation, as well as the consumers’ habits and preferences, establish the framework, within which, new chances for development appear, while, at the same time, new risks are generated. 

The course aims at the students’ introduction to the concepts of entrepreneurship and innovation. 

To be more exact, the course aims at the understanding, for the students’ part, of those activities and actions that relate to the detection of opportunities, as well as the enterprises’ effective operation. 

Furthermore, the course aims at the communication of basic knowledge of the enterprises’ economy, while the contribution of innovation and entrepreneurship to economy is also presented.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

a)know subjects concerning the enterprises’ technical and functional support

b)know the enterprises’ organization and structure

c)recognize and understand information concerning the technical and economic situation of the branch within which the enterprise operates

d)effectively cooperate with their colleagues, due to their participation in working groups during the course

e)meet professionals and this is a situation that creates perspectives concerning their employment in the future

f)reinforce their creativity through the implementation of business plans

g)develop abilities relevant to business

h)develop research ability in business environment

i)cultivate their judgment and their abilities on decision making in matters concerning the solution of practical problems

j)recognize investment and developmental incentives

k)recognize and utilize incentives concerning business at the beginning of their career

l)utilize business opportunities arising from the presentation of complete work at a wide spectrum of professionals.

Module Description

The course is organized around topics such as:

1.Analysis of the meaning of Entrepreneurship and Innovation.

2. Theoretical approach of Entrepreneurship and Innovation. 

3.Entrepreneurship and modern economical environment. 

4.Building new company. 

5.Business action plan: business description, market and competition, strategic marketing, functional organization, financing needs, assessment control of the firm and the businessman. 

6.Communities and statutes that reinforce entrepreneurship. 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Ι. Final Examination (60%), which includes:

-Multiple choice questions 

-topics for elaboration 

ΙΙ. Individual Project(s) (40%)

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Recommended Book Resources:

•Kyriazopoulos, P. – Vryzides, L. (2008). “Entrepreneurship: Introduction”, Sygchroni Ekdotiki Publishing, Athens. (in Greek)

•Lampropoulos, P. (2008). “Entrepreneurship”, Propobos Publishing, Athens. (in Greek)

•Karteranis, X. (2015) “Entrepreneurship”, Athens. (in Greek)

COORPORATE COMMUNICATION

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  In-Class
Weekly Hours:  Lectures and Workshops-Project Work: 4
ECTS:  4
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Purpose of the course is to introduce students to the role, significance and basic functions of corporate communications.  The course focuses on how businesses use communication strategically in order to be effective in the relations they hold with various stakeholders internal and external  to the company.  

 

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

•Recognize the basic concepts and approaches of corporate communications.  

•Design effective strategies of communication in relating to stakeholders internal and external to the organization such as the mass media, public opinion and change management in times of crisis. 

•Develop the role that corporate communication plays in corporate strategy and the formulation of corporate identity and image. 

•Examine and communicate the ethical aspects of corporate decisions regarding the relations the organization holds with various stakeholders. 

•Examine crisis communication plans through case studies 

 

Module Description

The course is organized around topics such as:

-The changing communication context 

-Forms of corporate communications 

-Theoretical approaches for effective communications 

-Internal and external communication (types of messages, target audiences) 

-Effective communication as part of the Management Function 

-Message Development: Framing of issues, Agenda-setting 

-Identification of target audiences, formulation and communication of message, selection of media, interactivity between organization and various publics 

-The role of communication in promotion of actions related to corporate social responsibility

-Issues Management  

-Communication Management in times of crisis 

-Analysis of case studies 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Ι. Final Examination (70%) (Summative Evaluation) includes:

-Multiple choice questions and/or true-false questions

-Short answer questions

Evaluation Objective: To understand the fundamentals of the course.

Evaluation Criteria: Comprehensiveness, accuracy, and critical evaluation.

 

ΙΙ. Teamwork (30%) (Summative Evaluation) includes: 

-  written work 

- public presentation  

Evaluation Objective: To examine students' skills and to enhance students' teamwork skills.

Evaluation Criteria: Degree of specifications' satisfaction, Categorization-organization-adaptation of material, structure and clarity of written text,  organization and management of teamwork project and presentation.

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Recommended Book and Journal Article Resources:

Books

• Stuart B, Sarow S, Stuart L (2007).   Integrated Business Communication in a Global Marketplace,  John Wiley & Sons  (translated into Greek, Kritiki Publishers, 2008)

• Bogga-Karteri K. (2005). Communication. University Studio Press, Thessaloniki (in Greek)  

•Argenti, P. (2012), Corporate Communication (6th Edition), McGraw-Hill.

•Cornelissen, J. (2011), Corporate Communication: A Guide to Theory and Practice, Sage Publications, London.

•Van Riel C and Fombrum C. (2007). Essentials of Corporate Communication: Implementing practices of effective reputation management, Routledge, London. 

•Taylor J., and Van Every E. (2000). The Emergent Organization. Communication as its site and surface, Erlbaum, Mahwah, New Jersey. 

Selected Articles from  academic journals such as:  

              Corporate Communication: An International Journal  

              Journal of Business Communication 

              Journal of Communication Management 

              Journal of Promotion Management

              International Journal of Strategic Communication 

              Management Communication Quarterly 

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT II

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  In-Class
Weekly Hours:  Lectures and Workshops-Project Work: 4
ECTS:  5
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The aim of the course is to introduce students to the theory and practice of Financial Management. Financial Management is designed to enhance students’ learning but also aims to provide the key elements needed to facilitate the decision makers to undertake long term financial decisions. Finance theory and practice are integrated throughout the course, reflecting the extent to which real world practice has been profoundly shaped by theoretical developments. 

Upon successful completion of the course the students will be able to:

•Develop analytical thinking and combine various factors  so as to be able receive fast right decisions that will ensure the effective economical result of the business

•Understand the approaches and methods  for selecting the best  financial alternative decisions

•Develop a high level  of flexibility so that they can overcome risk situations   with minimum financial loss

Module Description

The course is organized around topics such as:

-Financial System

-Time Value of Money

-Investment Appraisal Techniques under uncertainty

- Investment and Inflation

- Cost of Capital

- Share Valuation Models

- Increase of Share Capital

-Capital Structure

- Dividend Policy

- New Financial Products

Assessment Methods and Criteria

I. Final Examination (60%)

- Short answer questions

- Questions of solving  problems. 

Evaluation Objective: To understand the fundamentals of the course.

Evaluation Criteria: Comprehensiveness, accuracy, and critical evaluation.

ΙΙ. Individual Project (10%) 

IΙΙ. Group Project (30%) 

Recommended or required Bibliography

Books:

•Apostolopoulos I (2004), Special Issue of Financial Management, Stamoulis Publishers (in Greek).

•Vasileiou D and Ireiotis N, (2008), FInancial Management: Theory and Practice, Rossilli  Publishers (in Greek).

•Karathanasi G and Drakou An. (2010), Financial Management, Benou Publishers (in Greek). 

•Kiohos P. and Kiohos A. (2003), Portfolio Management and Financial Risks, Sychroni Ekdotiki Publishers (in Greek). 

•Weston & Brigham (1986), Principles in Financial Management and Policy, Papazisi Publishers (in Greek).

•Arnold, G. (2005) Corporate Financial Management, 3rd ed. Prentice Hall 

•Brealey,R. & Myers S and Allen,F Principles of Corporate Finance, 9th ed., McGraw Hill

• Birigham E., Ehrhardt, M. (2005), Financial Management: Theory and Practice,11th ed., Thomson South-Western.

•Lumby S., (1999), Investment Appraisal and Financing Decisions, Thomson Learning

LABOR RELATIONS AND INSTITUTIONS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  In-Class
Weekly Hours:  Lectures and Workshops-Project Work: 4
ECTS:  5
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

This course is designed to introduce the student to the essential knowledge of labor relations and industrial relations systems and participatory processes at work, labor law, European and Greek.

Also the best possible integration of the employee at work and on the other hand, better business organization as regards its relations with employees. Overall, the operation of both workers and businesses within the existing institutional system in which the employment relationship is regulated.

Upon successful completion of the course students will be able :

• To recognize the different industrial relations systems 

• To distinguish the procedure concerning worker participation and participatory institutions and instruments of trade union representation

• To classify the authorized services and agencies for employment

• To distinguish employee rights and obligations according to the scope of employment

• To defend employ rights before supervisory and control institutions.

• To analyze the field of labor relations in an interdisciplinary manner. 

• To synthesize proposals for legislative initiatives 

Module Description

  • Employee Relations and Labor Relations Systems 
  • The study of industrial relations in Greek reality 
  • The process of employee involvement. Participatory Institutions and Instruments union representation 
  • The utility and risks of the comparative study 
  • Interdisciplinary Approach Industrial Relations 
  • The employment contract: Obligations of employers and employees. The remuneration of labor. 
  • The time limits of the work. The labor protection. Salary and licenses. The termination of the employment relationship
  • Free collective bargaining. The trade union freedoms. The union action 
  • The public law dimension of labor law today and the characteristic of the modern labor protection law 
  • The modern nature of labor law and labor institutions. Flexibility and elasticity. Globalization 
  • The Social Dimension of European Integration and its effect on Employee Relations and institutions

 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final Examination (50%) that includes: 

theoretical and practical module with multiple choice questions and short answers 

Group Project (15%)

Individual Project (15%) 

Oral Presentation (20%) 

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Recommended Book and Journal Article Resources:

•Ntanos, A., Bousli, E. (2011), Employee Relations and Institutions, Ed. Synchroni Ekdotiki (in Greek) 

•Kouzis, G. Labour relations in Greece, Proposals for the upgrade, INE / GSEE iss.156 (in Greek)

•Spyropoulos, G. (1998), Industrial Relations in Greece, in Europe and internationally, Sakkoulas (in Greek)

•Stranis,  D. (2010), The Public Law Labor Law in the 21st Century - Private or State law, Sakkoulas Athens-Thessaloniki (in Greek)

•Lixouriotis, I. (2013), Individual labor relations, Nomiki Bibliothiki (in Greek)

•Lixouriotis, I. (2013), Collective Labor Relations, Nomiki Bibliothiki (in Greek)

•Koukiadis, I. (2013), Collective Labour Relations, Sakkoulas Athens-Thessaloniki (in Greek)

•Koukiadis, I. (2012), Individual labor relations and the law of labor flexibility, Sakkoulas Athens-Thessaloniki (in Greek)

Holley, W., Jennings, K., Wolters, R., (2008) The labor relations process, 9th ed.,   South Western Cengage Learning 

•Junker, A., (2007), Grundkurs Arbeitsrecht, C.H.Beck

 

Selected Scientific Journals

Epitheorisis Labour Law (in Greek)

Business & Corporate Law (IRP) -  Nomiki Bibliothiki (in Greek)

Business – Nomiki Bibliothiki (in Greek)

5th Semester

OBJECT ORIENTED PROGRAMMING

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  In-Class
Weekly Hours:  Lectures, Workshops and Laboratory Exercises: 6
ECTS:  6
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The course aims to equip the students with the necessary theoretical knowledge and practical skills relating to the current methodology and technology of software development. Particularly, emphasis is given to:

•the development of applications in Window environment (GUI) WEB environment.

•the methodological approach and techniques of object-oriented programming

 

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

•Describe and identify concepts related to object-oriented programming such as classes, objects, polymorphism, inheritance, abstraction and encapsulation.

•Describe and apply methodological approaches and techniques for designing and development of software applications utilising the object-oriented programming approach.

•Design small scale applications using the Design language UML.

•Develop small scale software applications using classes, objects, structures, interfaces, event handlers and overlapping functions.

•Compose programs by following syntax rules of object oriented programming.

•Utilize libraries of the WINDOWS programming environment.

Module Description

 

•Introduction to Object Oriented Programming (OOP)

•Methodological frame for OOP

•Design software applications

•The UML object oriented design language

•Software Development Environments for OOP

•Programming Language for OOP (C++, C#, Visual Basic, JAVA)

•Variables and operands

•Data types, structures

•Commands

•Assignment Operands

•Subroutines and functions

•Classes and Objects

•Interfaces

•Properties and Methods

•Arrays, Indexers and enumerators

•Delegates and Events

•Event handlers

•Polymorphism and Inheritance

•Subtraction and encapsulation

•File management

•Libraries

The practical part  of the  course includes the development of real world application in one of the following programming tools (VISUAL Studio.NET, C++, JAVA) 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Ι. Final Examination (60%) (Summative Evaluation) includes:

-Multiple choice questions 

-Short answer questions

-      Small software programmes

 

ΙΙ. Group Project (30%) (Summative Evaluation): 

Evaluation Criteria: 

•Functionality of application- 25%

•Completeness of applications - 40%

•Documentation - 20%

•Usability of application- 15%

 

ΙII. Individual Oral Presentation (10%) (Formative Evaluation): 

Individual Oral Examination at the Laboratory. 

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Recommended Book and Journal Article Resources:

•Spyridakos A., (2009) Object Oriented Programming in  Visual Basic.NET, Synchroni Ekdotiki Publishers (in Greek)

•Spyridakos A., (2010), Object Oriented Application in  Visual Basic.NET environment, Synchroni Ekdotiki Publishers (in Greek)

-Recommended Journals:

•Journal of Object Oriented Programming, SIGS Publications

TOTAL QUALITY MANAGEMENT (TQM)

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  In-Class
Weekly Hours:  Lectures - Workshops: 5
ECTS:  6
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The aim of this course is to introduce students to the philosophy and principles of Total Quality Management (TQM) as well as to provide them with the underlying principles and techniques of Total Quality Management (TQM) with emphasis on their application to organizations.

By the end of this course, student should be able to:

  • Develop and understanding on Total Quality Management (TQM) philosophies and frameworks.
  • Develop in-depth knowledge on various tools and techniques of Total Quality Management (TQM).
  • Evaluate the principles of quality management and to explain how these principles can be applied within quality management systems.
  • Develop a strategy for implementing TQM in an organization.
  • Identify the key aspects of the quality improvement cycle.
  • Select and use appropriate tools and techniques for controlling, improving and measuring quality.

Module Description

  • Introduction to Total Quality Management (TQM)
  • History of TQM
  • Application of Total Quality Management in Business
  • Organization and implementation of TQM
  • Satisfaction - Customer Service
  • The Concept of Customer
  • Customer Service Chain 
  • Factors that adds value to the customers ,
  • Criteria of Customer Service
  • Quality Management Systems - Standards
  • Basic Philosophy of Quality Management Systems
  • management
  • Effectiveness - Flexibility - Efficiency of Procedures
  • Developing Performance Indicators Process ,
  • Chart Process
  • Improvement Strategy ,
  • Improvement Process ,
  • Feedback Quality Management System
  • Cost of Quality
  • Categories o Cost of Quality
  • Cost of services provided,
  • Development Cost - Installation , Implementation - Maintenance Quality Management System

Assessment Methods and Criteria

 

Language Assessment: Greek

Final Examination (50%) (Summative Evaluation) includes: Multiple choice questions or true/false questions. Short answer questions and problems solve. The examination would take place with open books and notes.

  • Evaluation Objective: To understand the fundamentals of the course.
  • Evaluation Criteria: Comprehensiveness, accuracy, and critical evaluation.

Group Project (40%) (Summative Evaluation): Measuring Customer Satisfaction Survey.

  • Evaluation Objective: To examine students' skills in Measuring Customer Satisfaction Survey and to enhance students' teamwork skills.
  • Evaluation Criteria: Criteria for process might include things like: adoption of group roles and responsibilities, development of negotiation and leadership skills, demonstration of creative problem solving, responsiveness to feedback from group members, evidence of conflict management and resolution, evidence of reflective listening, appropriate organisation and time management, commitment to group processes, extent of contribution (e.g. gathering and researching information, preparing written reflections), written report, oral presentation, portfolio, design, performance).

Oral Presentation of Teamwork Project (10%):

  • Evaluation Objective: The oral presentation of teamwork project.
  • Evaluation Criteria: The use of professional presentation software, conclusions and recommendation, the language use, correct tone, the completeness of answers to questions

Evaluation criteria are explicitly referred on the site of the course for each learning activity.

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Recommended Book :

 

In Greek

  • Zavlanos, M. (2006), The Quality of Provided Services and Products. Athens, Stamoulis Publishing. (In Greek).
  • Tsiotras, G. (2002), Quality Improvement. Athens, Benos Publishing. (In Greek).
  • Grigoroudis B., Siskos G. (2000), Service Quality and Customer Satisfaction Measurement, New Technologies Publications. (In Greek).
  • Dervitsiotis, K. (2001), Competitiveness and Total Quality Management, Athens, 2nd Edition, Interbooks. Publishing. (In Greek).
  • Zavlanos, M. (2003), The Total Quality in Education. Athens, Stamoulis Publishing. (In Greek).
  • Logothetis, N. (1992), Total Quality Management, from Deming to Taguchi and SPC», TQM HELLAS INTERBOOKS Publishing. (In Greek).
  • Spanos, A. (1993), Total Quality Management, Galaios Publishing. (In Greek). (In Greek).

 

In Foreign Language

  • Crosby, P. B., Quality is free: the art of making quality certain, New York: McGraw-Hill, 1979.
  • Deming, W.E. (2000), Out of the Crisis, MIT Press, Cambridge, MA.
  • Evans J.R. and Lindsay W.M. (1999) The Management and Control of Quality, 4th edition, South-Western College Publishing, Ohio.
  • Feigenbaum. A.V. (1983) Total Quality Control 3rd ed. New York: McGraw-Hill.
  • Fortuna RM. (1990), The quality imerative. In E. C. Huge (Ed.) Total quality: An executive’s guide for the 1990s (pp. 3-25). Homewood, IL: Dow Jones-Irwin.
  • Goetsch, D.L., and Davis, S.B. (2006), Quality Management: Introduction to Total Quality Management for Production, Processing, and Services. Pearson Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ.
  • Juran, M., (2004), Architect of Quality: the autobiography of Dr. Joseph M. Juran, Mc Graw Hill, New York.
  • Nanda, V., (2005), Quality Management System Handbook for Product Development Companies, CRC Press, Florida.
  • Oakland, J., S., (1993), Total Quality Management, 2nd ed, Heinemann, Oxford 
  • Shewhart, Walter A. (1931). “Economic control of quality of manufactured product. New York: D. Van Nostrand Company.

 

Internet resources:

  • http://www.elot.gr
  • http://www.iso.org
  • http://www.efqm.org

 

Selected articles from the following journals:

  • Total Quality Management and Business Excellence - Taylor & Francis.
  • Journal of Quality Management – Elsevier.
  • Quality and Reliability Engineering International - Wiley InterScience.
  • Quality Engineering - Taylor & Francis.
  • Quality Progress – Wilson.
  • The Quality Assurance Journal - Wiley InterScience..

CONFLICT MANAGEMENT

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  In-Class
Weekly Hours:  Lectures and Workshops-Project Work: 5(3+2)
ECTS:  6
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The course aims to integrate the field of conflict in organizations and to consolidate the view that effective conflict resolution is an essential element for the effective administration and that the conflict is not 'bad', as stated in the traditional sense, but to actually use. It also aims to transmit modes, procedures and methods of conflict effective utilization.

Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able :

 

  • To identify and describe the contemporary perception of conflicts and their importance. 
  • To recognize the various alternative forms of conflict resolution. 
  • To apply as appropriate various models and methods of conflict resolution
  • To analyze and exploit the advantages of using non-state-sponsored procedures for resolving disputes related businesses.
  • To evaluate the compromise - reconciliation - arbitration conflict resolution as the most appropriate way to resolve against any form of formal resolution.

 

Module Description

• Define the concept of conflict. 

• The longitudinal view of the importance of conflict. The modern approach to conflict 

• Basic categories of conflict 

• Gift-conciliatory compromise conflict resolution 

• Various models and methods of conflict resolution 

• The role of the third party to resolve

• General categories settlement of conflicts - conflicts: Compromise - informal conflict resolution. Formal conflict resolution. 

• Distinction of conflict resolution within the private organization of conflict resolution in the context of Public Administration 

• Mediation and arbitration as appropriate forms of settlement both within the organization and in relation to external factors to the organization

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final examination (50%) that includes theoretical and practical module with multiple choice questions and essay

Group Project (15%)

Individual Project (15%) 

Oral Presentation (20%) 

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Recommended Book and Journal Article Resources:

Nikolopoulos, Α. (2009), Alone against all, negotiating strategy, Publ.Patakis (in Greek)

Stranis, D. (2013), Conflict Management, Notes. (in Greek)

Zavlanos, M. (2002), Organizational Behavior, Stamoulis Publications (in Greek)

Chitiris, L. (2001), Organizational Behavior,  Interbooks (in Greek)

Kalavros, K. (2011), Law of Arbitration, Sakkoulas Athens-Thessaloniki (in Greek)

Rahim, M.A. (2010), Managing Conflict in Organizations, London, Quorum Books

 

International Journal of Conflict Management

Journal of Conflict Resolution (JCR)

MANAGEMENT AND DEVELOPMENT OF HUMAN RESOURCES

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  FACE TO FACE
Weekly Hours:  Lectures and Workshops-Project Work: 5 (3+2)
ECTS:  6
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The last fifteen years’ facts have forced the companies to reexamine their enterprising priorities and give more emphasis on the value of customers, shareholders and employees. The traditional concept of value (Logistics- Financial) is abandoned and the Management and Development of human resources is considered as junctional parameter of business’s survival. Customers' satisfaction, the additional opportunities of activity, the protection of the environment and the contribution to programs of local societies give new value to the business. Due to Recession, financial resources that businesses have in their disposition are limited. The best possible cooperation between the departments is becoming even more imperative with the aim of the biggest contribution, with special gravity on the value that the department of Management and Development of human resources gives.

The aspects of Human resources can significantly help the businesses to face the competitive challenges and create advantage. The alignment of human resources management strategies with the business strategies is matter of most importance because it assists the company in applying its strategy. 

 

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

•describe real problems of human resources management and define the most suitable methodological approach and the steps they are about to make in solving the problem (methodological approaches, analysis of the complexity, finding satisfying routes, tools utilization, implementation of change).

•describe the way in which they will take advantage of the problem’s data processing results and support- by using arguments- the decisions they will make or suggest.

•utilize the experience or knowledge of previous cases, which are related to the particular examined problem and use them by adjusting them in the new conditions or particularities.

•analyze the problems related to roles and Human Resources Management activities and catalytically support the acceleration of organic processes of change, which are inherent in every organized system.

•create the frame in which individuals develop their creativity and undertake initiatives without rules of behavior from above.

•use suitable methodological tools to support Management and Human Resources Development

•analyze the data and results of the application of Human Resources Development supporting tools and suggest satisfying routes in solving problems that they examine and argue for their strategic choice. 

•To take advantage of the constant feedback that support tools offer them by creating alternative scripts of avoiding resistances and dead end points.

•To assess the results of processing and reconsider the model they developed in dynamic environment conditions.

Module Description

•Introduction- Redefining priorities

oNew economy challenge

oGlobal challenge

oChallenge of satisfying the needs of participants

oWork systems high output challenge

oChangeable role of Management and Development of Human Resources

oHuman resources management practice

oApplications- Case studies

•Competitive advantage- roles and responsibilities of Human resources management

oStrategic partner

oManagement expert

oEmployee’s advocate

oChange factor

oSkills of human resources development members- Professional sector

o Applications- Case studies

•Competitive challenges that affect Human Resources Management

oNew economy competition

oCompetition through work systems of high efficacy

oCompetition through satisfying participant’s needs

oCompetition through globalization

oHuman resources environment

oAcquirement and Preparation of Human Resources

oAssessment and evolution

oRewards

oApplications- Case studies

•Human Resources Management Strategy

oForm Strategy

oApply strategy

oStrategy types

oDirective strategies

oEmerging strategies

oS.W.O.T Analysis (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats)

oApplications- Case studies

•Human resources management Practice

oAnalysis and work planning

oHiring and choosing employees

oTraining and evolution

oOutput management

oReward form, motives and additional provisions

oWork relations and internal communication

oApplications- Case studies

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Ι. Final examinations (60%):

 - Multiple choice questions

 - Questions on the theoretical part of the course

 - Case studies regarding problems’ solution with taught methods

 

IΙ. Individual Project (40%) which contains:

-Short case studies related to matters of management and human resources development in which will be assessed the degree that students are able:

•to analyze data and the conditions of the case study,

•to model problems with the most suitable method,

•to define solutions and analyze the results.

Recommended or required Bibliography

RECOMMENDED BOOKS :

•Ntanos A., Samanta E., (2015), Introduction to Management and Development of Human Resources., Synchroni Ekdotiki Publishing (in Greek)

•Gary Dessler, (2012),  A Framework for Human Resource Management, Prentice Hall, 7th edition, ISBN-10: 0132576147, ISBN-13: 978-0132576147

-RELATED SCIENTIFIC JOURNALS:

•European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier

•Academy of Management

•Journal of Management Studies

•Journal of Organizational change management

•Human Resource Management, Elsevier

OPIMISATION METHODS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  In-Class
Weekly Hours:  Lectures, Workshops and Laboratory Exercises: 5
ECTS:  6
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The management in many cases  requires the optimization of parameters related to the operation, production and performance of businesses (maximize or minimize) such as revenue, profit, cost, resource utilisation etc. The Operational Research provides methodological tools which can support business managers in decisions making covering all the aspects (internal and external). The course aims to teach specialized methods of Operations Research and applications for optimisation problems. Students are required to have successfully completed the course "Operations Research "  where the basic methods and techniques of Operations Research are taught in order  to be able to understand  the methods of the course "Optimization Methods". 

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

•Describe administrative decision problems and identify those parameters that affect the case study of optimisation.

•Select the methodology or combination of methodologies to be used to solve the optimisation problems.

•Identify previous cases that constitute good practice and are related to the examined case.

•Analyze decision problems and design analytical models describing them.

•Apply fluently and effectively the appropriate to the case examined methodological frames and techniques.

•Develop applications using the familiar software tools (EXCEL / SOLVER, ENVI, MATLAB) to solve problems.

•Analyze and argue on the results and propose the solution or solutions to the underlying decision problem.

•Evaluate the results and use the appropriate feedbacks of the methodology used for refining of the results.

•Argue for the choice of the proposed decision.

Module Description

•Network Optimisation

oThe Assignment Problem 

oThe Transportation problem

oOptimisation of networks

oMaximisation of Network Flows

oThe Shortest Path Root problem

•MultiObjective Linear Programming

oProblem Formulation

oPay Off table construction

oMethod of satisfactory goals

oMethod of desired goals

• Stochastic Methods

oStochastic Modelling

oMonte Carlo Models

oStochastic Linear Programming

oStochastic Dynamic Programming

oQuay Theory

oSimulation

•Non Linear Programming

Languange Method

Heuristics

Non Linear Optimisation

•Optimisation of one variable

•Multi variables optimasation 

The practical part  of the  course includes the teaching of real world application and the development of applications with specific software (MS EXCEL/SOLVER, LINDO, MATLAB, ENVI)

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Ι. Final Examination (60%) (Summative Evaluation) includes:

-Multiple choice questions 

-Short answer questions

-       Problems solutions with the taught methods

 

ΙΙ. Group Project (30%) (Summative Evaluation): 

Course Work in groups of 2 or 3 students.

Evaluation Criteria: 

•Completeness - 35%

•Clearness - 25%

•Documentation - 30%

•Critical Evaluation- 10%

 

ΙII.  Individual Oral Presentation (10%) 

Laboratory Case Study 

Evaluation Criteria: 

•Completeness - 35%

•Clearness - 25%

•Documentation - 30%

•Critical Evaluation- 10%

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Recommended Book and Journal Article Resources:

•Branson Richard, Operational Research, Kleidarithmos Publishers, (in Greek)

•Georgiou A (2008), Non Linear Optimisation Methods, ZΗΤΗ Publishers

•Gupta C.B. (2008) Optimisation Methods of Operation Research, I.K. International publishers

•Bertsekas D. (2003) Convex Analysis and Optimisation, Athena Scientific.

•Rardin, Ronald L. (1997). Optimization in operations research, Prentice Hall. 

-Recommended Journals:

•European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier

•Optimisation Methods and Software, Taylor and Francis

•Journal of  Optimization Theory and Applications, Springer. 

6th Semester

DATABASES

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  In-Class
Weekly Hours:  Lectures, Workshops and Laboratory Exercises: 5
ECTS:  6
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The development of information Systems is based on Relational Data Bases Technology. This course covers the fundamentals of Relational Data Bases and presents in details the methodologies and techniques for designing and developing applications with the exploitation of Relational Data Base Management Systems. Also, the Structured Query Language is taught and applied.

 

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

•Describe the functions of Data Bases in enterprises or organizations and determine the usability for the data management.

•Explain and demonstrate how the data bases can be effectively used.

•Design data bases using the concepts of semantic, logical and physical design.

•Administrate and query data bases using SQL (Standard Query Language). 

•Develop data base applications using the popular Relational Data Base Management Systems (SQL SERVER, ORACLE, MySQL, ACCESS).

•Develop interfaces for windows (client-server) and WEB (n-tier) linked to Data Bases.

Module Description

Introduction to Data Base Systems

•File Based Applications

•Constraints of File Based Applications

•Data Bases and Data Base Management Systems (DBMS)

•Cons and Prons of DBMS

Fundamentals of Relational Data Bases

•Three Level architecture (ANSI-SPARC)

•Language for Data Bases

•Functions of data Bases

•Concepts of Relational Model Σχεσιακού Μοντέλου

•Relations in Data Bases

•Principles of Integrity 

•Views

Normilisations

•Normalised data Base

•Steps of Normalisations

•Functional Dependency

•Principles of Normalisations

•Techniques

Case Studies of Data Bases Design

•The Life Cyrcle

•Semantic Design.

•Logical Design

•Physical Design

•Transactions Design

The Language SQL

•Introduction to SQL

•Data Definition Language and Data Manipulation Language

•the commands CREATE, ALTER, DROP TABLE

•The command   SELECT  and its applications

•The join in SQL

•Views with SQL

•The commands  UPDATE and DELETE

•the commands GRANT and REVOKE

•Applications

Integrity management

•Data Base Administration

•Integrity Management 

•Recovery

Case Studies

Τhe practical part of the course  includes teaching of a Relational Data Base Management Systems (MS ACCESS, SQL Server, ORACLE, MySQL) and the development of an integrated Systems in one of the above mentioned RDBMS.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Ι. Final Examination (60%) (Summative Evaluation) includes:

-Multiple choice questions 

-Short answer questions

-     Problems concerning the design and development of Data Base applications

 

ΙΙ. Group Project (30%) (Summative Evaluation): 

Course Work in groups of 2 or 3 students.

Evaluation Criteria: 

•Completeness - 35%

•Clearness - 25%

•Documentation - 30%

•Critical Evaluation- 10%

 

ΙII. Individual Project (10%) (formative)

Development of a Data Base in the Laboratory

Recommended or required Bibliography

Recommended Book and Journal Article Resources:

•Elmasri, Ramez, Navathe, Shamkant B., Fundamentals of Data Base Systems, (in Greek)

•Connolly, Thomas M., Begg, Carolyn E., Data Base Systems (in Greek)

-Journals:

•Journal of Data Base Management, IGI GLOBAL

•International Journal of Intelligent Information and Data Base Systems, INDERSCIENCE Publishers.

DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEMS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  In-Class
Weekly Hours:  Lectures and Workshops-Project Work: 5
ECTS:  5
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

This course is designed to introduce the student to the principles, techniques and tools for modelling and solving decision making problems. The course highlighted and documented, by using the necessary rigor and instructive examples, all the major modern techniques and methodologies used at international level, incorporating certainty or uncertainty, such as ELECTRE and PROMETHEE methods, multicriteria value/utility theory . It provides insight into methods of quantitative and qualitative analysis for the effective handling of "real world" decision problems. Also it explains the principles of the theory of multicriteria analysis and its role in the Decision Support process. The course aims to equip students with a comprehensive understanding of the scientific approach to decision making, to understand the role of science in exercise effective management, but also the art of applying the theory in practice.

At the end of the course including lectures, assignments and practical exercises using original software packages decision support (DSS), students will be able to analyse a decision problem in terms of design alternatives, selection criteria and probabilistic situations, to choose the appropriate model for solving the problem and the corresponding DSS for support and documentation of the final selection.

Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

•Understand the process of modelling a problem and the process of making a decision based on one or more criteria

•Combine decision-making methods in the presence of conditions leading to known or/and unknown (probabilistic) outcome and how to use these methods

•Apply the decision-making techniques in group decision making

•Exploit the use of specific software to actively support multicriteria decision making to operational problems

•Define the process of applying innovative approaches and relevant knowledge to investigate problems , evaluate alternative actions, and making suggestions

•Design and support the development of user-friendly and comprehensive Decision Support Systems

Module Description

•Introduction and overview of Decision Models 

•Decision problems anatomy 

•General Modelling Methodology 

•Introductory Examples of Modelling 

•The notion of preference 

•Consistent family of criteria 

•Criteria weights elicitation 

•Simple Models of Discrete Decision 

•Lexicographical Method 

•Value Functions 

•ELECTRE Multicriteria Methods 

•PROMETHEE Methods 

•Aggregation-disaggregation approach

•UTA Methods and MINORA System

•Decision Making under uncertainty 

•Group Decision-making processes 

•Principles of Decision Support Systems - Design - Development Process - Subsystems 

•Database Management Systems 

•Artificial Intelligence & Expert Systems 

•Knowledge-based Decision Support Systems

•Group Decision Support Systems

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Language Assessment: Greek

 

Final Examination (70%) (Summative Evaluation) includes: 

-Modelling and solving "real world" decision problems 

•Evaluation Objective:  The examination of understanding on how modelling and solving decision problems.

•Evaluation Criteria: Proper implementation methodologies and practices in problems modelling, , the degree of the analysis of the proposed model, the presentation of the proposed solution.

-     Open questions on various issues - approaches in Decision Support Systems. 

•Evaluation Objective: The examination of knowledge concerning the fundamentals of the course.

•Evaluation Criteria: Accuracy, completeness, clarity and critical approach of responses

 

Individual Project (30 %). Modelling and solving two "real world” decision problems.

 

Evaluation Objective: The examination of skills developed by students in dealing with methods and tools for modelling and solving decision problems with multiple criteria.

Evaluation Criteria: The degree of understanding of the modelling process, the perception of the actual dimensions of a decision problem, the ability to effectively apply methods of modelling and problem solving, the ability to use problem-solving tools, the written report, the content, the design and presentation thereof.

Recommended or required Bibliography

Recommended Books:

1. Siskos Y., (2008), Decision Models, New Technologies Publications (in Greek)

2. Matsatsinis Ν. (2010), Decision Support Systems, New Technologies Publications (in Greek)

3. Siskos Y. (200), Decision Models, New Technologies Publications, 2nd Edition. (in Greek)

4. Figueira J., S. Greco and M. Ehrgott (2005)Multiple Criteria Decision Analysis: State of the Art Surveys, Springer.

5. Boy B.,(1985)  Methods Multicriteres d’Aide a la decision Economica

6. G. Prastakos (2000), Management Science: operational decisions in the Information Society,  Stamoulis, 2000 (in Greek)

 

Journal Article Resources:

1. European Journal of Operational Research  – Elsevier

2. OPERATIONAL RESEARCH An International Journal - Springer

3. Operations Research – INFORMS

4. Management Science – INFORMS

5. Computers & Operations Research - Elsevier

6. EURO Journal on Decision Processes - Springer 

MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  In-Class
Weekly Hours:  Lectures and Workshops: 2th+2ex
ECTS:  4
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Since firms have been developed the divide managerial responsibilities among a larger number of people. Companies are structured according to functions to assist in decision making and control. Though the business word no longer views accountants as “bean counters”, managerial accountant have an integral role in core decision making within companies. Specifically managerial accounting is the process of preparing, reporting and interpreting accounting information for use by an organization’s internal decision makers. More specifically different management functions within an organization, such as marketing and operations, require types of accounting information for planning and control decisions that differ from the needs of external decision makers and from those of other managers, e.g. labor cost, over head and material cost. Finishing successfully this course, students will be able to: 

-Manage accounting information for internal use

-Compose and control budgets

-Valuate assets and inventories 

-Measure and analyze the cost of products, services and procedures

-Evaluate corporate governance

Module Description

The course is organized around topics such as:

-Definitions for Managerial Accounting. Scope  of Managerial accounting – Differences from financial Accounting

-The role of managerial accounting in planning and control

-Planning – Budgeting – control 

-Managerial Accounting and operations

-Valuation methods

-Cost methods

-Cost of inventories and services

-Cost Analysis

-Theoretical aspects of Managerial Accounting and cost accounting 

-Corporate Governance

 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

I.Final Examination (80%) that is comprised of multiple choice questions.

II.Individual Project (20%)

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Recommended Book and Journal Article Resources:

•Dimitras A. and Mpalas A. (2009),  Managerial Accounting,  Gutenberg Pubs, Athens (In Greek)

•Filios Β., (2013), Managerial Accounting,  EUA, Athens (in Greek)

•Garrison.R., Noreen. E., (2003) Managerial Accounting,   Papazisi Publishers, Athens (in Greek)

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY FOR MANAGERS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  In-Class
Weekly Hours:  Lectures, Workshops and Laboratory Exercises: 5
ECTS:  6
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The aim of this course is to introduce students to research methodology in order to have the opportunity to study and prepare a scientific text and especially to have the knowledge and skills to develop their dissertation.

 

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

•Understand the different ways of research approach

•Investigate the literature and be able to prepare a literature review of a topic

•Choose the appropriate methodological approach to various case studies

•Carry out sample surveys and calculate the appropriate sample size

•Recognize the limitations of research

•Compare survey results

Module Description

The course is organized around topics such as:

• Report on research philosophy

• Study literature

• Search hardware and statistical data ,

• Defining the methodology in several case studies

• Sampling technics -types of sampling

• Determination of sample size

• Measuring ranges of qualitative and quantitative data ,

• Validity and reliability of questionnaire

• Presentation and analysis of results,

• Critical discussion and comparison of findings with other studies,

• Conclusions and suggestions for further research and analysis.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Ι. Final Examination (50%) (Summative Evaluation) includes:

-Multiple choice questions or true/false questions

-Short answer questions 

Evaluation Objective: To understand the fundamentals of the course.

Evaluation Criteria: Comprehensiveness, accuracy, and critical evaluation.

 

ΙΙ. Group Project (30%) (Summative Evaluation): 

Development of a research proposal

Evaluation Objective: To examine students' skills.

Evaluation Criteria: Completeness of the project

ΙII. Multiple Choice Test (10%) (Formative Evaluation)

Concerns issues covered by lectures. 

Evaluation Objective: Examination of students' progress in relation to learning outcomes, feedback and fine tuning of the course lectures.

Evaluation Criteria: Comprehensiveness, accuracy, and critical evaluation.

 

ΙV. Laboratory Exercise (10%) (Formative Evaluation): 

Concerns issues covered by laboratory lessons. 

Evaluation Objective: Examination of students' progress in relation to learning outcomes, feedback and fine tuning of the laboratory lessons.

Evaluation Criteria: Comprehensiveness, accuracy, and critical evaluation.

Evaluation criteria are explicitly referred on the site of the course for each learning activity.

Recommended or required Bibliography

Books

•Earl R. Babbie, (2016), The Practice of Social Research, 14th Edition,  Chapman University, Berkeley, ISBN-10: 1305104943, ISBN-13: 9781305104945 

•Yves Gagnon, (2010), The case study as a research method a practical handbook, Press de la Universite du Quebec.

 

Journals

•Journal of research methods and methodological issues

•Journal of research methods

•Journal of research methods and analytics

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  In class
Weekly Hours:  4 (2+2)
ECTS:  6
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of the course students will be able to:

 

- Know the basic principles of Public Administration

- Recognize the importance of both institutions, the central government and the local and regional authorities

- Describe the institutional role of proper Public Administration

- Distinguish the operational problems that occur across the Public Administration

- Analyze the basic rules that contribute to the effectiveness of Public Administration

- Evaluate the contribution of the Public Administration to the citizen

- Take the public interest into account 

- Associate the problems that occur into the Public Administration

- Use and recommend proposals and arguments related to the resolution of operational problems that occur across the Public Administration

- Evaluate the effectiveness of Public Administration in serving citizen interests

Module Description

- Conceptual approach to Public Administration

- Control of Public Administration

- Principles of Public Administration action

- Independent authorities of Public Administration 

- The Organization of the Central Administration

- Administrative decentralization

- Regional development

- The staff of the Public Administration

- The permanence of public employees

- Local Government

- The weaknesses of the Greek Local Government

- Public Administration and Citizens

- Special operational problems in Public Administration

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final Examination (80%)

The process of final evaluation includes short-answer questions and problems’ solving.

 

Oral Presentation (20%) (Formative Assessment)

The process of mid-term evaluation includes student responses to problems posed to them after each lecture.

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Recommended Book and Journal Article Resources:

 

Suggested main Bibliography:

Ntanos An. (2014). Public administration. Athens: Editions Modern Publishing.

Kontis Th. (2000). Introduction to Public Administration. Athens: Editions Modern Publishing.

 

Suggested Secondary Bibliography:

Makridimitris Ant. (2010). Public administration. Athens: Editions Sakkoulas.

Floratos Ch. (1998). The Public Administration from another look. Athens.

BUDGETING

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  In-Class
Weekly Hours:  Lectures and Workshops-Project Work: 5
ECTS:  5
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The aim of the course is to prepare the students to the use of budgets in business organizations. It aims to help students to apply financial disciplines to the management of organizations as well as to set up and operate a budgetary control system. The course is intended to be a useful practical aid to all students who want to go deeply in understanding the work of the budgetary control within a business firm.

Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

•Analyse and pose business goals for the next period

•Evaluate the  factors influenced  the financial risk

•Prepare and plan the budget planning for each unit or activity of the firm

•Prepare and plan the master budget of the firm

•Prepare financial statements 

•Use Sensitivity Analysis approaches to predict economic outcomes

Module Description

-An Introduction to Budgeting

-Administration of the Budgetary Process

Risk analysis

-Financial Objectives and Budgets

-Operating and Expenditure Budget

-Budgeting for Asset Costs

-Funds Flow and Working Capital Budget

-Performance Monitoring and Control

-Capital Expenditure Budget

-Income Budget

-Budgeting Financial Statements

-Forecast versus Budget

-Reporting

Assessment Methods and Criteria

I. Final Examination (30%)

-  Answer questions

Evaluation Objective: To understand the fundamentals of the course.

Evaluation Criteria: Comprehensiveness, accuracy, and critical evaluation.

 

ΙΙ. Group Project (70%) (Summative Evaluation): 

Evaluation Objective: To examine students' skills in internet tools and services and to enhance students' teamwork skills.

Evaluation Criteria: Functionality of the application, the degree of specifications' satisfaction, user-interface, organization and management of teamwork project and presentation.

Recommended or required Bibliography

1. Apostolopoulos J., (2004),Special Issue of Financial Management, Stamoulis Publishers., (in Greek).

2. Garoufalis K., (2016), Financial Planning: Markets, Decision Making, Financial Accounting, Budgeting, Synchroni Ekdotiki (in Greek)

3. Karathanasis G and Drakou An. (2010), Financial Management, Benou Publishers., (in Greek). 

4. Prastakos Gr., Management: Decision Making,(2006)., Stamoulis Publishers.,(in Greek).

5. Weston F.,-Bringham E. (1986), Principles of Financial Management and Policy, Papazissis Publishers.,Athens.(in Greek).

6. Atrill & McLaney (1999), Accounting for non specialists, Prentice Hall Europe 1999

7. Biggs C., Benjamin D.,(1992), Management Accounting Techniques, Chartered Institute of Management Accountants, CIMA, London.

8. Collier P., CookeT., (1992), Financial and Treasury Management, Chartered Institute  of Management Accountants, CIMA, London.

9. Douglas G.,(1992), Makiing Budgets Work: The Control and use of the budgetary  Control process, CIMA.

10. Elliot B., Elliot J., (2004), Financial Accounting and Reporting, 8th ed., Prentice Hall.

11. Nugus S.,(2005), Finacial Planning Using Excel, 2nd ed., CIMA

12. Peyrard J., (1990),Gestion Financieres avec exercises, ed.PUF,Paris.

13. Wyatt N.,((2012),Budgeting and Forecasting : How to deliver accurate numbers, FT Publication, Pearson.

SALES MANAGEMENT

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  In Class
Weekly Hours:  Lectures, Class Work/Workshops: 5
ECTS:  5
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course students will be able to:

• Analyse contemporary forms of sales department organization for performance and sales growth in a globalized economy.

•Evaluate the correct organizational structure of sales to be able to compete and improve their efficiency.

• Apply modern sales techniques to meet the increased requirements under such a role in today's business environment.

• Demonstrate the necessary conceptual background on the principles of personal selling process techniques and strategies.

• Evaluate the potential for increasing sales through the adoption and proper use of personal selling techniques.

Module Description

1. Understanding the difference between marketing, negotiating and selling.

2. Different types of selling and the techniques associated with them.

3. The Eternal Triangle (Sales team, Organisation and Client)

4. Sales Force organisation

5. The Role of the Sales Manager

6. The Ethics of Selling

7. International Selling

8. The Psychological aspects of Sales

9. Role of a sales manager in an organisation 

10. Personal selling processes 

11. Customer relationship management 

12. Specialisation and centralisation of the sales force function 

13. Sales forecasting 

14. Recruiting and staffing a sales force 

15. Sales force training and development 

16. Reward systems 

17. Sales force evaluation methods

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final Examination (Multiple choice questions plus open-ended questions) 60%

Group Project (20%)

Oral Presentation (20%)

Recommended or required Bibliography

P. Kyriazopoulos and P. Zairis (2005) Sales Techniques Publisher Synchrony Ekdotiki Athens (in Greek)

Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science http://jam.sagepub.com

INTERNATIONAL MARKETING

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  In class
Weekly Hours:  Lectures: 3, Class Work/Workshops: 2
ECTS:  6
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The companies’ activities and efforts in the international area are becoming a key factor in their ability to maximize their turnover and profits. The course is aimed at providing a theoretical framework, so that students can acquire a deep knowledge of the concept of global marketing and the process of focusing on and taking advantage of opportunities in the global marketplace. Some of the main topics that are addressed include the evaluation of foreign markets, the evaluation of promotion and distribution channels in those markets, as well as exports’ management. The most recent trends in international marketing are also outlined.

•Distinguish between Trade & marketing at the international level

•Demonstrate an understanding of the international environment in relation to marketing activities

•Identify & interpret international marketing opportunities

•Evaluate the process of market entry strategy for all types of firms 

•Undertake international & Global marketing activities in product, pricing, promotion & distribution

Module Description

Comparison between international marketing and international trade; Evaluation of Theories of trade and their relevance to international and global activities; Investigating Transaction –cost theory and network analysis in relation to international & Global marketing.

Understanding the nature and component of the international & global environment; Measuring International and global market segmentation; Analysis of International & global marketing strategies; Comparison and application of International & Global market entry modes to different types of firms.

Evaluation & application of international & global product decisions; Analysis &application of International & global pricing decisions; Comparison & contrasting of International & global promotion in different contexts.

International & Global Marketing in Developing countries; International & Global   Marketing in Emerging markets.

Review and analysis of the variables affecting the international & global marketing process.

The importance of the political and economic environment in global marketing efforts

Opportunities in global marketing

Global segmentation - targeting

Choosing markets and alternative ways of entering in the global markets

Global competition and strategy 

Global supply chain strategy – sales channels

Global communication / promotional media

Global management structures and marketing management

The future of global marketing

Assessment Methods and Criteria

•Final Examination (60%)

•Group Project (40%) A written assignment (International Marketing Plan)

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Recommended Book and Journal Article Resources:

 Tomaras P.. (2009) Industrial Marketing Publisher:Tomaras P. Athens,   (ISBN: 978-960-90674-3-0).(in Greek)

 Brennan R.,  Canning L., McDowell R., (2007)  Business-to-Business Marketing, Sage Publications Ltd 

Industrial Marketing Management The International Journal of Marketing for Industrial and High-Tech Firms http://www.journals.elsevier.com/industrial-marketing-management/

CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  In-Class
Weekly Hours:  Lectures - Project Work: 4
ECTS:  4
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The aim of this course is to introduce students to the philosophy and principles of Consumer Behavior as well as to provide them with the underlying principles and techniques of Consumer Behavior with emphasis on their application to organizations.

 

By the end of this course, student should be able to:

 

  • Illustrate the contemporary approaches to the study of consumer behaviour.
  • Explain the theoretical concepts pertaining to consumer psychology.
  • Understand the role of consumer behavior in marketing.
  • Understand the essence of how consumers make decisions and assess the relevant implications for marketing practitioners.
  • Identify qualitative and quantitative methods of measuring consumer behavior.
  • Understand the managerial significance of studying Consumer Behavior in a competitive marketplace and how Consumer Behavior can be located within a broader framework of marketing and business strategy

 

Module Description

The course is organized around topics such as:

 

 

  • Introduction to Consumer Behavior.
  • Fundamental principles and concepts of consumer behavior.
  • Models of consumer behavior.
  • External influences consumer behavior.
  • Sign in consumer behavior with marketing.
  • Consumer behavior and marketing strategy.
  • Procedures for making purchasing decisions.
  • Theory and methods of segmentation of the consumer market.
  • Stadiums making purchasing decisions.
  • Modern methods of analysis of consumer behavior based on the characteristics of products and services.
  • Consumer satisfaction.
  • Consumer behavior towards innovation.
  • Factors influencing consumer behavior.
  • Perception, learning and attitudes of consumers.
  • Demographic characteristics of the consumer.
  • The importance of information in the study of consumer behavior.
  • Satisfaction - consumer dissatisfaction.
  • Indicators of consumer satisfaction.
  • Consumer protection.

 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Language Assessment: Greek

 

Final Examination (50%) (Summative Evaluation) includes: Multiple choice questions or true/false questions. Short answer questions and problems solve. The examination would take place with open books and notes.

  • Evaluation Objective: To understand the fundamentals of the course.
  • Evaluation Criteria: Comprehensiveness, accuracy, and critical evaluation.

 

Group Project (40%) (Summative Evaluation): Measuring Consumer Behavior Survey.

  • Evaluation Objective: To examine students' skills in Consumer Behavior Survey and to enhance students' teamwork skills.
  • Evaluation Criteria: Criteria for process might include things like: adoption of group roles and responsibilities, development of negotiation and leadership skills, demonstration of creative problem solving, responsiveness to feedback from group members, evidence of conflict management and resolution, evidence of reflective listening, appropriate organisation and time management, commitment to group processes, extent of contribution (e.g. gathering and researching information, preparing written reflections), written report, oral presentation, portfolio, design, performance).

 

Oral Presentation of Group Project (10%):

  • Evaluation Objective: The oral presentation of teamwork project.
  • Evaluation Criteria: The use of professional presentation software, conclusions and recommendation, the language use, correct tone, the completeness of answers to questions

 

Evaluation criteria are explicitly referred on the site of the course for each learning activity.

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Recommended Book :

In Greek

 

  • Baltas G., Papastathopoulou, P., (2013) Consumer Behaviour: Principles-Strategies-Applications, Rosili Publishing. (In Greek).
  • Siomkos G.,(2011), Consumer Behavior and Marketing Strategy, Stamoulis Publishing. (In Greek).
  • Magnisalis, K. (1997), Behavior Consumer, Interbooks Publishing. (In Greek).

In Foreign Language

 

  • Blackwell, R.D., Miniard, P.W., Engel, J.F. (2001). Consumer Behavior (9th edition). Fort Worth: Harcourt College Publishers.
  • Hawkins I. Del et al, (2004), Consumer Behavior – Building Marketing Strategy, 9th Edition, Boston: Mc Graw Hill-Irwin.
  • Hoyer W. D., Macinnis D. J., (2009), Consumer Behavior, fifth edition, South Western, USA.
  • Martin Evans, Gordon Foxall and Ahmad Jamal, Consumer Behaviour, John Wiley and Sons Ltd, 2009.
  • Peter P.J., Olson J.., Grunert G.K., (1999), Consumer Behavior and Marketing Strategy, European Edition, McGraw Hill
  • Schiffman G. L., Kanuk L. L.0 (2004), Consumer Behavior, Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall
  • Solomon M., Bamossy G., Askegaard S., (2002), Consumer Behavior: A European Perspective, 2nd Edition, Financial Times, Prentice Hall.
  • Solomon, M., (2007), “Consumer Behavior: Buying, Having and Being”, Fifth edition, Pearson International Edition.

Internet resources:

 

  • http://www.efpolis.gr
  • http://www.kepka.org
  • http://www.synigoroskatanaloti.gr
  • http://www.ekpizo.gr
  • http://www.inka.gr
  • http://www.biozo.gr
  • http://www.beuc.org
  • http://ec.europa.eu/consumers
  • http://www.consumersinternational.org
  • http://www.anec.eu
  • http://pomek.gr
  • http://www.newinka.gr
Selected articles from the following journals:
  • Journal of Consumer Research.
  • Journal of Consumer Marketing – Emerald.
  • International Marketing Review - Emerald.
  • International Journal of Consumer Studies – Wiley.
  • Journal of Consumer Behaviour – Wiley.
  • Journal of Consumer Psychology – Elsevier.

 

INTEGRATED MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  In-Class
Weekly Hours:  Lectures and Workshops-Project Work: 4
ECTS:  4
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Purpose of the course is to introduce students to the significance of developing and implementing an integrated marketing plan based on the integration of various communication functions such as direct marketing, advertising, public relations, sponsoring, sales promotion and digital marketing. 

Upon successful completion of this module the learner will be able to:

•Identify the role of integrated communications in the management of corporate communication

•Recognize the importance of integrated communications in the digital era 

•Compare the contribution of each communication function in the design of the integrated marketing plan 

•Develop integrated marketing plans for businesses and organizations 

•Evaluate effectiveness of integrated marketing plans through case studies

Module Description

The course is organized around topics such as:

-Introduction to the concept of integrated marketing communications and its importance in the digital era.  

-The role of integrated communications in communication strategy  

-Analysis of constituent parts of the integrated communications mix (advertising, sales promotion, direct marketing, public relations, sponsoring, digital marketing) 

-Stages in the development of the integrated communication plan (research, segmentation, positioning, creative idea , media plan, evaluation) 

-Managing communication  with various stakeholders and publics 

-Analysis of case studies 

 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Ι. Final Examination (70%) (Summative Evaluation) includes:

-Multiple choice questions 

-Short answer questions

-    Problem solving 

 -  Comparative evaluation of contribution of aspects of each communication function to the effectiveness of integrated marketing plan 

Evaluation Objective: To understand the fundamentals of the course.

Evaluation Criteria: Comprehensiveness, accuracy, and critical evaluation.

 

ΙΙ. Group Project (30%) (Summative Evaluation) includes: 

-  written work 

- public presentation  

Evaluation Objective: To examine students' skills and to enhance students' teamwork skills.

Evaluation Criteria: Degree of specifications' satisfaction, Categorization-organization-adaptation of material, structure and clarity of written text,  organization and management of teamwork project and presentation.

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Recommended Book and Journal Article Resources:

Books

•Belch, G. & Belch, M. (2009). Advertising and Promotion: Integrated Marketing Communication (8th edition),  McGraw-Hill (translated into Greek, Tziolas Publications 2012) 

•Schultz, D., Patti C, Kitchen P. (eds)(2011). Integrated Marketing Communications in the 21st Century, Ro

•Caywood, Clarke (2011). The Handbook of Strategic Public Relations and Integrated Communications,  2nd ed., McGraw-Hill. 

•Blakeman Robyn (2007). Integrated Marketing Communication: Creative Strategy from Idea to Implementation. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.

•Wilson, L., & Ogden, J. (2008). Strategic communications planning for effective public relations and marketing (5th ed.). Dubuque, Iowa: Kendall Hunt Publishing Company.

• Hendrix, J. (2004), Public Relations Cases,  (6th edition) Wadsworth/Thomson Learning (translated in Greek, Ion Publications, 2008) . 

•Reis, Al and Trout, Jack (2000). Positioning. The Battle for your mind. McGraw-Hill. 

 

Selected articles from journals such as:  

•Corporate Reputation Review 

•Journal of Advertising

•Journal of Advertising Research 

• Journal of Business Research

•Journal of Promotion Management

•Journal of Marketing Communications 

•Journal of Marketing Management 

•Journal of Communication Management

•International Journal of Advertising 

•Public Relations Review 

•Strategic Communication Management

7th Semester

INSTITUTIONS OF THE EUROPEAN UNION

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  In-Class
Weekly Hours:  Lectures and Workshops-Project Work: 5
ECTS:  6
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The course aims to consolidate the perception of the importance of the institutional structure and in particular the institutions of the EU to shape reality and the context in which moving European citizens and businesses, without clear knowledge of which any business action is ineffective.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able : 

• To distinguish the fundamental rules and principles of the Law of EE, which constitute the environment in which they are asked to move and develop their activities, the European citizens and enterprises, as EU law has the force of domestic law. 

• To implement procedures and rules before the various EU institutions particularly concerned about the application of the Competition.

• Τo categorize and synthesize the procedures governing the functioning of EU institutions.

• To assess and evaluate the importance in daily activities and in any future prospect both the law and the EU institutions as well as the fundamental rights and freedoms guaranteed under the EU European citizens and European businesses.

Module Description

• Establishment and development of the European Communities 

• Objectives of the European Union and means of achieving these 

• The institutions of the European Union 

• European policies and institutions of the EU 

• Principles of the law of the European Union. Primary and secondary legislation 

• Institutional framework in the sense of the distribution of powers between the Union and the Member States 

• Judicial protection 

• Fundamental freedoms of Union 

• Competition

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final examination (50%)  that includes: 

theoretical and practical module with multiple choice questions and critical evaluation

Individual Project (15%)

Group Project (15%)

Oral Presentation (20%)

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Recommended Book and Journal Article Resources:

Bampalioutas L. (2014), European Integration and Regional Policy of the EU, Sakkoulas

Pliakos, A. (2006), European Union Law I, Economics and Business AUEB Company SA.

Kotsiris, L. (2012), European Commercial Law, Sakkoulas

Mussis, N. (2011), European Union, Papazisis

Kanellopoulos, P. (2010), The Law of the European Union, Sakkoulas, 

Karidis, G. (2004), European business law and competition P.N.Sakkoulas

Peterson, J., Shackleton, M. (2012), The Institutions of the European Union, Oxford University Press

Ruelling, M.H., Ioannou-Naoum-Wokoun, K. (2010), Die Europäische Union: Geschichte, Institutionen, Recht, Politiken, Europäischer HochSchul Verlag GmbH & Co

 

Related-journals:

Europeans State, Editions P.N.Sakkoula

Greek Review of European Law, Ed. International & European Economic Law Centre

BUSSINES DEONTOLOGY AND ETHICS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  In class
Weekly Hours:  5 (3L. + 2W.)
ECTS:  6
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of the course students will be able to:

- Know the basic principles of Business Deontology and ethics 

- Recognize the functioning of a modern organization

- Describe the specific activities of the modern manager

-Distinguish the problems that occur across the application of the principles of Business Deontology and ethics

- Analyze the basic rules that contribute to the effectiveness of modern organizations during the implementation of Business Deontology and ethics

- Evaluate the principles and values of the code of Business Deontology and ethics

- Consider the proper functioning of modern organizations and enterprises while taking advantage of business code of ethics and social responsibility

- Use and develop proposals and arguments directly related to the exact implementation of Business Deontology and ethics

- Foresee the potential related to the use of business ethics code

Module Description

- Modern approach to administration of enterprises and organizations

- Administrative formations

- The modern role and the managers’ mission 

- The current leadership trends

- Types of leaders

- Management Methods

- Systems and management processes

- Code of ethics and business’ deontology

- Administrative deontology and professional training

- Corporate and social responsibility

- Organizational culture

- Special administrative problems and techniques for their resolution 

- Review dimension of business deontology and corporate social responsibility

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final Examination (80%) (Summative)

The process of final evaluation includes short-answer questions and problems’ solving.

Oral Presentation (20%) (Formative)

The process of formative evaluation includes student responses to problems posed to them after each lecture.

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Recommended Book and Journal Article Resources:

Suggested main Bibliography:

Ntanos An. (2015). Business deontology and Practice. Athens: Editions Modern Publishing.

Suggested Secondary Bibliography:

Ntanos A. - Mantas N. - Kakounis P. (1992). Administrative Deontology and Practice. Athens: Editions Modern Publishing.

INDUSTRIAL MARKETING

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  In class
Weekly Hours:  Lectures and Workshops-Project Work: 3(theory), 2(workshop)
ECTS:  6
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The Industrial Marketing is the science that complements and further develops the knowledge of students in the subject of marketing taking into account the economic constraints of the business and its operation conditions while giving students the possibility to identify opportunities and risks in the industrial enterprise   in the case of industrial markets, suppliers change, identification of appropriate suppliers, relevance of the themes selected, promotion of industrial products as well as relations between companies.

Upon successful completion of the course students  will be able to:

• Integrate the marketing mix elements in the industrial markets.

• Apply strategies of industrial relations between the industrial partners

•Comprehend the purchasing behavior of industrial customers.

•Evaluate  the industrial purchasing decisions

Module Description

Basic concept of Industrial Marketing: Industrial Marketing, consumer and industrial products, consumer and industrial marketing, differences of consumer and industrial marketing.

Industrial markets: Industrial customers, specificities of industrial markets, the environment of Industrial Marketing. The specificities and the risks in international markets. The trends in globalization of industrial markets.

Organization’s purchasing behaviour, system of purchasing decisions: System of taking decisions in the Industrial Marketing. The poles in the system of taking purchasing decisions in Industrial Marketing. Factors that affect the purchasing decision in Industrial Marketing. Process of taking purchasing decisions for industrial products. Types of purchasing activities in Industrial Marketing. Marketing Strategies for the purchasing activities and the stages of the process of taking purchasing decisions. Information sources that are used from members of the  Taking purchasing decisions’ system.

Strategic planning of Industrial Marketing and segmentation of industrial market. Industrial Marketing and governmental supplies: Introduction to the strategic planning, analysis of external and internal environment. Process of Industrial Marketing’s strategic planning. The necessity and usefulness of segmentation. Segmentation of two stages and main factors of industrial markets’ segmentation. Two-step segmentation using the “foleaki” approach. The effect of the economic environment on business trading. Transaction between enterprises inside the Greek economy. Procurement in the public sector. The institutional framework of procurement in the public sector.

Research in International Industrial market. Information management systems with modern technology and relational marketing: The basis for the research of Industrial Marketing. Stages of the process of Industrial Marketing’s research. Relating Marketing. Customer relationship management/ marketing (CRM). Different approach for CRM. Appliance fields, advantages, disadvantages of CRM. Problems, modern trends and progress of CRM.

The product and the distribution in  Industrial Marketing: The importance of industrial products. Administration and revitalization of existing industrial products. The distribution within the marketing mix. Marketing distribution functions, main forms of intermediate, forms of industrial channels. Design, selection and management of distribution channels.

Pricing and Promotion in Industrial Marketing: The importance of pricing in Industrial Marketing. In-house and external factors determine the price. Procedures, processes and pricing policies. The mixture promotion in industrial marketing. Sales promotion, advertising, direct marketing, public relations and personal selling.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final Examination :60%

Group Project (40%) written role playing project with oral presentation

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Recommended Book and Journal Article Resources:

Tomaras P. (2009). Industrial Marketing. Published by the author. Athens, (ISBN: 978-960-90674-3-0). (in Greek)

Brennan R.,  Canning L., McDowell R., (2007)  Business-to-Business Marketing, Sage Publications Ltd 

Industrial Marketing Management The International Journal of Marketing for Industrial and High-Tech Firms http://www.journals.elsevier.com/industrial-marketing-management/

MONEY AND CAPITAL MARKETS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  In-Class
Weekly Hours:  Lectures and Workshops-Project Work: 5
ECTS:  6
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The purpose of the course is to present in a simple and understandable way the role of the financial markets and the financial products in the competitive money and capital markets as well as to introduce students to the portfolio theory.

 

Upon successful completion of the course students will be able:

-  To combine knowledge and apply them in the real world

-  To take decisions regarding the return on investment capital

-  To treat financial risk in a proper way in order to achieve the maximum financial results

Module Description

The course is organized around topics such as:

-The International Financial System

-Money Markets

-Bond Markets

-F/X Markets

-Portfolio Theory

-Technical Analysis, 

-New Financial Products

-Macroeconomic Stability

-Quantity Theory of Money

Assessment Methods and Criteria

I. Final Examination (70%)

- Short answer questions

- Questions of solving  problems. 

Evaluation Objective: To understand the fundamentals of the course.

Evaluation Criteria: Comprehensiveness, accuracy, and critical evaluation.

 

ΙΙ. Individual Project (30%) 

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Recommended Book and Journal Article Resources:

 

1.Karathanassi G., Drakos Ath.,(2010), Financial Management,Benos Publishers (in Greek)

2.Karathanassi G.,(1999), Financial Management and Financial MarketsBenos Publishers (in Greek)

3.Mylonas N.,(2005), Financial Derivatives,Tipothito Publishers (in Greek)

4.Spyrou Sp.,(2013), Money and Capital Markets,Benos Publishers (in Greek)

5.Brealey R., Myers S.,(1996), Principles of Corporate Finance, McGraw Hill Companies

6.Copeland T., Weston J.,(1983), Financial Theory and Corporate Practice, 3rd ed., Addison Wessley.

7.Fama E., Foundation of Finance, (1976),Basic Books, New York.

www.ft.com

www.economist.com

www.capital.gr

ww.euro2day.gr

www.naftemporiki.gr

PROJECT MANAGEMENT

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:

 In-class instruction and support (forum, chat) through the e-Class platform of PUAS.

Weekly Hours:  Lectures and Project Work- Workshops: 5
ECTS:  6
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Project Management is part of the Business Administration direction courses. It is an extension and specialization of the “Organization and Administration Ι & ΙΙ” core modules, with the basic axis of reference being the concept of project, administration processes and project management methods that use Information Technologies tools.

The module has been designed as an introduction to the IT principles, methods and tools that are used to plan, administrate and manage a project, with the purpose of minimizing fluctuations of the stated economic and time-schedule targets. By the end of the modules, which include lectures, assignments and lab work with the aid of open-source software packs, students will have grasped the importance of proper management and administration of a project and the definitive role of Information Technologies in a positive outcome. In addition to the knowledge and skills acquired, students will also be in a position to immediately start working as consultants or project assistant managers, with prospects for rapid advancement.

 

Upon successful completion of this module students will be able to:

•Distinguish basic and important features of projects, their relevance to general economic and operational targets and the principals of project life cycles.

•Utilize tools and tactics in order to successfully complete projects within time and budget limits.

•Use project management methodologies to determine basic elements such as the critical path, dependencies and a realistic timetable.

•Analyze and estimate the basic cost data for the project and their relation to the project’s time-schedule.

•Use hedging techniques to associate the cost, quality and implementation timeframe of a project in the best way possible.

•Implement statistic methods as to estimate the span of a project.

Module Description

Project Management – Basic Concepts

Planning – Programming - Testing

Methods of Scheduling Projects

The PERT/CRM Method

Fluctuation of a Project’s Duration

Project Duration in relation to Cost

Activity control - GANTT Diagram

Project Programming in relation to Fund Availability 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

I. On –going Evaluation by solving exercises on the whiteboard (20%)

Evaluation Objective: The understanding control of  the fundamentals of the course 

Evaluation Criteria: Comprehensiveness, accuracy, and critical evaluation

 

IΙ. Final Examination (40%) (Summative Evaluation) includes:

-Solving problems concerning time  and cost optimization of a project

-Short answer questions 

Evaluation Objective: The understanding control of the fundamentals of the course and control of the abilities about the planning of a project.

Evaluation Criteria: Comprehensiveness, accuracy, and critical evaluation.

 

ΙII. Laboratory Final Examination (40%): 

Concerns issues covered by laboratory lessons about the use of the MS-Project software for the planning and control a project. 

Evaluation Objective: Examination of students' progress in relation to learning outcomes, feedback and fine tuning of the laboratory lessons.

Evaluation Criteria: Comprehensiveness, accuracy, and critical evaluation.

Evaluation criteria are explicitly referred on the site of the course for each learning activity.

Recommended or required Bibliography

Recommended Book and Journal Article Resources:

 

•Shtub, A., Bard, J., & Globerson, S. (2005). Project Management: Processes, Methodologies, and Economics, 2nd ed. New York: Prentice Hall  

•Polizos S. (2004), Project Management, Methods and Techniques, Kritiki Pubs. (in Greek)

•Bruke R.,  (2002), Project Management, Design and Control Techniques Kritiki Pubs. (in Greek).

•Shtub A. Bard J. Globerson S. (2008) Project Management , Processes, Methodogy  and Tecnhicaland Economical, Epikentro Publishers. (in Greek).

•MS Project 2010, Kleidarithmos Publishers (in Greek).

•Harvey Maylor (2005), Project management , Kleidarithmos Publishers Διοίκηση Έργου (in Greek).

•A. Dimitriadis (2004), Project Management, Neon technologion Publishers (in Greek).

MARKET RESEARCH

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  In class
Weekly Hours:  Lectures: 3, Laboratory: 2
ECTS:  6
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

 

The objectives of the course are designed so that students   are able to:

Comprehend the potential of research and its relationship with its Marketing sectors.

•Analyze the basic research techniques to measure opinions, attitudes and choices of the customers.

•Apply research as a professional "tool". Students be able to   work together, in both in the formulation of research objectives and in the evaluation of research results.

•Integrate  the proper research method, depending on the subject which will  be investigated.

•Evaluate all modern methods for the development of qualitative and quantitative research, providing the necessary knowledge to form samples, to construct     questionnaires, to check the  questionnaires through pilot test, to conduct  surveys, to analyze the data gathered , and to evaluate and predict  research findings

Module Description

 

1. Discuss the role of market research within a business context

2. Identify and describe different research approaches

3. Develop a research plan

4. Describe various qualitative research methods

5. Design and administer a questionnaire

6. Analyse quantitative data

7. Construct a research report and present research findings

8. Conduct a qualitative interview

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final Examination 60%

Group Project (40%)

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Recommended Book and Journal Article Resources:

P. Kyriazopoulos- E. Samanta Introduction to Market Research (2009) Publisher: Synchrony Ekdotiki(in Greek)

Aaker A.,   Kumar V.  Day S., “Marketing Research”, Wiley, Publisher: 1995 

Churchill G., (2001) “Basic Marketing Research”, South-Western Thomson Learning, 2001.

Journal of Marketing Research (American Marketing Association) https://www.ama.org/publications/JournalOfMarketingResearch/Pages/current-issue.aspx

BUSINESS STRATEGY

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  In-Class
Weekly Hours:  Lectures and Workshops-Project Work: 6
ECTS:  6
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Purpose of the course is to introduce students to the concept of strategy, strategic thinking and the formulation and implementation of strategies by corporate entities.  Students will be exposed to various theoretical approaches of business strategy, the process of strategy formation and will be able to evaluate and choose the best strategy that fits the organization’s goals.  Special emphasis will be given to critical review of concepts and to analysis of case studies. 

 

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

•Recognize the importance of developing a business strategy 

•Identify the differences among theoretical approaches focusing on competitive advantage formation of corporate entities 

•Examine the conditions under which  firms based in Greece could develop and implement a competitive advantage in the industry sector of their operations. 

•Develop critical thinking via bibliographic review essay focusing on a theoretical concept. 

•Evaluate the effectiveness of various strategies through analysis of case studies 

Module Description

The course is organized around topics such as:

-Introduction to the concept and aspects of strategy 

-Theoretical approaches to business strategy 

-Relations with Stakeholders- strategic mission and corporate governance    

-Organizational culture and strategy  

-Strategy of competitive advantage at both the level of the business unit and the corporation as an entity.  

-Strategies of expansion in new products and markets 

-Internationalization strategy 

-Evaluation of strategies  

-Case studies 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Ι. Final Examination (65%) (Summative Evaluation) includes:

-Analysis of concepts pertaining to business strategy 

-Short answer questions

-    Problem solving 

Evaluation Objective: To understand the fundamentals of the course.

Evaluation Criteria: Comprehensiveness, accuracy, and critical evaluation.

 

ΙΙ. Individual Project (25%) (Summative Evaluation) includes: 

-  written work 

- public presentation  

Analysis of case study

Evaluation Objective: To examine students' skills and to enhance their capability for adapting concepts in the Greek context.

Evaluation Criteria: Degree of specifications' satisfaction, Categorization-organization-adaptation of material, rational thinking in developing best choice,  structure and clarity of written text and of presentation.

 

ΙII. Bibliographical Review Essay (10%) (Formative Evaluation)

Concerns theoretical concepts discussed  in lectures and course readings. 

Evaluation Objective: Examination of students' progress in relation to learning outcomes and capability to examine readings thoroughly and in a critical manner.

Evaluation Criteria: Accuracy, rational and critical thinking 

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Recommended Book and Journal Article Resources:

 

Books

•Johnson Gerry, Scholes Kevan, Whittington Richard (2009). Fundamentals of Strategy , Pearson Education Limited. (translated in Greek edition, 2011)  

•Papadakis V. (2012) Business Strategy , Volume  Α,  6th editions Benos Publishers, Athens (in Greek) . 

•Papadakis V.. (2002) Business Strategy-Case Studies , Volume  Β, Benos Publishers,  Athens (in Greek). 

 

Selected articles from the following journals:  

•Academy of Management Journal

•Administrative Science Quarterly 

•Business Horizons  

•Business Strategy Review 

•Harvard Business Review

•Journal of Business Strategy 

•Journal of International Management 

•Journal of Management Studies 

•Management International Review 

•Management Science 

•Organization 

•Organization Studies 

•Scandinavian Journal of Management

•Sloan Management Review 

•Strategic Decision

•Strategic Management Journal  

LOGISTICS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  In-Class
Weekly Hours:  Lectures and Workshops-Project Work: 5
ECTS:  6
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

This course examines the role of logistics in the supply chain within a focal firm as well as between organisations linked within a given supply network. Topics cover issues such as introduction to the basic terms of logistics, distribution and transportation alternatives, the connection between logistics and marketing, the estimation of value and costs in logistics, sourcing and supply management, supply chain planning and control strategies and logistics future challenges and opportunities. This course also surveys operations research models and techniques developed for a variety of problems arising in logistical planning of production systems. Students will get a clear idea of the expanding role of logistics in business today. The will also be familiar with the principles and processes of logistics as a strategic choice in supply chain management.

Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

•Understand the structure of supply chains and the different ways through which supply chains can become competitive in the market 

•Explain how to use the levers of the logistics strategy to redefine the points necessary to make this harmonization

•Analyse the importance of the term “value creation” and to propose actions in the field of management of logistics costs towards the creation of value

•Distinguish the forces shaping international logistics in a global market

•Assess accurately the risks occurred due to loss of focus on the satisfaction of end-customer demand  

•Produce and combine effectively the options available for managing inventory and orders per case 

•Develop in the right way the process of organizing and conducting the proceedings relating to the transport and distribution

Module Description

•Introduction and overview of the course contents 

•Logistics and the Supply Chain 

•Material flow and information flow 

•Competitive advantage through logistics 

•Logistics strategy 

•The marketing perspective 

•Market segmentation and demand profiling

•Quality of customer service

•Setting priorities for logistics strategy

•Where does the value in the context of logistics come from 

•How can logistics costs be represented 

•Activity Based Costing (ABC) 

•Supply chain operations reference model (SCOR) 

•Drivers and logistics implications of internationalization on 

•The tendency towards internationalization

•The challenges of international logistics and installation location 

•Organising for international logistics 

•Reverse logistics 

•Managing for risk readiness

•Corporate social responsibility in the supply chain 

•Analysis of the transportation and products distribution system 

•The transport system: organization, institutional framework, liberalization of the transport market and impact on logistics processes 

•Transport and transportation mean selection criteria

•Distribution and transportation systems standards

•Methods for solving transportation and distribution problems 

•Methods for solving production scheduling and resource allocation problems 

•Supply chain planning and control 

•Coordination in supply chains

•The interconnection between P-D parameters in Logistics   

•Future challenges and opportunities in Logistics 

•Supply management and Logistics 

•Rationalising and segmenting the supply base 

•Procurement technologies

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Language Assessment: Greek

Final Examination (100%) (Summative Evaluation) includes: 

-Open questions on various issues - approaches in logistics functions. 

•Evaluation Objective: The examination of knowledge concerning the fundamentals of the course.

•Evaluation Criteria: Accuracy, completeness, clarity and critical approach of responses

 

-Modelling problems related to the selection of optimum solutions in supply chain management 

•Evaluation Objective: The examination of understanding on how to model logistics problems.

•Evaluation Criteria: Proper implementation methodologies and practices in problems modelling, the degree of analysis the proposed model, the presentation of the proposed solution.

Recommended or required Bibliography

Recommended Books:

1. Alan Harisson & Remko van Hoek, “Logistics Management and Strategy: Competing Through the Supply Chain”, FT Press, 2011

2. Μartin Christofer. “Logistics &  Supply Chain management” , Pearson Education Limited, 2005

3. G. Prastakos. Management Science: operational decisions in the Information Society,  Stamoulis, 2000 (in Greek)

 

Journal Article Resources:

1. International Journal of Logistics Management – Elsevier

2. International Journal of Logistics Systems and Management – Interscience

3. Journal of Business Logistics - Wiley

E BUSINESS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  In-Class
Weekly Hours:  Lectures, Workshops and Laboratory Exercises: 5
ECTS:  6
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The aim of the course is to introduce students to: (1) the fundamental principles of e-Business and e-Commerce and the role of Management, (2) the underlying used technologies with emphasis on Internet Technologies, and (3) the application of tools and services to the development of small scale e-Commerce applications.

 

Upon successful completion of the course students will be able to:

•Recognize the impact of Information and Communication technologies, especially of the Internet in business operations

•Recognize the fundamental principles of e-Business and e-Commerce

•Distinguish the role of Management in the context of e-Business and e-Commerce

•Explain the added value, risks and barriers in the adoption of e-Business and e-Commerce

•Examine applications of e-Commerce in relation to the applied strategic 

•Develop and publish web pages using HTML5, CSS3 and Javascript

•Use tools and services of the internet in the development of a virtual e-commerce site

Module Description

The course is organized around topics such as:

•The impact of ICT in contemporary business operations

•e-Commerce and e-Business

•e-Business Challenges

•Risks and barriers in the adoption of e-business environment

•The role of Management in e-Commerce and e-Business

•Business models in e-Commerce

•Strategic Development in e-Commerce 

•Internet Technologies and Applications 

•Internet standards

•Management of e-Business infrastructure

•The future of internet infrastructure

•Web services, SaaS, and Service-Oriented Architecture 

•Social Networking, WEB 2.0, WEB 3.0

•Mobile commerce (m-commerce)

•Social and Legal factors

•Data Privacy protection and trust in e-Commerce

•Environmental Issues

•E-government

•Technological Innovation and Evaluation of Technology

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Ι. Final Examination (50%) (Summative Evaluation) includes:

-Multiple choice questions or true/false questions

-Short answer questions

-     Case Study 

Evaluation Objective: To understand the fundamentals of the course.

Evaluation Criteria: Comprehensiveness, accuracy, and critical evaluation.

 

ΙΙ. Group Project (40%) (Summative Evaluation): 

Development of an e-Commerce Site.

Evaluation Objective: To examine students' skills in internet tools and services and to enhance students' teamwork skills.

Evaluation Criteria: Functionality of the application, the degree of specifications' satisfaction, user-interface, organization and management of teamwork project and presentation.

 

ΙII. Multiple Choice Test (10%)(Formative Evaluation)

Concerns issues covered by lectures. 

Evaluation Objective: Examination of students' progress in relation to learning outcomes, feedback and fine tuning of the course lectures.

Evaluation Criteria: Comprehensiveness, accuracy, and critical evaluation.

Evaluation criteria are explicitly referred on the site of the course for each learning activity.

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Recommended Book and Journal Article Resources:

Books

•Chaffey, Dave, (2011). E-business and e-commerce management : strategy, implementation, and practice, 5th ed., ISBN-10: 0273752014, ISBN-13: 978-0273752011, 

•Pollalis G., Yannakopoulos D., (2007). Electronic Commerce, Stamoulis Publishing, Athens (in Greek).

•White M., Bruton G., (2010). Strategic Management of Technology and Innovation, KRITIKI Publishing, Athens (in Greek).

•Efrain Turban, Jae Lee, David King, Michael Chung, (2008). Electronic Commerce: Principles-Evolution-Strategic from the scope of Manager, Gkiourdas M. Publishing, Athens (in Greek).

•Arsenides, Paschopoulos, Skaltsas, (2007). Electronic Commerce, KLEIDARITHMOS Publishing, Athens (in Greek).

 

Internet resources:

•HTML Tutorials from w3schools URL: http://www.w3schools.com/html/ 

•Web Fundamentals, URL: http://www.codecademy.com/tracks/web 

•Dr. Kevin Floyd, (2013). XHTML/CSS Tutorial, URL: http://www.merlot.org/merlot/viewMaterial.htm?id=451821 

•Smart Webby Inc., (2013). Web Development Resources, URL: http://www.merlot.org/merlot/viewMaterial.htm?id=77936

 

Selected articles from the following journals:

•Electronic Commerce Research, Springer.

•International Journal of Electronic Commerce (IJEC), M.E. Sharpe Inc.

•Electronic Commerce Research and Applications, Elsevier.

•International Journal of Electronic Business, Interscience Publishers. 

8th Semester

DISSERTATION

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  
Weekly Hours:  
ECTS:  
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

 

Module Description

 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

 

Recommended or required Bibliography

 

PLACEMENT

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  
Weekly Hours:  
ECTS:  
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

 

Module Description

 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

 

Recommended or required Bibliography

 

Area of Tourism and Hospitality Management

1st Semester

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION I

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  In-Class
Weekly Hours:  Lectures - Project Work, 4
ECTS:  4
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The aim of this course is to introduce students to the philosophy and principles of Organisation and Business Administration as well as to provide them with the underlying principles and techniques of Organisation and Business Administration with emphasis on their application to organizations.

 

Upon the successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Evaluate the contribution of the Organization and Business Administration to an organisation.
  • Describe the components of the business environment.
  • Analyse the impact of the business environment on administrative management.
  • Understand what Organization and Business Administration is and the role a manager plays in an organization.
  • Recognize the importance of planning and control within an organization, and the tools required to effectively do this.
  • Develop a systematic approach to identifying business opportunities.
  • Recognize the necessary functional areas needed to run a successful business: marketing, finance/accounting, operations/productions, sales and human resources.
  • Develop the necessary skills to become a “good” communicator and “inspirational” leader.

 

 

Module Description

 

The course is organized around topics such as:

 

 

  • Business Categories.
  • Organizational patterns.
  • Multinational Corporations - Business Coalitions.
  • The Business Environment.
  • Concept of environment.
  • The external business environment.
  • The internal business environment.
  • The Business Social Responsibility.
  • Administration and Management.
  • The evolution of management thinking.
  • Business Objectives.
  • Management by Objectives
  • The systems theory
  • Programming.
  • The Concept Programme
  • The stages of planning
  • Basic types of programs
  • Categories programs in terms of time.
  • Decision Making
  • Types of decisions.
  • The conditions of making
  • The stages of the decision-making process.
  • Leadership and Human Capital.

 

 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

 

Language Assessment: Greek

 

Final Examination (50%) (Summative Evaluation) includes: Multiple choice questions or true/false questions. Short answer questions and problems solve. The examination would take place with open books and notes.

 

  • Evaluation Objective: To understand the fundamentals of the course.
  • Evaluation Criteria: Comprehensiveness, accuracy, and critical evaluation.

 

Group Project (40%) (Summative Evaluation): Company selection and the presentation of data such as: purpose, mission, vision, internal and external environment, organizational structure.

 

  • Evaluation Objective: To examine students' skills and to enhance students' teamwork skills.
  • Evaluation Criteria: Functionality of the project, the degree of specifications' satisfaction, organization and management of teamwork project and presentation.

 

Oral Presentation (10%):

 

  • Evaluation Objective: The presentation of teamwork project.
  • Evaluation Criteria: The use of professional presentation software, conclusions and recommendation, the language use, correct tone, the completeness of answers to questions

 

Evaluation criteria are explicitly referred on the site of the course for each learning activity.

 

Recommended or required Bibliography

 

In Greek

 

  • Tzortzakis K., Tzortzaki A., (2007), Business Administration - Management The New Age, Rosili Publications. (In Greek).
  • Robbins Stephen P., Decenzo David A., Coulter Mary, (2012), Business Management - Principles and Applications, Kritiki Publications. (In Greek).
  • Kefis, V. (2005), Integrated Management, 1st Edition, Kritiki Publications. (In Greek).
  • Williams K. & Johnson, B., (2005), Introduction to Management, Kritiki Publications. (In Greek).
  • Bourantas D., (2001), Management, Benos Publications. (In Greek).
  • Chitiris L. (2006), Management: Business Administration, Interbooks Publications. (In Greek).
  • Cholevas D (2004), Principles of Organization and Management, Interbooks Publications. (In Greek).
  • Prastacos, G. (2002), Management Science, Stamoulis Publications. (In Greek).

 

In Foreign Language

 

  • Michael A.,Hitt, Stewart, Black, Lyman W.,Porter  (2008), Management , Pearson Education (US)
  • Gary, Dessler (2003), Management, Pearson Education (US)
  • Stephen P., Robbins, Mary, Coulter (2007), Management, Pearson Education (US)
  • Allen I. Α., (1988), Management and Organization, McGraw - Hill, New York.
  • Bateman, T., Zeithami, C. and Snell, S., (2001), Management, McGraw-Hill Education.
  • Jones, G., (2008), Organizational Theory, Design and Change, Pearson Education.
  • Hunger, J. and Wheelen, T., (2007), Strategic Management and Business Policy, Pearson Education.
  • Friend, G. and Zehle, S., (2004), Guide to Business Planning, The Economist in association with Profile Books Ltd, U.K.

 

Internet resources:

  • http://www.epistimonikomarketing.gr 
  • http://www.ease.gr
  • http://www.paratiritirio.gr
  • http://www.euroinfo.gr
  • http://www.sev.org.gr
  • http://www.efqm.org
  • http://www.hba.gr
  • http://www.iobe.gr
  • http://www.ase.gr
  • http://www.statistics.gr
  • http://www.uhc.gr

Selected articles from the following journals:

 

  • Business Process Management Journal – Emerald.
  • Management Development Review – Emerald.
  • Journal of Management History – Emerald.
  • Journal of Management Development – Emerald.
  • European Management Journal – Elsevier.
  • Information and Management – Elsevier.
  • International Business Review – Elsevier.
  • Journal of International Management – Elsevier.
  • Journal of Business Venturing – Elsevier.

 

MICROECONOMICS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: In-Class
Weekly Hours: Lectures and Workshops-Project Work, 4
ECTS:  4
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Microeconomics is the study of economic actions of individuals and well defined groups of individuals. The theories of individual behavior, price determination, perfect competition, oligopoly, consumers' behavior are the main topics which are examined and analyzed. A mathematical background is necessary as it enlarges the economist's tools and widens the range of possible inferences from initial assumptions.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

•understand the enterprises’ operation

•understand the operation techniques of the enterprises and the formation of the products’ prices

•analyze the consequences of the financial parameters’ alterations on the enterprises’ operation

•analyze the complexity of economic variables with the use of social-economic exercises and the help of diagrams.

 

Module Description

The course is organized around topics such as: 

1. An  Introduction to Microeconomics

 2. Consumer behavior

 3. Theory of Demand and Supply

 4. Production and Cost

 5. Perfect Competition

 6. Imperfect Competition

 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

I. Final Examination (80%), which includes multiple choice questions or/and topics for elaboration

 

II. Individual Project (20%) 

Recommended or required Bibliography

Georgakopoulos T., Lianos T., (2007). Introduction to Political Economy,  Benos Publishing (in Greek)

•Kotti G., Kotti A., (200). Contemporary Microeconomic,  Benos Publishing (in Greek)

•Samuelson P., Nordhaus W., (2000). Economic, Volume A, Papazisis Publishing (in Greek)

•Krugman P., Wells R., (2011), Microeconomic, Epikentro Publishing (in Greek)

•Ferguson K., (2004). Basic Principles of Economic Theory, Kritiki Publishing (in Greek)

•Mankiw G., (2001), Principles of Economic, Volume Α, Τυπωθήτω Publishing (in Greek)

•Heilbroner R., (2000). Philosophers of the Economic World,  Kritiki Publishing (in Greek)

•Becker G., Posner R., (2009), Economic insights, from marriage to terrorism, The University of Chicago Press

•Mankiw G., (2006). Principles of Microeconomics, Thompson South-Western

•McConnell C., Brue S., Flynn S., (2012). Microecomics, McGraw-Hill

 

Internet Sources

https://www.coursera.org/

https://www.udacity.com/

https://webcast.grnet.gr/

http://www.blod.gr/default.aspx  

 

 

PRINCIPLES OF FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  In-Class and Lab
Weekly Hours:  Lectures and Workshops-Project Work, 5 (3+2 LAB)
ECTS:  6
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

 

The main aim of this course is to introduce and analyze to students the principles of financial accounting, the most important financial statements, the accounting process and its use in business administration.

 

Upon successful completion of the course students will be able to:

•understand the role, the importance and the contribution of Financial Accounting in the organization and management of enterprises

•know the basic elements of Tax Code Transactions, General Accounting Plan and the International Accounting Standards

•understand the principles of Accounting

•understand the Accounting Records and the Financial Statements

•handle accounting records and balance sheets and income statements

•analyze and handle the accounts of both balance sheets and income statements

Module Description

-Accounting as an information system. The use and users of accounting information

-Accounting principles – accounting history – accounting standards.

-Regarding Annual reports (assets, liabilities, inventories, revenues, expenses

-Double entry system

-Business transactions recording and posting

-Transactions reporting and analysis

-Balance sheet – Profit and loss statement

-Measuring the financial results

-Depreciation

 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

 

I. Final Examination (80%)

- Critical thinking questions

- Transactions Recording, exercises 

- Evaluation on reporting problems 

ΙΙ. Group Project / Teamwork (20%)

 

 

 

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Papadeasς, P., (2011),  Financial Accounting Information, Athens (in Greek)

2.Lekarakou K., (2012), Financial Accounting Ι, Athens (in Greek)

3.Mpallas A., Hevas D., (2008), Financial Accounting, Mpenos Publishing, Athens (in Greek)

4.Needles, B.,Powers, M. Croson, S (2008), Financial and Managerial Accounting, Houghton Mifflin Co, Boston.

5.Needles, Andrson, Caldwell (1996), Principles of Accounting, Houghton Mifflin Co, Boston.

6.Meigs, W. Meigs, R. (1988), Accounting, the Bases of Business Decisions, Papazisis Publishing, Athens (in Greek)

 

PRIVATE LAW

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  
Weekly Hours:  
ECTS:  
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

 

Module Description

 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

 

Recommended or required Bibliography

 

FINANCIAL MATHEMATICS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  In-Class
Weekly Hours:  Lectures, Laboratory exercises, case studies, 5
ECTS:  6
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The aim of the course is to introduce students to the basic concepts of interest and interest rate. Moreover the student will learn to apply basic rules of differential and integral calculus in financial functions. 

Upon successful completion of the course students should be able to:

•develop applications of the techniques of simple and compound interest on financial -economic transactions

•recognize the  importance of annuities and must be able to calculate the present and final value of lapsed, advanced and Enduring annuity

•use basic principles of differential and calculus in financial functions and interpret the results

•use basic principles of integral  calculus in order to solve economic problems and interpret the results

 

Module Description

Rate, simple interest.

Bill replacement 

Compound Interest

Annuities 

Definition derivative

Study economic functions through derivatives

Rules of integration

Usage of integrals in order to study economic problems

 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

I. Final Written Exam (80%) (Summative Evaluation) includes:

-Multiple choice questions or true/false questions

-Short answer questions 

Evaluation Objective: To understand the fundamentals of the course.

Evaluation Criteria: Comprehensiveness, accuracy, and critical evaluation.

 

 

II. Multiple Choice Test (20%) (Formative Evaluation)

Concerns issues covered by lectures. 

Evaluation Objective: Examination of students' progress in relation to learning outcomes, feedback and fine tuning of the course lectures.

Evaluation Criteria: Comprehensiveness, accuracy, and critical evaluation.

 

 

Evaluation criteria are explicitly referred on the site of the course for each learning activity.

 

Recommended or required Bibliography

REFERENCES

Chiang A., Wainwright K., (2005) Magraw Hill Company

Cuthbertson K. (1996) Quantitative Financial Economics stocks, bonds and foreign exchange Wiley

Hands D Wade (2004) Introductory Mathematical Economics Oxford University Press 

Martin A.,  Norman B.,  (2008). Mathematics for Economics and Finance Campridge university press 

Sydsaeter K. and Hammond  P., (2002).  Essential Mathematics for economic analysis Prentise Hall 

 

JOURNALS

Journal of financial mathematics

Journal of financial economis and mathematics

Siam journal of financial mathematics

Mathematical finance

 

PRINCIPLES OF TOURISM

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  In-Class
Weekly Hours:  Lectures and Workshops-Project Work, 4 (3+1)
ECTS:  5
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The aim of the course is to enable students to recognize tourism as a social and economic phenomenon, to get to know its historical development/evolution and those factors which contributed to its creation. In addition, for students to conceive the significance of tourism and its relation with culture, together with an acquaintance with the related institutions (public and private). 

The course also aims to illustrate the importance of tourism for a country’s development/growth.

 

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

•Recognize tourism as a social and economic phenomenon.

•Be familiar with the historical evolution of the Tourism phenomenon.

•Analyze the tourism phenomenon as a complex phenomenon, whose dimensions refer to a social, economic, cultural but also environmental level.

•Analyze and explain the typology of tourism.

•Be familiar with the institutions (national and international, state and private) having competences in the tourism sector.

•Understand the multifarious aspects of tourism and its impacts to a country or a region.

 

Module Description

The course is organized around topics such as:

•Tourism and introductory concepts of tourism (definition, measurement attempts)

•Nature and the characteristics of tourism industry.

•Evolution of tourism over time.

•Tourism typology and distinctions.

•Tourism Institutions.

•Tourism and culture.

•Cultural heritage and enhancement of cultural-industrial heritage as a key component of tourism development.

•Techniques and policies of tourism management. 

 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Ι. Final Examination (80%) 

includes:

-Multiple choice questions 

-Topics for elaboration

-     Problem solving (issues concerning tourism)

-     Comparative evaluation of learning outcomes

 

ΙΙ. Teamwork (20%) 

 

Recommended or required Bibliography

Book resources:

•Moira Polyxeni & Parthenis Sp. (2011). Cultural-Industrial Tourism, Anoikti Vivliothiki Publishing, Athens (in Greek).

•Lickorich, L. and Jenkins, C., (2004). An Introduction to Tourism, ed, Kritiki, Athens.

•Igoumenakis N. and Kravaritis K. – Lytras P. (1999). Introduction to Tourism, Interbooks Publishing, Athens, (in Greek)

Journals

•Annals of Tourism Research

•Annals of Leisure Research

•Journal of Travel Research 

•Tourism Management, Research, Policies, Practice

2nd Semester

FINANCIAL STATEMENT ANALYSIS

 

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: In-Class 
Weekly Hours: Lectures and Workshops-Project Work, 4 
ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The analysis and the interpretation of the accounting information which is included in financial statements is the main purpose of this course. In particular, cash flow, profitability, effectiveness, capital structure, liquidity, evidence for financial distress of firms.

 

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  • Understand and manage the content of financial statements

  • Analyze accounting information using ratios

  • Use financial methods for the prediction of financial distress

  • Develop financial statements

  • Evaluate the credit worthiness of firms processing accounting data

  • Analyze firm’s cash flow

Module Description

The course is organized around topics such as:

-Demand for accounting information which is reported in financial statements

-Interpretation of the financial reporting information

-Annual and interim reports

-Cash flow analysis

-Evaluation of liquidity, capital structure, solvency, profitability and efficiency

-Bankruptcy, Altman and Olson models

-Capital markets and accounting information

 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Ι. Final Examination (80%)

  - Short answer questions

  - Critical thinking questions

  - Exercises on business performance analysis

  - Case study. 

ΙΙ. Group Project (20%)

 

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.KANTZOS, K., 2002. Financial Statements Analysis. Athens: Interbooks Publishing. (in Greek)

2.NIARCHOS N., 1997. Financial Statements Analysis. Athens: Stamoulis Publishing. (in Greek) 

3.PALEPU K., HEALY P., BERNARD V., 2004. Business Analysis and Valuation using Financial Statements. Ohio: Thomson – South Western Publishing. 

4.PENMAN S., 2010. Financial Statement Analysis and Security Valuation. New York: McGraw Hill Publishing.

 

BUSINESS STATISTICS I

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: In-Class
Weekly Hours: Lectures, Laboratory, case studies, 4 
ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The aim of the course is to introduce the students in basic principles of Probabilities and  descriptive statistics. 

Upon successful completion of the course students should be able to:

•calculate and interpret descriptive measures on a collected data set

•understand the basic concepts of Probability  Theory and especially the connection of Probability Theory with the statistical inference

•determine the different types of random variables in a database in order to be analyzed

•investigate the relationship between economic variables using correlation and regression techniques

•apply  methods of descriptive statistics and regression analysis using statistical packages 

Module Description

Definition of Probability through Laplace.

 Random variables 

Discrete distributions (binomial, geometric Poisson)

 Continuous distributions with emphasis on knowledge of the normal distribution and the Central Limit Theorem

Descriptive Statistics with emphasis on understanding the charts but also on the interpretation of the descriptive measures.

Correlation and linear regression between two variables. 

The study goodness  fit of the linear regression model through the study of the residuals.

 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

I. Final Examination (50%) (Summative Evaluation) includes:

-Multiple choice questions or true/false questions

-Short answer questions 

Evaluation Objective: To understand the fundamentals of the course.

Evaluation Criteria: Comprehensiveness, accuracy, and critical evaluation.

 

 

ΙI. Multiple Choice Test (10%) (Formative Evaluation)

Concerns issues covered by lectures. 

Evaluation Objective: Examination of students' progress in relation to learning outcomes, feedback and fine tuning of the course lectures.

Evaluation Criteria: Comprehensiveness, accuracy, and critical evaluation.

 

ΙV. Laboratory Exercises (40%) (Summative Evaluation): 

Concerns issues covered by laboratory lessons. 

Evaluation Objective: Examination of students' progress in relation to learning outcomes, feedback and fine tuning of the laboratory lessons.

Evaluation Criteria: Comprehensiveness, accuracy, and critical evaluation.

 

Evaluation criteria are explicitly referred on the site of the course for each learning activity.

 

Recommended or required Bibliography

DeGroot M H, Schervish M J., (2001), Probability and Statistics, 3rd ed., Addison Wesley

•Johnson R.A:, Bhattacharyya G.K., (2001), Statistics: Principles and Methods. John Wiley and Sons

•Montgomery D C., Peck E A., Vining G. G, (2001), Introduction to Linear Regression Analysis, 3rd ed., Wiley-Interscience.

JOURNALS

•Annals of Probability

•Statistics and Probability Letters

•Journal of statistics and probabilities

•Discrete Mathematics

MACROECONOMICS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: In-Class 
Weekly Hours:  Lectures, Workshops, Project Work, 4
ECTS: 5
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The course aims at the description and analysis of current subjects of macroeconomics. The target is the students’ information on current aspects concerning macroeconomics, as well as on problems emerging in Greek economy. The use of simple examples and diagrams will help students understand the financial mechanisms used in the understanding of certain phenomena. 

Upon successful completion of the course students will be able to:

a)understand how the macroeconomic system of economy functions

b)apply mechanisms of economic thought for the selection of alternative solutions to the economic problems

c)demonstrate a comprehensive view of economic policy

d)describe the Keynesian approach to money supply

 

Module Description

 

The course is organized around topics such as:

1. Macroeconomic vs Microeconomic analysis

2. National Product and Income

3. Consumption and Saving

4. Income and Employment

5. Multipliers

6. Investments

7. Fiscal Policy and Income

8. The Quantity Theory of Money

9. Monetary Policy

10. Inflation

 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final Examination (75%)

- Short answer questions

- Questions of solving fiscal problems. 

 

Individual Project (25%)

 

Recommended or required Bibliography

Books:

-Georgakopoulos, T., Lianos, T., et.al. (2007). “Introduction to Political Economy”, Mpenos Publishing (in Greek)

-Kottis, G., Kotti, A.,(2000). “Contemporary Macroeconomics”, Mpenos Publishing (in Greek)

-Samuelson, P., Nordhaus, W. (2000).“Economics”, Volume B, Papazisis Publishing (in Greek)

-Krugman, P., Wells, P. (2011).“Macroeconomics”, Epikentro Publishing (in Greek)

-Ferguson, K. (2004).“Basic Principles of Economic Theory”, Kritiki Publishing (in Greek)

-Heilbroner, R.,Thurrow, P. (1984).“Understanding Macroeconomics”, Papazisis Publishing (in Greek)

-Mankiw, G. (2001).“Principles of Economics”, Volume Β, Tipothito Publishing (in Greek)

-Galbraith, (2000).“A Journey to Economic World”, Kaktos Publishing (in Greek)

-MarronD. (Ed.) (2011).“Economic Theories That Influenced Humanity”, Klidarithmos Publishing (in Greek)

-McConnell, C., Brue,S., Flynn, S.(2008).“Macroecomics”, McGraw-Hill.

 

Internet

https://www.coursera.org/

https://www.udacity.com/

https://webcast.grnet.gr/

http://www.blod.gr/default.aspx

 

PUBLIC LAW

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: In-Class 
Weekly Hours: Lectures and Workshops-Project Work, 5 (3+2) 
ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

 

The course is concerned with the whole area of public law with an emphasis on key public law rules, regulations, and procedures (including constitutional, administrative, procedural, fiscal, financial, environmental law). Knowledge of Public Law is indispensable to the operations and management of business entities.

Upon successful completion of the course students will be able to: 

 

  •  record the principles, rules and organization and functioning of the state in general and the Public Administration 
  •  identify and record the limits and conditions of Public Administration vis-a-vis businesses and citizens
  •  identify the procedures that companies are obliged to follow vis-a-vis Public Administration 
  •  distinguish and analyze the extrajudicial and judicial protection of businesses and citizens from illegal acts of the Administration
  •  understand the environment upon which a firm is called to operate given that it is asked to conform to public law requirements, obligations and procedures 
  •  assess the conditions set by the administration for business activity and its growth potential 

 

 

Module Description

 

  • Details of the concept of state 
  • The state organs and their competencies 
  • On Fundamental Rights 
  • Basic principles of administrative law and administrative procedure 
  • Administrative offices and exercise administrative responsibility 
  • Administrative history: types, production and administrative procedure, temporal power, recall
  • Controlling administrative operations: administrative, judicial 
  • The organization of public administration 
  • Selection of topics of special administrative law (especially administrative, procedural, fiscal, financial environmental law) relating to undertakings

 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

 

Final Examination (50%) The final exam includes: 

multiple choice questions and sort essays

 

Individual Project (15%) and Group Project(15%)

 

Oral Presentation (20%)

Problem Solving problems and Case Study Analysis

 

Recommended or required Bibliography

Books

Koimtzoglou, J. (2005), Elements of Public Law, Sakkoulas Athens – Thessaloniki (in Greek)

Poulis, P. (2010), Introduction to Public Law and institutions,  P.N.Sakkoulas Publications (in Greek)

Chrysanthakis, C. (2007), Lectures on Constitutional Law, Nomiki Bibliothiki (in Greek)

Chrysanthakis, C. (2006), Lectures Administrative Law, Nomiki Bibliothiki (in Greek) 

Spiliotopoulos , E. (2011), Manual Administrative Law, 1st vol., Nomiki Bibliothiki (in Greek)

Elliot, M., Thomas, R. (2011), Public Law, Oxford University Press.

 

Related Journals

Theory & Practice Administrative Law  - Nomiki Bibliothiki

Inspection of Public & Administrative Law 

Journal of Administrative Law  - Sakoulas Athens-Thessaloniki

Administrative Trial  -  Sakoulas Athens-Thessaloniki

 

INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER SCIENCE AND PROGRAMMING

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: In-Class 
Weekly Hours: Lectures, Workshops and Laboratory Exercises, 4 
ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

 

The aim of the course is to introduce students to the scientific field of informatics and especially to computer programming. Students will learn the fundamentals of programming through a modern high level programming language which combines features of object-oriented programming and event-driven programming in a graphical user interface. The ultimate goal is for the students to understand the way in which a program leverages the underlying computer within the framework of the management of an organization.

 

After completing this course, students will be able to:

•Explain the structure of a computing system 

•Explain the process of creating and executing a program in a computing system

•Create small-scale programs to solve simple practical problems 

•Distinguish the role of both the functional part of a program and the part used to interface with the user 

•Use objects of the programming language and especially those for creating the graphical user interface of the application

•Manage errors that may occur during the runtime of the application 

Module Description

 

The course is organized around topics such as:

•Introduction to Informatics 

•The Function of Computer 

•Data Representation and Coding

•Algorithm and Program 

•Introduction to Programming Language 

•Flow Control of a Program 

•Procedures and Functions 

•Tables and Applications 

•Files and Error Management 

•Introduction to Object Oriented Programming 

•Graphical User-Interface Objects

•Design of the Application

 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

 

Ι. Final Examination (40%) (Summative Evaluation) includes:

-Multiple choice questions or true/false questions

-Short answer questions 

-Solve simple problems 

Evaluation Objective: To understand the fundamentals of the course.

Evaluation Criteria: Comprehensiveness, accuracy, and critical evaluation.

 

ΙΙ. Group Project (30%) (Summative): 

Students are asked to work in groups and develop small-scale programs in the Lab. Teacher assess the ability of students to give operational solutions.

Evaluation Objective: To examine the ability to create simple programs to solve practical problems.

Evaluation Criteria: The degree of use of the elements of the programming language, the functionality of the program, the quality of the given solution.

 

IΙΙ. Individual On-line Test (20%) (Summative): 

Students are asked to answer in 3 on-line tests with multiple choice questions at specific periods in the labs.

Evaluation Objective: The degree of comprehension of the elements of the programming language. 

 

ΙV. Individual On-line Test (10%) (Formative Evaluation)

Concerns issues covered by lectures. The test is done on-line at the end of each topic through the Course Management System. Students are allowed to repeat the test more than 1 times.

Evaluation Objective: Examination of students' progress in relation to learning outcomes, feedback and fine tuning of the course lectures.

Evaluation Criteria: Comprehensiveness, accuracy, and critical evaluation.

 

Evaluation criteria are explicitly referred on the site of the course for each learning activity.

 

Recommended or required Bibliography

 

Books

•Halvorson Michael, (2010). Microsoft Visual Basic 2010 Step by Step, KLIDARITHMOS Publishing, Athens (in Greek)

•Deitel, Paul J., Deitel, Harvey M., (2010). Visual Basic 2010 Programming, GIOURDAS M., Publishing (in Greek)

•D. Kytagias, I. Psaromiligkos, (2004). VISUAL BASIC Από τη Θεωρία… στην Πράξη, DIROS Publishing (in Greek)

•Beekman, George, Quinn, Michael J., (2008). Introduction to Informatics, GIOURDAS M., Publishing, ISBN10: 9605125358  (in Greek)

Internet resources:

•Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 Express Edition  

http://www.visualstudio.com/en-us/downloads#d-2010-express 

•MSDN Library for Visual Studio 2010 

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd831853(v=vs.100).aspx

•A Guide to Algorithm Development, Manos Karvounis, Department of Computer Science, University of Athens: http://cgi.di.uoa.gr/~ip/Odigos.pdf 

•Ancient Greek Computer's Inner Workings Deciphered, National Geographic: http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2006/11/061129-ancient-greece.html 

•How to Design Programs - An Introduction to Computing and Programming, MIT Press: http://www.htdp.org/2003-09-26/Book/ 

•MIT 6.00 Introduction to Computer Science and Programming, Fall 2008, Youtube Videos in: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k6U-i4gXkLM

Selected articles from the following journals:

•Programming and Computer Software, Springer.

•Science of Computer Programming, Elsevier.

•Information and Software Technology, Elsevier.

•IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering, IEEE Computer Society. 

TOURISM POLICY

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: In-Class 
Weekly Hours: Lectures and Workshops-Project Work, 5 (3+2) 
ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

 

It is the key introductory course concerning the exercise of communication and tourism policies in tourism. The aim of the course’s content is to introduce students to issues concerning tourism and communication policies, make them familiar with the structure and competences of institutions practicing tourism policies in a European level (public and private), introduce them to a comparative analysis of their actions in the field of tourism and policies creating a tourism identity. 

Upon successful completion of the course students will be able to:

•Recognize the importance of tourism-communication policies in order to create tourism flows in a country.

•Understand the content of tourism policy.

•Analyze the arguments for the existence of a country’s tourism policy and tourism identity.

•Understand the framework, characteristics and competences of national institutions of tourism. 

•Understand and analyze the forms of government intervention in tourism policy and the configuration of tourism identity.

•Understand and analyze tourism demand.

•Use the appropriate tools, if applicable, to practice tourism policy.

 

Module Description

 The course is organized around topics such as:

•Tourism and tourism policy.

•The public institution of tourism policy of the EU’s member-states.

•Tourism-communication policy.

•Tourism-communication identity.

•Policy actions for the “communication” of various forms of tourism.

•The communication-tourism policy of EU’s member-states.

 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Ι. Final Examination (80%) 

includes:

-Multiple choice questions 

-Topics for elaboration

-     Problem solving (issues concerning tourism)

 

ΙΙ. Group Project (20%) 

 

Recommended or required Bibliography

 Book resources:

•Mylonopoulos, D. – Kontoudaki, Aik. (2011). “Communication policy in the Public Sector of Tourism”, ed. Nomiki Vivliothiki, Athens (in Greek).

•Tsartas, P. (2010). Greek Tourism Development, ed. Kritiki, Athens (in Greek)

Journals

•Annals of Tourism Research

•Annals of Leisure Research

•Journal of Travel Research 

•Tourism Management, Research, Policies, Practice

3rd Semester

PRINCIPLES OF FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT

 }

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: In-Class 
Weekly Hours: Lectures and Workshops-Project Work, 5 
ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The aim of the course is to introduce students to the theory and practice of Finance. It also aims to provide the key elements needed by business management, accounting and other groups of undergraduate and practising managers. Finance theory and practice are integrated throughout the course, reflecting the extent to which real world practice has been profoundly shaped by theoretical developments. 

Upon successful completion of the course the student / her will be able to:

•Develop analytical thinking and combine the  involved factors so as to be  able to make the right decisions in a short time 

•make decisions so  as to   ensure maximization of the economic result of the firms

•Understand the procedures for the assessment of the optimal decisions from the financial point of view.

•Use the financial analysis methods and techniques in cases of financial decision making. 

 

Module Description

The course is organized around topics such as:

- Introduction to Financial Analysis

- Funds Needed

- Management of Working Capital

- Financial Statement Analysis

- Short term financial policy

- Analysis of the degree of Leverage

- An Introduction to Investment Appraisal Techniques

- Venture Capital

 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final  Examination (60%)

- Short answer questions

- Questions of solving  problems. 

 

Evaluation Objective: To understand the fundamentals of the course.

Evaluation Criteria: Comprehensiveness, accuracy, and critical evaluation.

 

ΙΙ. Individual  Project (40%) (Summative Evaluation): 

 

Evaluation Objective: To examine students' skills in internet tools and services and to enhance students' teamwork skills.

Evaluation Criteria: Functionality of the application, the degree of specifications' satisfaction, user-interface, organization and management of teamwork project and presentation.

 

Recommended or required Bibliography

Books

1. Apostolopoulos J., (2004), Special issues on Financial Management, Stamoulis 

    Publishers (in Greek).

2. Vasileiou D., Iriotis N. (2008), Financial Management: Theory and Practice,

    Rossili Publishers (in Greek).

3.Karathanasi G., Drakou An. (2010), Financial Management, Benou Publishers

   (in Greek)

4. Kiohos P. and A. Kiohos (2003), Portfogio Management of Financial Risks,

    Sychroni Ekdotiki Publishers ( in Greek)

 5.Weston & Brigham (1986), Principles in Financial Management and Policy, 

     Papazisi Publishers (in Greek).

6.Arnold, G., Corporate Financial Management (2005), 3rd ed. Prentice Hall 2005

7.Brealey,R. & Myers S and Allen,F Principles of Corporate Finance, 9th ed., 

    McGraw Hill

8.Brigham E., Ehrhardt, M. (2005), Financial Management: Theory and Practice,

  11th ed., Thomson South-Western 

9. Lumby S. (1999), Investment Appraisal and Financing Decisions, 

   Thomson Learning.

 

PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: In-Class 
Weekly Hours: Lectures and Workshops-Project Work, 5 
ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Purpose of the course is to introduce students to the philosophy, basic concepts, principles and procedures that pertain to the marketing function.  Students will be exposed to various forms of marketing and  the role of marketing in organizations . Emphasis will be placed on the four elements of the marketing mix (product, price, place, promotion) and the formulation of a marketing plan for a product and/or service. 

 

Upon successful completion of this course  the student will be able to:

•Recognize the basic functions of marketing and the input of the marketing unit in the management of the organization 

•Categorize customers into various groups according to various methods of segmentation 

•Develop the appropriate strategies of STP (segmenting-targeting-positioning) for specific products and services   

•Design  effectively the marketing mix of a product/service 

Module Description

The course is organized around topics such as:

-Philosophy and context of Marketing

-Types of Marketing   

-Consumer Behavior  

-Marketing Research 

-Segmentation-Targeting-Positioning 

-Marketing Mix (4 Ps) 

-Differentiation strategies for products and services 

-Formulation of Marketing Plan 

-Case studies 

 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Ι. Final Examination (70%) (Summative Evaluation) includes:

-Multiple choice questions and/or true-false questions

-Short answer questions

 

Evaluation Objective: To understand the fundamentals of the course.

Evaluation Criteria: Comprehensiveness, accuracy, and critical evaluation.

 

 

ΙΙ. Group Project (30%) (Summative Evaluation) includes: 

-  written work 

- public presentation  

Analysis of case study

Evaluation Objective: To examine students' skills and to enhance students' teamwork skills.

Evaluation Criteria: Degree of specifications' satisfaction, Categorization-organization-adaptation of material, structure and clarity of written text, organization and management of teamwork project and presentation.

 

Recommended or required Bibliography

Books:

•Kyriazopoulos P., Samanta E., (2014). Introduction to Marketing: Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow, Sychroni Ekdotiki Publishing, Athens (in Greek). 

•Fahy J, Jobber D (2014). Principles of Marketing, Kritiki Publishers, Athens (in Greek)

• Armstrong, G. &. Kotler, P. J., (2009), Marketing: An Introduction to Marketing  (9η ed.,) Pearson Edition

•Panigyrakis G., Siomkos G (2005). Marketing Case Studies. Stamoulis, Athens (in Greek) 

•Tzortzakis K & Tzortzakis A (2002). Principles of Marketing, Rosili, Athens (in Greek). 

Selected articles from Journals:

Scientific Marketing (in Greek)  

Business Horizons 

Journal of Marketing 

Journal of European Marketing

Journal of Marketing Management 

Harvard Business Review  

Marketing Intelligence & Planning 

 

BUSINESS STATISTICS II

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: In-Class 
Weekly Hours: Lectures Laboratory and case studies, 5 
ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

 

The aim of the course  is to introduce students to the basic concepts of statistical inference and to familiarize students with the usage of statistical packages . 

After the successful completion of this course the students will be able to:

• Understand the basic concepts of Estimation (with applications primarily in the confidence intervals)

• Apply statistical tests of mean values and rates for one and two samples and interpret the results

• Apply the statistical test chi square and interpret the results

•Develop  basic concepts of quality control charts

•Evaluate different statistical methods on data analysis problems

•For the above must be familiar with appropriate software via the laboratory part of the course

 

Module Description

  • Estimability-Confidence Intervals
  • Statistical tests of mean values 
  • Statistical tests of percentages
  • Chi square test
  • Forecasting
  • Quality control in order to  check on industrial production before it reaches the consumer.

 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

 

Ι. Final Examination (50%) (Summative Evaluation) includes:

-Multiple choice questions or true/false questions

-Short answer questions 

Evaluation Objective: To understand the fundamentals of the course.

Evaluation Criteria: Comprehensiveness, accuracy, and critical evaluation.

 

ΙI. Multiple Choice Tests (10%) (Formative Evaluation)

Concerns issues covered by lectures. 

Evaluation Objective: Examination of students' progress in relation to learning outcomes, feedback and fine tuning of the course lectures.

Evaluation Criteria: Comprehensiveness, accuracy, and critical evaluation.

 

ΙΙΙ.Individual project ( Laboratory) (40%)(Summative Evaluation): 

Concerns issues covered by laboratory lessons. 

Evaluation Objective: Examination of students' progress in relation to learning outcomes, feedback and fine tuning of the laboratory lessons.

Evaluation Criteria: Comprehensiveness, accuracy, and critical evaluation.

 

Evaluation criteria are explicitly referred on the site of the course for each learning activity.

 

Recommended or required Bibliography

Books

Bickel P.J., Doksum K. A., Mathematical Statistics, Volume 1, Basic Ideas and Selected Topics, 2rd ed. Prentice Hall, 2001 

Casella G., Berger R. L., (2001) Statistical Inference, 2nd ed., Duxbury Press,. 

Hogg R. V., Craig A T., McKean J W., (2004) An Introduction to Mathematical Statistics, 6th ed., Prentice Hall.

Landow, S. and Everitt, B.  (2004) A Handbook of Statistical Analyses Using SPSS, Chapman and Hall/CRC Press Company, New York, Washington.

Montgomery D C., Peck E A., Vining G. G, (2001) Introduction to Linear Regression Analysis, 3rd ed., Wiley-Interscience.

Mood A. M.,  Graybill F. A.,  Boes D. C.  (2002) Introduction to the Theory of Statistics. McGraw-Hill Series in Probability and Statistics. McGraw-Hill.

 

JOURNALS

 

Annals of Statistics

Statistics and Probability Letters

Journal of statistical planning and inference

Journal of statistics and probabilities

Journal of business statistics and economics

Journal of business and economic statistics

 

OPERATIONAL RESEARCH

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: In-Class 
Weekly Hours: Lectures, Workshops and Laboratory Exercises, 5 
ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The Operations Research is an essential tool of management for solving executive and operational decision problems throughout the functionality of enterprises and organizations (production, marketing, services, financial management, etc.). The course provides the fundamental knowledge and main areas of Operational Research and the description of methods and applications that cover all the range of functions of enterprises and organisations.

After completing this course the student should be able to:

•Describe real world decision problems and identify the steps to solve them (problem formulation, modeling, methodological approaches and algorithms, exploitation of the results , implementation of the decision).

•Describe how can be used the results of the analyses.

•Identify previous cases which are relevant and can help to solve the problem.

•Analyze decision problems and construct mathematical models describing them, taking into account all the parameters and restrictions governing the decision problem .

•Select and apply the appropriate methodological approach  for solving decision problems.

•Use appropriate mathematical software and develop applications to solve problems.

•Analyze the results and propose a solution or solutions (decisions) and argue for the choice of the proposed decision.

 

Module Description

•Introduction to Operational Research

•Linear ProgrammingΓραμμικός προγραμματισμός,

oDescription and Problem Formulation,

oGraphical Solution of Linear Programme for two variables

oSIMPLEX method

oSensitivity Analysis

oEconomical Interpretation of the results

oUse SIMPEX method for minimisation problems

oCase Studies, Exercises

•Integer Programming and Applications

•Branch and Bound algorithm

•Integer Programming  0/1 and Applications

•Dynamic Programming and Applications

oBellman Theorem

oRecursive Functions

oBackwoard Method

oForewoard Method

oApplications and case studies

 

•Multicriteria Decision Aid Analysis

oFundamentals of Multicriteria Decision Aid Analysis

oCriteria Modelling

oDecision Problems with Discrete Alternative actions

oAlternative actions' evaluation on the criteria

oThe Analytical Hierarchical Method

oMethods of Disaggregation - Aggregation Approach

oApplications and case Studies

 

The practical part  of the  course includes the teaching of real world application and the development of applications with specific software (MS EXCEL/SOLVER, LINDO, MATLAB, ENVI)

Assessment Methods and Criteria

 

Theoretical Part (60%)

Ι. Final Examination (60%) (Summative Evaluation) includes:

-Multiple choice questions 

-Short answer questions

-     Problems solutions with the taught methods

 

ΙΙ. Group Project (30%) (Summative Evaluation): 

 

Evaluation Criteria: 

•Completeness - 35%

•Clearness - 25%

•Documentation - 30%

•Critical Evaluation- 10%

 

ΙII. Individual Oral Presentation  (10%) 

(Formative Evaluation): 

Oral individual presentation at the laboratory. 

 

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Recommended Book and Journal Article Resources:

•Moschona Th. , Chaalikias Μ., Chelidonis G. (2010). Operational Research, Sychroni Ekdotiki Publishers (in Greek)

•Ipsilantis P.  (2010) Operational Research, Propompos Publishers (in Greek)

•Albright, S.C. and Winston, W.L. (2005). Spreadsheet Modeling and Applications: Essentials of Practical Management Science, Thomson Brooks/Cole .

•Anderson, D.R., Sweeney, D.J., Williams, T.A., Camm, J.D. and Martin, K. (2010). An Introduction to Management Science, Quantitative Approaches to Decision Making, 10th ed., Delmar Cengage Learning.

•Siskos, Ι. (1999), Linear Programming, New Technology Publisshers (in Greek).

-Recommended Journals:

•European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier

•Operational Research: An International Journal, Springer

•Annals of Operations Research, Springer

 

HOTEL & RESTAURANT MANAGEMENT

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: In-Class
Weekly Hours: Lectures, Workshop, 5 (3+2) 
ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The course is the basic introductory course to the procedures of hotel and restaurant management.

The material of the course aims at the students’ introduction to the basic concepts of Tourism and, especially, to those of the hotels and the restaurants. Furthermore, it aims at the understanding of the role of management in solving the problems that emerge in the functional system of the tourism enterprises.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

a)know the tourism enterprises’ structure

b)know the tourism enterprises’ organization

c)know the correct management of tourism enterprises

d)understand the way that the tourism enterprises function.

 

Module Description

The course is organized around topics such as:

1.Timeless progress of tourism and its social economic dimension

2.The role of National Tourist Organizations and the interaction between Environment and Tourism

3.The main schools of Administration Science

4.Working in tourist companies and their structure

5.Tourist industry

6.Business Administration of the front office (Hotels) and generally for the employees

7.Economic administration

8.Management and Administration of each floor and the food department

9.Management and Administration of the restaurants in the Hotel Units

10.Management and Administration of the control department

11.Study of the tourist agencies, transport companies and the restaurants 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Ι. Final Examination (60%), which includes: 

-Multiple choice questions 

-Topics for elaboration 

 

ΙΙ. Individual Project (40%) 

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Recommended Book Resources:

•Laloumis, D. – Roupas, V. (1998). “Tourism Enterprises Management”, Stamoulis Publishing, Athens. (in Greek)

• Laloumis, D. (2002). “Hotel Management”, Stamoulis Publishing, Athens. (in Greek)

•Laloumis, D. (2014). “Tourism Enterprises Human Resources Management”, Athens. (in Greek)  

 

4th Semester

MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS (MIS)

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Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: In-Class
Weekly Hours: Lectures, Workshops and Laboratory Exercises, 5 
ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able to:

 

  • Distinguish the recent developments and tendencies that prevail round the Information Systems.
  • Develop the basic significances of strategy of modern Information Systems, the approaches presented in the bibliography, as well as the enterprising practice.
  • Recognize the advantages for an Organisation from the application of modern Management Information Systems.
  • Determine the steps of analysis and development of modern Management Information Systems.
  • Develop Computer Based Management Information Systems.
  • Identify risks and difficulties emerged during the development and the application of Management Information Systems.

 

Module Description

 

The course is organized around topics such as:

 

  • Information & Information Systems, 
  • The strategic role of the MIS, 
  • Organizational Structure of the MIS,
  • MIS technologies,
  • Computer Based Information Systems, 
  • MIS Life cycle, 
  • Analysis, Design and MIS  Integration,
  • The Chen diagrams,  
  • The role of Data Base and Model Base in the development of a MIS. 

 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Ι. Final Examination (60%) (Summative Evaluation) includes:

-Critical questions

-Short answer questions

-     Problems Resolve 

Evaluation Objective: To understand the fundamentals of the course.

Evaluation Criteria: Comprehensiveness, accuracy, and critical evaluation.

 

ΙΙ. Teamwork (40%) (Summative and Formative): 

Development of an MIS.

Evaluation Objective: To examine students' skills in MIS development tools and to enhance students' teamwork skills.

Evaluation Criteria: Functionality of the application, user-interface, organization and management of teamwork project and presentation.

 

Evaluation criteria are explicitly referred on the site of the course for each learning activity.

 

Recommended or required Bibliography

Books

 

  • Υannakopoulos D., Papoutsis I., (2003). Management Information Systems, Synchroni Ekdotiki, Athens (in Greek).
  • Pollalis C, Υannakopoulos D., Papoutsis I., (2004). Business Information Systems, Stamoulis Publications, Athens (in Greek)
  • Ross A. Malaga, (2005). Introduction to Information Technology Systems" Publishing M. Giourdas, Athens (in Greek).
  • Folinas D Manthos B Vlachopoulou M, (2007). Integrated Information Enterprise Resource Management Systems, Anikoula Publications, Thessaloniki (in Greek)
  • Laudon K. C., Laudon J. P, (2009). Information Systems, 7th Edition, Prentice Hall, Athens (in Greek)
  • Economou C., N. Georgopoulos, Benos B, (2004). Information Systems Management Benos Publications (in Greek).
  • Pollalis C Voziki A, (2009). Information Enterprise Resource Planning Systems, UTOPIA Publications, Athens (in Greek)
  • James O'Brien and George Marakas, (2010). Management Information System, Mac Graw Hill Companies, 10th Edition.
  • Avison and Fitzerald, (1998). Information Systems Development: Methodologies, Techniques and Tools, McGraw-Hill Companies, 2nd Edition.   
  • Curtis Graham and David Cobham, (2001). Business Information Systems: Analysis, Design and Practice, Pitman Publishing, 4th Edition.
  • D. Anderson, (2000). Managing Information Systems: Using Cases within an Industry Context to Solve Business Problems with Information Technology, Prentice Hall.
  • Laudon K. C. and J. P. Laudon, (2010). Management Information Systems, Prentice Hall, New Jersey, 11th edition.
  • Raymond McLeod and George Schell, (2006). Management Information Systems, Prentice Hall, 10th Edition.
  • Raymond McLeod Jr, (2001). Management Information Systems, Prentice Hall International, Inc. New Jersey, 8th edition.

 

 

Selected articles from the following journals:

 

  • International Journal of Information Management– Elsevier.
  • The Journal of Strategic Information Systems– Elsevier.
  • Information & Management– Elsevier.

 

PUBLIC RELATIONS IN TOURISM

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: In-Class 
Weekly Hours: Lectures and  Workshops, 4(2L+2W) 
ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

It is a main introductory course to communication policies of contemporary tourism businesses and society. The content of the course aims to introduce students to the basic concepts and methods of public relations in tourism businesses. 

Upon successful completion of the course students will be able to:

a)Recognize the theoretical and applied framework of public relations as a science and a professional practice.

b)Evaluate the role and functions of public relations as a mean of communication in tourism and promotion in modern tourism organizations.

c)Understand the role of public relations as a discipline concerning communication, management, human resources management, marketing, means of communication and new technologies especially in tourism.

d)Gain international perspectives of public relations practice.

e)Understand and handle the key processes involved in public relations and advertising in tourism businesses, such as research, planning, strategy and evaluation.

f)Reinforce the basic concepts of effective public relations in tourism.

g)Understand of the theory and use of methods and techniques of public relations in tourism enterprises required for the promotion of tourism businesses (accommodation, restaurants, food sector, conferences and events facilities, travel agencies, etc.)

h)Develop a public relations campaign in tourism.

i)Organize special tourist events (conferences, exhibitions, international meetings, etc.)

 

Module Description

The course is organized around topics such as:

•Public relations (Historical review, general overview of the practices of public relations, tools and techniques of public relations /Visual, Audio, Audiovisual, forms of organizing public relations, public relations’ personnel)

•Public relations and communication in tourism

•Particularities of  PR and communication in tourism

•Public Relations in tourism and Media

•Methods and techniques of PR in tourism

•Public Relations in private sector and in public tourism body (Ministry of Tourism, GNTO, SETE, etc)

•Contemporary issues of PR and communication in Tourism (travel advisories and PR, crisis management etc.)

•Organization and event management in tourism (conferences, exhibitions, special events, etc.)

•Public Opinion Research in tourism

•Deontology and ethical code of public relations. 

 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Ι. Final Examination (70%) (Summative Evaluation) includes:

-Short answer questions 

-     Topics for elaboration

-    Problem solving (issues concerning public relations strategy)

Evaluation Objective: To understand the fundamentals of the course.

Evaluation Criteria: Comprehensiveness, accuracy, and critical evaluation.

 

ΙΙ. Group Project (10%) (Summative Evaluation) 

A team project will be assigned and presented after completion of the lectures. Students will work together in teams to develop a public relations campaign or the planning of a congress.

Evaluation Objective:  Examination of students’ progress in relation to learning outcomes, of teamwork spirit and communication skills.

Evaluation Criteria: Critical knowledge, teamwork skills, quality of work, communication skills.

 

ΙII. Individual Project (20%)

A written research assignment will be assigned concerning the structure of the public relations department of a particular organization in the private or public sector.

Evaluation Objective:  Examination of students' progress in relation to learning outcomes, feedback and fine tuning of the course lectures, examination of students’ research skills.

Evaluation Criteria: Quality of written and verbal presentation, quality of content, organization and quality of writing, together with the clarity and organization of their presentation.  

Recommended or required Bibliography

Book resources:

Lytras, P. (2008). Public Relations and Communication in Tourism, ed. Interbooks, Athens (in Greek).

Magnisalis Kostas, (2002), Public Relations / Theory and techniques of relations with the public, Interbooks Publishing (in Greek).

Mantas N., Koutroumanos K. (1992), Introduction to Public Relations, Sychroni Ekdotiki Publishing (in Greek).

Koutroupis Th. (2004), Practical Guide of Public Relations, Sakkoula Publishing (in Greek).

Papalexandri N., (2001), Public Relations, Benou Publishing (in Greek).

Panigyrakis G., Ventoura-Neokosmidi  Zoi N., (2001), Contemporary Management of Public Relations, Benou Publishing (in Greek).

Wragg D., (1992), Public Relations Handbook, Cambridge, MA, Blackwell.  

ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND INNOVATION

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: In-Class 
Weekly Hours: Lectures, Workshops, 5 (3L+2W) 
ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

 

The course is the basic introductory course to the concepts of entrepreneurship and innovation. The contemporary, fast-changing economic, technological and social environment, which is formed by factors such as the globalization, the competition, the money markets, the innovation, as well as the consumers’ habits and preferences, establish the framework, within which, new chances for development appear, while, at the same time, new risks are generated. 

The course aims at the students’ introduction to the concepts of entrepreneurship and innovation. 

To be more exact, the course aims at the understanding, for the students’ part, of those activities and actions that relate to the detection of opportunities, as well as the enterprises’ effective operation. 

Furthermore, the course aims at the communication of basic knowledge of the enterprises’ economy, while the contribution of innovation and entrepreneurship to economy is also presented.

 

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

 

a)know subjects concerning the enterprises’ technical and functional support

b)know the enterprises’ organization and structure

c)recognize and understand information concerning the technical and economic situation of the branch within which the enterprise operates

d)effectively cooperate with their colleagues, due to their participation in working groups during the course

e)meet professionals and this is a situation that creates perspectives concerning their employment in the future

f)reinforce their creativity through the implementation of business plans

g)develop abilities relevant to business

h)develop research ability in business environment

i)cultivate their judgment and their abilities on decision making in matters concerning the solution of practical problems

j)recognize investment and developmental incentives

k)recognize and utilize incentives concerning business at the beginning of their career

l)utilize business opportunities arising from the presentation of complete work at a wide spectrum of professionals. 

Module Description

The course is organized around topics such as:

1.Analysis of the meaning of Entrepreneurship and Innovation.

 

2. Theoretical approach of Entrepreneurship and Innovation. 

 

3.Entrepreneurship and modern economical environment. 

 

4.Building new company. 

 

5.Business action plan: business description, market and competition, strategic marketing, functional organization, financing needs, assessment control of the firm and the businessman. 

 

6.Communities and statutes that reinforce entrepreneurship. 

 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Ι. Final Examination (60%), which includes:

-Multiple choice questions 

-topics for elaboration 

ΙΙ. Individual Project(s) (40%)

 

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Recommended Book Resources:

•Kyriazopoulos, P. – Vryzides, L. (2008). “Entrepreneurship: Introduction”, Sygchroni Ekdotiki Publishing, Athens. (in Greek)

•Lampropoulos, P. (2008). “Entrepreneurship”, Propobos Publishing, Athens. (in Greek)

•Karteranis, X. (2015) “Entrepreneurship”, Athens. (in Greek)

 

TOURISM EDUCATION POLICY

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: In Class
Weekly Hours: Lectures and  Workshops , 4(3+1) 
ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

This is a key introductory course in Greek tourism education.

The aim of this course is to introduce students to the Greek education policy and in particular the Greek tourism education policy. 

 

Upon successful completion of the course students will be able to:

a) Understand the structure of tourism education in Greece.

b) Have a wide knowledge of the Greek education system within the frames of the EU’s education policy and be aware of education systems in other European countries.

c) Understand the framework and competences of the different institutions which provide tourism education in Greece.

d) Identify their professional rights and their career perspectives.

e) Recognize the advantages and disadvantages of the Greek tourism education system.

f) Recognize and analyze the aspects of government intervention in the education system and the evolution of education policies. 

Module Description

The course is organized around topics such as:

•Development of the Greek education system. 

•Systemic approaches to education. 

•Organizational and administrative structure of the contemporary Greek education system. 

•Structure of the tourism education system.  

•Tourism Education policy.

•Education , Training , Lifelong Learning ( Schools , Vocational Schools, OTEK Schools, Tour Guide schools , Technological Institutes, Universities, Graduate Studies , training seminars , etc.) . 

•Curriculum of studies of all levels of tourism education.

• Professional rights, accreditation, career for graduates of tourism schools. 

•The tourism education systems within the European Union.  

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Ι. Final Examination (70%) (Summative Evaluation) includes:

-Short answer questions 

-     Topics for elaboration

-    Problem solving (matters concerning issues of the Greek tourism education policy)

Evaluation Objective: To understand the fundamentals of the course.

Evaluation Criteria: Comprehensiveness, accuracy, and critical evaluation.

 

ΙΙ. Group Project (10%) (Summative Evaluation) 

A team project will be assigned and presented after completion of the lectures. Students will work together in teams and present a contemporary issue of Tourism education in Greece or within the European Union.

Evaluation Objective:  Examination of students’ progress in relation to learning outcomes, of teamwork spirit and communication skills.

Evaluation Criteria: Critical knowledge, teamwork skills, quality of work, communication skills.

 

ΙII. Individual Project (20%)

A written research assignment will be assigned concerning the description, comparison and analysis of two tourism education institutions of different levels in Greece. 

Evaluation Objective:  Examination of students' progress in relation to learning outcomes, feedback and fine tuning of the course lectures, examination of students’ research skills.

Evaluation Criteria: Quality of written and verbal presentation, quality of content, organization and quality of writing, together with the clarity and organization of their presentation.  

Recommended or required Bibliography

Book resources:

•Kikilia Katerina (2013). Tourism consciousness and national education. DIROS Publishing, Athens (in Greek).

 

Journal Article Resources:

•Journal of tourism studies

•Tourism Recreation Research

•Leisure, Sport & Tourism Education

TOURISM LAW

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: In-Class 
Weekly Hours: Lectures and Workshops-Project Work, 4 (3+1)
ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The aim of the course’s content is to acquaint students with the complex legal regulations nascent in the tourist industry. The course aims at making students understand the government role in enacting regulations concerning the tourism sector. In particular, for students to perceive the importance of respecting the law regulations in the tourism industry, to be aware of the appropriate requirements for building a tourism business, the regulations and restrictions for entrepreneurship actions in the particular field, as well as the penalties in the event of infraction of the existing legal framework.

Upon successful completion of the course students will be able to:

•Understand the legal framework for the operation of tourism businesses.

•Identify the necessary requirements for an operating license of any type of tourism business.

•Enquire into and manage the necessary administrative and legal documents for the operation of a tourism business.

•Recognize the operation regulations and restriction of tourism businesses according to the legal framework in force. 

Module Description

The course is organized around topics such as:

•Tourism and Law

•Public administration of Tourism. Structure and jurisdictions.

•Legal framework of tourism businesses: Tourist accommodation, Youth hostels, Travel agencies, Tourist shops, Tourism transport businesses (tourist coaches, car and motorcycle rentals, limousines, tourist trains).

•Special tourism infrastructure (conference centers, ski centers, Thematic parks, Mountain refuges, Spa centers, car circuits, golf courses).

 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Ι. Final Examination (80%) (Summative Evaluation) includes:

-Multiple choice questions or true

-Topics for elaboration 

 

ΙΙ. Individual Project (20%) 

Recommended or required Bibliography

Mylonopoulos, D. (2011). Tourism Law, Nomiki Vivliothiki Publishing, Athens, (in Greek).

•Chatzinikolaou, E. (2008). Legislation of Tourism Businesses, Propobos Publishing, (in Greek).

Selected articles from the following journals:

•International Travel Law Journal 

TOURISM SOCIOLOGY

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: In-Class 
Weekly Hours: Lectures, Workshops, 4(2+2) 
ECTS: 4
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The course is the key introductory course in sociology and tourism sociology. The content of the course aims at connecting sociology to tourism, studying tourism as a social phenomenon and its impacts in various sectors (social, economic, cultural, environmental etc) 

Upon successful completion of the course students will be able to:

•Completely analyze tourism in all its dimensions, as a social phenomenon.

•Recognize and understand the motives of tourist movement.

•Understand tourism’s socio-psychological, economic, cultural and environmental impacts.

•Recognize and manage the tourists’ needs.

•Make proposals for policy management of the tourism phenomenon.

•Show sensitivity to tourism ethical issues. 

Module Description

The course is organized around topics such as:

•Introduction to sociology. 

•Key concepts of tourism sociology.

•Tourism and social sciences.

•The tourist. Characteristics and motives of tourist trips.

•Tourism and needs.

•Socio-cultural impacts of tourism 

•Political, environmental and international social dimensions of tourism.

•Tourism impacts. Social, psychological, cultural, economic, environmental impacts of tourism.

•Roles and stereotypes.

•Ethics in tourism.

•International social dimensions of tourism. 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Ι. Final Examinations (80%) 

includes: 

-Topics for elaboration

 

ΙΙ. Group Project (20%)  

Recommended or required Bibliography

Book resources:

•Lytras P., (2003), Sociology of Tourism, 4th edition, Interbooks Publishing, Athens (in Greek).

•Tsartas P., (1996), Tourists, Traveling, Sites: Sociological Approaches to Tourism, ed. Exantas, Athens (in Greek).

•Holden A., (2008), Sociological Approaches to Tourism, Papazisis Publishing, Athens (in Greek).

•Kokkosis, H. – Tsartas, P. (2001). Sustainable Tourism Development and Environment, ed. Kritiki, Athens (in Greek).  

 

-Journal resources:

•Annals of Tourism Research, Tourism Management  

5th Semester

OBJECT ORIENTED PROGRAMMING

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Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: In-Class 
Weekly Hours: Lectures, Workshops and Laboratory Exercises, 6 
ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

 The course aims to equip the students with the necessary theoretical knowledge and practical skills relating to the current methodology and technology of software development. Particularly, emphasis is given to:

•the development of applications in Window environment (GUI) WEB environment.

•the methodological approach and techniques of object-oriented programming

 

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

•Describe and identify concepts related to object-oriented programming such as classes, objects, polymorphism, inheritance, abstraction and encapsulation.

•Describe and apply methodological approaches and techniques for designing and development of software applications utilising the object-oriented programming approach.

•Design small scale applications using the Design language UML.

•Develop small scale software applications using classes, objects, structures, interfaces, event handlers and overlapping functions.

•Compose programs by following syntax rules of object oriented programming.

•Utilize libraries of the WINDOWS programming environment.

Module Description

Introduction to Object Oriented Programming (OOP)

•Methodological frame for OOP

•Design software applications

•The UML object oriented design language

•Software Develipment Environments for OOP

•Programming Language for OOP (C++, C#, Visual Basic, JAVA)

•Variables and operands

•Data types, structures

•Commands

•Assignment Operands

•Subroutines and functions

•Classes and Objects

•Interfaces

•Properties and Methods

•Arrays, Indexers and enumerators

•Delegates and Events

•Event handlers

•Polymorphism and Inheritance

•Subtraction and encapsulation

•File management

•Libraries

The practical part  of the  course includes the development of real world application in one of the following programming tools (VISUAL Studio.NET, C++, JAVA)  

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Ι. Final Examination (60%) (Summative Evaluation) includes:

-Multiple choice questions 

-Short answer questions

-     Small software programmes

 

ΙΙ. Group Project (30%) (Summative Evaluation): 

.

Evaluation Criteria: 

•Functionality of application- 25%

•Completeness of applications - 40%

•Documentation - 20%

•Usability of application- 15%

 

ΙV. Individual Oral Presentation (10%) (Formative Evaluation): 

Individual Oral Examination at the Laboratory. 

 

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Recommended Book and Journal Article Resources:

•Spyridakos A., (2009) Object Oriented Programming in  Visual Basic.NET, Synchroni Ekdotiki Publishers (in Greek)

•Spyridakos A., (2010), Object Oriented Application in  Visual Basic.NET environment, Synchroni Ekdotiki Publishers (in Greek)

-Recommended Journals:

•Journal of Object Oriented Programming, SIGS Publications 

TOURISM ECONOMICS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: In-Class 
Weekly Hours: Lectures and Workshops-Project Work, 5 
ECTS: 6
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Tourism Economics is the study of economic actions of individuals and well defined groups of individuals in the tourism field. The fundamental economic principles as they apply to the tourism industry and explore the impacts of leisure and tourism on regional and national economics.are examined and analyzed.Topics include the determinants of consumer demand for leisure travel; structure of competition among suppliers of tourism services; benefits and costs of tourism development to the host community.Topics also include international tourism development and economic growth, planning tourism development and the basic principles of tourism education.

 

Upon successful completion of the course students will be able to:

a) Understand the operation of tourism enterprises

b) Consolidate the technical operation of tourism enterprises and the formation of prices of goods and services offered by tourism companies

c) Analyze the impact of changes in economic parameters in the mode of

 tourism business

d) Understand the complexity of economic variables underlying microeconomic and macroeconomic tourist environment

 

Module Description

1.Determinants of consumer demand for leisure travel. 

2.Structure of competition among suppliers of tourism services.

3.Benefits and costs of tourism development to the host community.

4.Government’s role in the taxation, subsidy, regulation and protection of the tourism industry.

5.Tourism’s impact on the environment.

6.Sustainable tourism development. 

7.International tourism development.

8.Economic growth, planning tourism development and the basic principles of tourism education.

 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Ι. Final Examination (60%) 

includes:

-Multiple choice questions 

-Topics for elaboration

 

ΙΙ. Individual Project(s) (40%) 

 

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Sinclair, T., Stabler, M. (1997). “TheEconomicsofTourism”, Routledge.

2.Lundberg, D., Krishnamoorthy, M., Stavenga, M. (1995). “Tourism economics”, Wiley.

3.Reece, W. (2009). “The Economics of Tourism”, Prentice Hall.

4.Stabler, M., Papatheodorou, T. (2009). “The Economics of Tourism”, Routledge.

MARTIME TOURISM

 

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: In-Class 
Weekly Hours: Lectures and Workshops-Project Work, 5 (3+2) 
ECTS: 6
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

It is a key introductory course to maritime tourism. The course content aims to introduce students to the main concepts of shipping, cruise shipping and their significance to Greek and global economy. The course’s aim is to make the organizing and operation of all types of tourist ships and the maritime tourism activity in general understandable to students.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

•Understand the operation of a tourist ship/vessel.

•Manage the various sections of organization and entertainment in a tourist ship.

•Understand the tourist ports operation and the necessity of operational procedures. 

Module Description

The course is organized around topics such as:

•The contribution of marine tourism to Greek economy.

•Technological evolution of tourist ships (cruise ship and passenger ship).

•Terminology of the ship’s departments and areas especially emphasizing on the hotel/accommodation areas of the ship.

•Ship’s crew/ hospitality personnel.

•Hotel type specializations in passenger and cruise ships.

•The administrative supervisory body of maritime tourism

•Tourist ports.

•(Geographical) Regions of cruise development.

•Marine labor relations.

•Organization and management of cruise shipping companies.

 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Ι. Final Examination (80%) (Summative Evaluation) includes:

-Multiple choice questions or true

-Topics for elaboration 

 

ΙΙ. Individual Project (20%) 

 

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Recommended Book and Journal Article Resources:

•Mylonopoulos, D. (2004). “Shipping. Concepts-Sectors-Structures.”, Stamoulis Ath. Publishing, Athens, (in Greek).

•Mylonopoulos, D. – Moira, P. (2005). “Maritime Tourism”, Interbooks Publishing, Athens, (in Greek).

•Mylonopoulos, D. – Demeroutis, G. (2010). “Maritime knowledge”, Eug. Eugenidiou Foundation (in Greek).

•Mylonopoulos, D. – Moira, P. (2010). “Maritime Geography”, Eug. Eugenidiou Foundation (in Greek).

•Mylonopoulos, D. – Moira, P. – Alexopoulos, (2001). “Maritime Knowledge”, Pedagogical Institute, Athens, (in Greek).

•Mylonopoulos, D. (2005). “Maritime Knowledge”, Pedagogical Institute, Athens, assignment 2003 (in Greek). 

CULTURAL IMPACT IN TOURISM

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: In-Class 
Weekly Hours: Lectures and  Workshops, 5(3+2) 
ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The aim of the course is for students to understand the significance of culture and cultural heritage for tourism development.

 

Religion is an important aspect of culture and the exploitation of religious-cultural heritage contributes to tourism development.

 

Upon successful completion of the course students will be able to:

 

a) Understand the concepts of culture and cultural heritage

 

b) Understand and assess the various aspects of culture

 

c) Recognize the importance of religious tourism and particularly the difference between pilgrimage and tourism.

 

d) Identify key tourism related cultural, ecological and social impacts within a global context recognizing both positive and negative impacts.

 

e) Recognize the cultural impact of religious tourism on tourist destinations.

 

f) Exploit the religious element as a part of cultural tourism in order to create tourist flows.

 

Module Description

The course is organized around topics such as:

 

•Culture and Tourism. 

 

•Culture and cultural heritage. 

 

•Cultural impacts in tourism (especially religious tourism). 

 

•The environment of religious tourism. 

 

•Typology of religious tourism.

 

•The entrepreneurial aspect of religious tourism.

 

•Cultural tourism and sustainable development. 

 

•Techniques and methods for managing religious-cultural tourism.

 

•Institutions and actions.

 

• Monuments of world cultural and Natural heritage. 

 

•Tourism impacts in culture (positive and negative). 

 

•The interdependence of various types of tourism related impacts. 

 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Ι. Final Examination (70%) (Summative Evaluation) includes:

 

-     Topics for elaboration

 

-    Short answer questions

 

-    Problem solving (issues concerning cultural and religious  tourism)

 

Evaluation Objective: To understand the fundamentals of the course.

 

Evaluation Criteria: Comprehensiveness, accuracy, and critical evaluation.

 

 

 

ΙΙ. Group Project (10%) (Summative Evaluation) 

 

A team project will be assigned and presented after completion of the lectures. Students will work together in teams and present a current issue of cultural impacts in a tourist destination of their choice in Greece.

 

Evaluation Objective:  Examination of students’ progress in relation to learning outcomes, of teamwork spirit and communication skills.

 

Evaluation Criteria: Critical knowledge, teamwork skills, quality of work, communication skills.

 

 

 

ΙII. Written assignment (20%)

 

Two written research assignments will be assigned concerning the presentation of significant monuments or cultural aspects in Greece or globally. 

 

Evaluation Objective:  Examination of students' progress in relation to learning outcomes, feedback and fine tuning of the course lectures, examination of students’ research skills.

 

Evaluation Criteria: Quality of written and verbal presentation, quality of content, organization and quality of writing together with the clarity and organization of their presentation.  

 

Recommended or required Bibliography

Books:

 

•Moira Polyxeni (2009). «Religious Tourism», Interbooks Publishing, Athens (in Greek).

 

Journal Article resources:

 

•Ιnternational Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research  

 

•CULTUR, Revista de Cultura e Turismo

 

TOURISM GEOGRAPHY OF GREECE

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: In-Class 
Weekly Hours: Lectures, Workshops, 5(3L+2W) 
ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

 The aim of the course is to introduce students the key concepts of tourism geography in Greece.

After being taught this course students are expected to identify and manage:

•The geographical variety and the contrasts of the tourist movements

•The geographical distribution of Greek tourist regions

•The distribution of human, natural and cultural sources of Greece

•The significance of geographical factors in tourism development

•The available infrastructures

Upon successful completion of the course students will be able to:

a)Identify the natural sources of Greek regions

b)Identify the country’s human and cultural sources

c)Combine organized tours with visits to tourism natural and cultural sources 

d)Have knowledge of and utilize the available infrastructure

Module Description

The course is organized around topics such as:

1Geographical description of Greece, issues of tourism interest, environment, ecosystems, parks, forests, monuments, shelters, sports centers, religious centers, centers of maritime and mountain tourism, special forms of tourism and perspectives.

2Analysis of the country’s natural, human and natural sources as well as its infrastructure.

3Special reference to important monuments and tourism destinations.

4Highlighting, for every geographical territory and region, of the particularities of tourists’ welcome and accommodation centers (environment, ecosystems, parks, forests, monuments, shelters, sports centers, religious centers, maritime and mountain tourism centers, special forms of tourism and perspectives).

 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Ι. Final Examination (60%) 

includes:

-Multiple choice questions 

-Topics for elaboration

 

ΙΙ. Individual Project(s) (40%) 

Recommended or required Bibliography

Book resources

•Moira, P. (2005). “Tourism Geography of Greece”, Interbooks Publishing, Athens, (in Greek).

•Moira, P. (1999). “Tourism Geography – Europe”, Stamoulis Ath. Publishing, Athens, (in Greek).

•Moira, P. (2000). Tourism Geography – Asia, Stamoulis Ath. Publishing, Athens, (in Greek).

•Moira, P. (2001). Tourism Geography – Africa, America, Oceania, Stamoulis Ath. Publishing, Athens, (in Greek).

Journals

•Tourism Geographies 

 

•Geographies (in Greek) 

6th Semester

DATA BASES

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Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: In-Class 
Weekly Hours: Lectures, Workshops and Laboratory Exercises, 5 
ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The development of information Systems is based on Relational Data Bases Technology. This course covers the fundamentals of Relational Data Bases and presents in details the methodologies and techniques for designing and developing applications with the exploitation of Relational Data Base Management Systems. Also, the Structured Query Language is taught and applied.

 

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

•Describe the functions of Data Bases in enterprises or organizations and determine the usability for the data management.

•Explain and demonstrate how the data bases can be effectively used.

•Design data bases using the concepts of semantic, logical and physical design.

•Administrate and query data bases using SQL (Standard Query Language). 

•Develop data base applications using the popular Relational Data Base Management Systems (SQL SERVER, ORACLE, MySQL, ACCESS).

•Develop interfaces for windows (client-server) and WEB (n-tier) linked to Data Bases. 

Module Description

Introduction to Data Base Systems

•File Based Applications

•Constraints of File Based Applications

•Data Bases and Data Base Management Systems (DBMS)

•Cons and Prons of DBMS

Fundamentals of Relational Data Bases

•Three Level architecture (ANSI-SPARC)

•Language for Data Bases

•Functions of data Bases

•Concepts of Relational Model Σχεσιακού Μοντέλου

•Relations in Data Bases

•Principles of Integrity 

•Views

 

Normilisations

•Normalised data Base

•Steps of Normalisations

•Functional Dependency

•Principles of Normalisations

•Techniques

 

Case Studies of Data Bases Design

•The Life Cyrcle

•Semantic Design.

•Logical Design

•Physical Design

•Transactions Design

The Language SQL

•Introduction to SQL

•Data Definition Language and Data Manipulation Language

•the commands CREATE, ALTER, DROP TABLE

•The command   SELECT  and its applications

•The join in SQL

•Views with SQL

•The commands  UPDATE and DELETE

•the commands GRANT and REVOKE

•Applications

Integrity management

•Data Base Administration

•Integrity Management 

•Recovery

Case Studies

Τhe practical part of the course  includes teaching of a Relational Data Base Management Systems (MS ACCESS, SQL Server, ORACLE, MySQL) and the development of an integrated Systems in one of the above mentioned RDBMS. 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Ι. Final Examination (60%) (Summative Evaluation) includes:

-Multiple choice questions 

-Short answer questions

-     Problems concerning the design and development of Data Base applications

 

ΙΙ. Group Project (30%) (Summative Evaluation): 

Course Work in groups of 2 or 3 students.

Evaluation Criteria: 

•Completeness - 35%

•Clearness - 25%

•Documentation - 30%

•Critical Evaluation- 10%

 

ΙII. Individual Project (10%) (formative)

Development of a Data Base in the Laboratory 

Recommended or required Bibliography

-Books: 

•Elmasri, Ramez, Navathe, Shamkant B., Fundamentals of Data Base Systems, (in Greek)

•Connolly, Thomas M., Begg, Carolyn E., Data Base Systems (in Greek)

-Journals:

•Journal of Data Base Management, IGI GLOBAL

•International Journal of Intelligent Information and Data Base Systems, INDERSCIENCE Publishers.  

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY FOR MANAGERS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: In-Class 
Weekly Hours: Lectures, Workshops and Laboratory Exercises, 5
ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

 

The aim of this course is to introduce students to research methodology in order to have the opportunity to study and prepare a scientific text and especially to have the knowledge and skills to develop their dissertation.

 

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

•Understand the different ways of research approach

•Investigate the literature and be able to prepare a literature review of a topic

•Choose the appropriate methodological approach to various case studies

•Carry out sample surveys and calculate the appropriate sample size

•Recognize the limitations of research

•Compare survey results 

Module Description

The course is organized around topics such as:

• Report on research philosophy

• Study literature

• Search hardware and statistical data ,

• Defining the methodology in several case studies

• Sampling technics -types of sampling

• Determination of sample size

• Measuring ranges of qualitative and quantitative data ,

• Validity and reliability of questionnaire

• Presentation and analysis of results,

• Critical discussion and comparison of findings with other studies,

• Conclusions and suggestions for further research and analysis. 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Ι. Final Examination (50%) (Summative Evaluation) includes:

-Multiple choice questions or true/false questions

-Short answer questions 

Evaluation Objective: To understand the fundamentals of the course.

Evaluation Criteria: Comprehensiveness, accuracy, and critical evaluation.

 

ΙΙ. Group Project (30%) (Summative Evaluation): 

Development of a research proposal

Evaluation Objective: To examine students' skills.

Evaluation Criteria: Completeness of the project

ΙII. Multiple Choice Test (10%) (Formative Evaluation)

Concerns issues covered by lectures. 

Evaluation Objective: Examination of students' progress in relation to learning outcomes, feedback and fine tuning of the course lectures.

Evaluation Criteria: Comprehensiveness, accuracy, and critical evaluation.

 

ΙV. Laboratory Exercise (10%) (Formative Evaluation): 

Concerns issues covered by laboratory lessons. 

Evaluation Objective: Examination of students' progress in relation to learning outcomes, feedback and fine tuning of the laboratory lessons.

Evaluation Criteria: Comprehensiveness, accuracy, and critical evaluation.

 

Evaluation criteria are explicitly referred on the site of the course for each learning activity. 

Recommended or required Bibliography

Books

•Earl R. Babbie, (2016), The Practice of Social Research, 14th Edition,  Chapman University, Berkeley, ISBN-10: 1305104943, ISBN-13: 9781305104945 

•Yves Gagnon, (2010), The case study as a research method a practical handbook, Press de la Universite du Quebec.

 

Journals

•Journal of research methods and methodological issues

•Journal of research methods

•Journal of research methods and analytics 

POLICIES OF THE ALTERNATIVE FORMS OF TOURISM

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: In-class lecturing 
Weekly Hours: Lectures, Workshops, 6 
ECTS: 6
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The course refers to the alternative forms of tourism. The material of the course aims at the understanding of the basic forms of alternative tourism and their developmental policies. Maritime tourism is specially stressed due to the fact that it constituents one of the major pylons of the country’s touristic development. 

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

a)Know the alternative forms of tourism that contribute to sustainable development

b)Understand the importance of developing alternative forms of tourism in the development of less-developed regions and the elongation of tourist season

c)Understand the content of special and alternative forms of tourism

d)Recognize the motives that urge tourists to choose alternative forms of tourism

e)Analyze, using arguments, the need for the development of special and alternative forms of tourism

f)Know the current legal frame concerning the development of special and alternative forms of tourism. 

Module Description

1.Sustainable touristic development and policymaking.

2.The natural and cultural environment of the alternative forms of tourism, with stress placed on maritime tourism.

3.Typology and forms of maritime tourism (gastronomic, religious, cultural, industrial-cultural, coastal, submarine, tourism of the nature, piscatorial tourism, marine cultural, sport tourism, etc).

4.The incentives of the tourists of alternative tourism.

5.The management of alternative forms of tourism.

6.Developmental policies of the alternative forms of tourism. 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Ι. Final Examination (80%) that is comprised of multiple choice questions.

 

ΙΙ. Individual Project (20%) of each student’s individual project.  

Recommended or required Bibliography

•Kokkosis, Ch. – Tsartas, P. – Grimpa, E. (2011). Special and Alternative Forms of Tourism. Stamoulis, A. Publishing, Athens. (in Greek)

•Mylonopoulos, D. – Moira, P. (2005). Maritime Tourism. Interbooks Publishing, Athens. (in Greek)

•Sotiriades, M. – Farsari, I. (2009). Alternative Forms and Special Interest Tourism, ed. Interbooks, Athens (in Greek).

NEW TECHNOLOGIES IN TOURISM

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: In-Class 
Weekly Hours: Lectures and Workshops, 5 
ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The course aims to enable students to distinguish how the New Technologies, particularly the Internet affect the Business Administration and Tourism Hospitality and to be able to use tools and Internet services to plan and implement small-scale applications / services by that sector.

 

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

•Recognize the impact of Information and Communication technologies, especially of the Internet in Tourism and Hospitality Management

•Present the fundamental principles of e-Business and e-Commerce in Tourism and Hospitality Management

•Use tools and services of the internet in the development of small-scale applications / e-services in Tourism and Hospitality Management 

•Examine applications and online services in tourism in relation to the strategy and the technology used 

Module Description

The course is organized around topics such as:

•The impact of ICT in contemporary Tourism and Hospitality Management

•e-Commerce and e-Business in Tourism

•Business models in Tourism and Hospitality Management

•Global Reservation Systems

•Internet Technologies and Applications 

•Internet standards

•The future of internet infrastructure

•Web services, SaaS, and Service-Oriented Architecture 

•Social Networking, WEB 2.0, WEB 3.0

•Mobile Devices & Services in Tourism

•Data Privacy protection and trust in e-Transactions

•Technological Innovation and Evaluation of Technology 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Ι. Final Examination (50%) (Summative Evaluation) includes:

-Multiple choice questions or true/false questions

-Short answer questions

-     Case Study 

Evaluation Objective: To understand the fundamentals of the course.

Evaluation Criteria: Comprehensiveness, accuracy, and critical evaluation.

 

ΙΙ. Group Project (40%) (Summative Evaluation): 

Development of an e-Commerce Site for Tourism

Evaluation Objective: To examine students' skills in internet tools and services and to enhance students' teamwork skills.

Evaluation Criteria: Functionality of the application, the degree of specifications' satisfaction, user-interface, organization and management of teamwork project and presentation.

 

ΙII. Multiple Choice Test (10%)(Formative Evaluation)

Concerns issues covered by lectures. 

Evaluation Objective: Examination of students' progress in relation to learning outcomes, feedback and fine tuning of the course lectures.

Evaluation Criteria: Comprehensiveness, accuracy, and critical evaluation.

 

Evaluation criteria are explicitly referred on the site of the course for each learning activity. 

Recommended or required Bibliography

Books

•Chaffey, Dave, (2015). Digital Corporations and E-Commerce: Strategy, Implementation and Application, 6th American Edition, ISBN: 978-960-461-671-8, Klidarithmos Publishing EPE (in Greek)

•Katsoni V., (2011). Global Distribution Systems and Technology in Tourism, ISBN 978-960-93-3067-1,  Athens: Katsoni Vasiliki (in Greek).

•Chaffey, Dave, (2011). E-business and e-commerce management : strategy, implementation, and practice, 5th ed., ISBN-10: 0273752014, ISBN-13: 978-0273752011.

 

Internet Resources

•eBusiness Forum. http://www.ebusinessforum.gr/

•https://el.wikipedia.org/wiki/%CE%97%CE%BB%CE%B5%CE%BA%CF%84%CF%81%CE%BF%CE%BD%CE%B9%CE%BA%CF%8C%CF%82_%CF%84%CE%BF%CF%85%CF%81%CE%B9%CF%83%CE%BC%CF%8C%CF%82

•HTML Tutorials from w3schools URL: http://www.w3schools.com/html/ 

•Web Fundamentals, URL: http://www.codecademy.com/tracks/web 

•Dr. Kevin Floyd, (2013). XHTML/CSS Tutorial, URL: http://www.merlot.org/merlot/viewMaterial.htm?id=451821 

•Smart Webby Inc., (2013). Web Development Resources, URL: http://www.merlot.org/merlot/viewMaterial.htm?id=77936

 

Journals

•Journal of Information Technology and Tourism, Springer.

•Travel and Tourism Analyst Journal, Economist Intelligence Unit (UK).

•International Journal of Hospitality Management, Science Direct.   

CROSS -CULTURAL MANAGEMENT

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: In-Class 
Weekly Hours: Lectures and Workshops-Project Work, 4 
ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The ability to communicate cross culturally and understand diverse perspectives is a necessity in order to achieve a competitive advantage in our global economy. In international business cross-cultural aspects are important because as soon as national borders are crossed there is an exposure to dilemmas that are not common in the domestic scene.

 

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

a)Understand the impact of culture on management 

b)Identify the areas in which cultural differences present a challenge in managing people across cultures

c)Become more self-aware of our cultural conditioning, individual biases and assumptions

d)Understand the implications these have on our interactions with people who are different from us.

Module Description

1.Basic terminology of cultures and company cultures.

2.groupings of cultures and differences in value systems.

3.Managers as communicators and cosmopolitans.

4.Multicultural negotiation strategies and practices.

5.Multicultural teamwork and meaning of individual/group.

6.Understanding and managing cultural diversity.

7.International assignments and global career development.

8.Managing cultures in international mergers and acquisitions.

9.Leading responsibly in multicultural environment.

10.Cross-cultural leadership. 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Ι. Final Examination (80%) that is comprised of multiple choice questions.

 

ΙΙ. Individual Project (20%) of each student’s individual project. 

Recommended or required Bibliography

1. Steers, R., Sanchez-Runde, R., Nardon, L. (2013). “Management Across Cultures: Challenges and Strategies”, Cambridge University Press.

2. Solomon, C., Schell, M. (2009). “ManagingAcross Cultures: The Seven Keys to Doing Business with a Global Mindset”,McGraw Hill.

3. Lewis, R. (2006). “When Cultures Collide: Leading Across Cultures”,Brealey N. Publishing.

4. Lewis, R. (2012). “When Teams Collide: Managing the International Team Successfully”,BrealeyN. Publishing.

5. Hofstede,G.J., Minkov, M. (2010). “Cultures and organizations: software of the mind”,McGraw-Hill. 

LABOR RELATIONS IN TOURISM

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: In-Class
Weekly Hours: Lectures and Workshops-Project Work, 5 
ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The course constitutes the core pillar for the understanding of rights and obligations for the employees in the field of tourism. The aim of the course’s content is for students to acquire knowledge and skills of the key concepts of the workplace, such as employment contract, employer, employee, employment timeout, arbitration etc as well as the specificity of different labor agreements in tourism. In addition, students will recognize the various actors in the field of tourism employment, the employment prerequisites in the tourism sector and they will understand security and hygiene issues in the tourism workplace.

 

Upon successful completion of the course students will be able to:

•Have knowledge of their rights as employees in the various sectors of tourism.

•Assert their rights in any different employment position in the tourism sector.

•Understand the particularity of tourism employment and the importance of human communication regarding tourism service provision.

•Adhere hygiene and security rules within the workplace. 

Module Description

The course is organized around topics such as:

•Employment and tourism.

•Special characteristics in tourism workplace.

•Employment-employment sectors in tourism.

•Employer’s and employee’s obligations in the field of tourism.

•Hotel industry, tourist and food stores’, tourism and travel agencies’, air transport companies’, tourist coaches’, tour guides’ employment contracts.  

•Insurance bodies in the tourism sector.

•Hygiene and security in the tourism sector. 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Ι. Final Examination (80%) (Summative Evaluation) includes:

-Multiple choice questions or true

-Topics for elaboration 

 

ΙΙ. Individual Project (20%) 

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Recommended Book and Journal Article Resources:

•Moira, P. – Mylonopoulos, D. (2014). Labor Relations. Institutions, Politics, Applications (International, European Environment, Maritime, Tourism), ed. Nomiki  Vivliothiki, Athens (in Greek)

•Mylonopoulos, D. – Mentis, Gr. – Moira, P. (2001). Labor relations in Tourism enterprises. Legal Approach, ed. Propobos, Athens, (in Greek).

•Lytras P. (1992). Labor Relations, ed. Nikitopoulos, Athens (in Greek)

Journal

Working Relations Review 

7th Semester

TOURISM TERMINOLOGY IN ENGLISH

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Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: In-class lecturing 
Weekly Hours: Lectures and Workshops-Project Work, 5 (3+2) 
ECTS:
Web Page:
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Learning Outcomes

The course aims to familiarise students with different aspects of English for Tourism, working on main language points, register and vocabulary through a variety of topics related to the tourist industry. The syllabus is designed to enhance students’ competence in English, by practising the essential language skills of reading, writing, listening and speaking,  to enable them to function effectively in a variety of professional and academic settings. 

 

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

•understand authentic business texts (textbooks, reference material and other sources written in English); 

•employ appropriate business formats to produce a range of business documents for different audiences and purposes (letters, e-mails, memos, and reports);

•listen and understand business-related material, such as conversations, announcements, and news bulletins;

•communicate effectively and in appropriate style on business or professional matters  (customers, international tourists and co-workers in Greece or abroad);

•write academic essays - that  contain a clear thesis, unified coherent paragraphs and relevant supporting details -  supported by assigned readings, with proper citation;

•make an oral presentation on a business-related topic. 

Module Description

Readings

      

 The 13 week syllabus includes the following specialized topics:

•Tourism defined 

•The elements of the tourism system

•Tourism consumer behavior

•Marketing for tourism

•The tourism channel of distribution

•Accommodation

•Transportation

•The public sector

•The tourism destination

•The economic impact of tourism

•Tourism and the environment

•The socio-cultural impact of tourism

•Working in the tourism industry

 

Language work

 

Using persuasive techniques; retrieving and providing Information; advising; describing sequence of events; describing situations and places; reporting; making hypothetical versus factual statements; using passive versus active voice; use of modals; asking questions; expressing opinions; apologizing; explaining. 

 

Writing Skills

•Structuring  and organizing expository texts ; methods of paragraph development (example, cause and effect, process analysis, comparison and contrast, classification) 

•Structuring an argument

•Describing factual information presented in graphical form  

•Writing abstracts and summaries

 

Business skills practice includes:

•Letters of application for a job/course & CV writing

•Reports and letters on business situations (inquiries, offers, orders and order acknowledgements, payment and reminders, complaints, travel arrangements) 

•Questionnaires

•Tourist information leaflets

•Business meetings

•Business presentations

Assessment Methods and Criteria

oFinal Examination (80%) Questions on text comprehension, terminology, and use of English (based on the material discussed in class)

Task types: 

-Multiple choice questions or true/false questions

- Cloze test

- Short answers 

-Summary

- Paragraph writing

oGroup or Individual 'Project (20%) PowerPoint presentation and script on a topic approved by the instructor, related to tourism economics, management, and  marketing. 

Recommended or required Bibliography

•Koutsoyanni,E. Themes in Tourism. Coursenotes.

•Koutsoyanni, E. (2008) Writing Skills for Academic and Professional Purposes. Course notes.

•Koutsoyanni, E. (2013) A Guide to English Grammar and Usage. Course notes. 

•Hardwick,C. English for Tourism. British council Specialist English. [Online] Available at:   

    www.britishcouncil.org/professionals-specialisms-tourism-intro.htm

•A selection of topics from the LCCI Spoken English for Tourism Syllabus (at the teacher’s discretion) 

•Selected material from textbooks, newspaper articles, journals, brochures, advertisements, etc. (at the teacher’s discretion)   

TOURISM MARKET ANALYSIS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: In-Class 
Weekly Hours: Lectures and Workshops-Project Work, 6 (4+2) 
ECTS:
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Learning Outcomes

The course aims to enable students to understand the concept and content of tourism market research. It connects market research to the procedure of tourism marketing and analyzes the relation between decision making and planning research projects. The significance of research in tourism is presented, the particularities and the special features of tourism market research are indicated and the main parts of research are described. In addition, the notions of quantitive and qualitative research are analyzed.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

•Understand the key methodologies used for tourism market research.

•Describe the types of research planning.

•Analyze the stages of research procedure as well as the types of research according to the origin of the data.

•Explain the various ways of collecting primary data and evaluate the methods of communication with the public.

•Describe the restrictions of tourism market research.

•Identify the organizations carrying out research in tourism.

•Use the results of previous researches.

•Analyze the notion of sampling in tourism research market and the key sampling methodologies which may be used.

•Form questionnaires and construct open or closed questions of all types.

•Explain the technique of interviewing.

•Use key techniques of qualitative research.

General Skills

-  Individual work

-  Teamwork

- Search, analysis and synthesis of data and information through the use of appropriate technologies.

- Decision making.

-  Adapt to new situations.

- Work in an interdisciplinary environment. 

Module Description

The course is organized around topics such as:

•Introductory concepts in research.

•Special features of tourism market research.

•Tourism Market research methodologies (types of market planning, research methods, types of markets, restrictions, TMR organizations).

•Sample and sampling, Questionnaires.

•Planning, Questions, Methods and techniques of data collection.

•Interviews.

•Qualitative research.

•Data analysis and data processing.

•Drafting of the final report.

•Presentation.

•Applications.  

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Ι. Final Examination (60%) 

includes:

-Multiple choice questions 

-Questions of judgment

-     Problem solving (issues concerning tourism questionnaires)

-     Comparative evaluation of learning outcomes

 

ΙΙ. Individual Project (40%)  

Recommended or required Bibliography

Book resources:

•Christou E. (1999). Tourism Market Research, ed. Interbooks, (in Greek).

•Moira, P. (2006) Tourism Market Research, ed. National School of Public Administration. (in Greek)

 

-Journal Resources:

•Annals of Tourism Research

•Annals of Leisure Research

•Journal of Travel Research 

•Tourism Management, Research, Policies, Practice

•Asia Pacific Journal of Tourism Research 

EUROPEAN POLICIES IN TOURISM

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: In-Class 
Weekly Hours: Lectures and  Workshops, 5(3+2) 
ECTS:
Web Page:
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Learning Outcomes

It is a key introductory course on the European Union and its policies in the tourism sector.

The content of the course aims to introduce students to the basic concepts and institutions of the European Union and moreover provide wide knowledge on policies that affect tourism directly or indirectly. 

Upon successful completion of the course students will be able to:

•recognize the stages and the historical evolution of the European Union

•understand the institutional role of the European Union’s Institutions

•describe and evaluate the role of the European Union in the tourism sector  

•analyze basic practices of the European Union, emphasizing on tourism development

•use statistical data from the European Union for policy making 

Module Description

The course is organized around topics such as:

•Historical evolution of EU law and policy. 

•Primary legislation (Treaties) and secondary legislation 

•Institutions of the European Union with an emphasis on those who have competence in tourism. 

•Tourism in the European Union. 

•Free provision of services within the European Union, with emphasis on the tourism sector. 

•Provision of conducted tour guide services. 

•Package Tour (travel). 

•Free provision of services in maritime sector (Cabotage) 

•Special tourism issues in the European Union (Eco-label, organized tours). 

•Air transport in the European Union.

•Tourism Statistics the European Union (EUROSTAT) 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Ι. Final Examination (70%) (Summative Evaluation) includes:

-Short answer questions 

-     Topics for elaboration

-    Problem solving (issues concerning EU’s tourism policies)

Evaluation Objective: To understand the fundamentals of the course.

Evaluation Criteria: Comprehensiveness, accuracy, and critical evaluation.

 

ΙΙ. Group Project (10%) (Summative Evaluation) 

A team project will be assigned and presented after completion of the lectures. Students will work together in teams and present a contemporary issue on Tourism within the European Union.

Evaluation Objective:  Examination of students’ progress in relation to learning outcomes, of teamwork spirit and communication skills.

Evaluation Criteria: Critical knowledge, teamwork skills, quality of work, communication skills.

 

ΙII. Individual project (20%)

Two written research assignments will be assigned and explained in a separate handout. 

Evaluation Objective:  Examination of students' progress in relation to learning outcomes, feedback and fine tuning of the course lectures, examination of students’ research skills.

Evaluation Criteria: Quality of written and verbal presentation, quality of content, organization and quality of writing, together with the clarity and organization of their presentation.  

Recommended or required Bibliography

   Book resources:

•Mylonopoulos, D. – Moira, P. (2011). «European Union and Tourism», Nomiki Vivliothiki Publishing, Athens (in Greek).

•Dionysopoulou, P. (2011). European Tourism Policy, Papazisi Publishing (in Greek).

Internet resources:

•Europa.eu  

MARITIME LAW

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: In-Class 
Weekly Hours: Lectures and Workshops-Project Work, 5 (3+2) 
ECTS:
Web Page:
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Learning Outcomes

This course refers to the legal framework of shipping as an economic activity.

The aim of the course’s content is for students to understand the ship’s operation, how it is staffed and exploited. Upon completion of the course students will be able to understand maritime activity and its importance to economy.

 

Upon successful completion of the course students will be able to:

•Understand the significance of the ship for maritime transports and maritime activity’s importance for Greek economy.

•Recognize the types of ships.

•Perceive the particularity of maritime work.

•Manage the operational procedures of maritime activity.

•Be aware of the duties and obligations of a shipping agent and other maritime jobs. 

Module Description

The course is organized around topics such as:

•Legal definition of the ship

•Ownership and registration of the ship

•Maritime documents of the ship

•Legal forms of the ships exploitation.

•Administrative body of shipping

•Staffing the ship and labor unions.

•Chartering and maritime insurance. 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Ι. Final Examination (80%) (Summative Evaluation) includes:

-Multiple choice questions or true

-Topics for elaboration 

 

ΙΙ. Individual project (20%) 

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Recommended Book and Journal Article Resources:

•Mylonopoulos, D. (2012). “Maritime Law, Public and Private”, 2nd ed. Stamoulis Publishing, Athens, (in Greek).

•Poulantzas, N. (2005). “Maritime Law”, Stamoulis Publishing, Athens, (in Greek).

•Antapasis, Ant. (2011). “Private Maritime Law”, Sakkoulas Publishing, Athens, (in Greek). 

Journals:

•Environment and Law

•Law and Nature

HOTEL ACCOUNTING

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: In-Class
Weekly Hours: Lectures and Workshops-Project Work5 (3+2) 
ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The course refers to hotel accounting. The material of the course aims at the students’ familiarity with hotel accounting and the importance of the latter in the development of hotel enterprises. Furthermore, the basic principles, as well as the special characteristics of hotel accounting are also presented to students. Finally, the role of hotel accounting in controlling and correcting hotel enterprises, is also described.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

a)Compose and inform the main courante

b)Manage the accounting information reported in the main courante

c)Evaluate a hotel firm through its accounts

d)Implement activity based cost in hotel firms

e)Analyze the hotel performance and financial position using departmental accounting methods. 

Module Description

The course is organized around topics such as:

1.Accounting Department and procedures of hotel firms

2.Differences between hotel accounting and typical accounting structure – Departmental Accounting.

3.Main courante

4.Hotel accounting entries

5.Indices for the evaluation of hotel firms

6.Hotel budgeting

7.Cost issues for hotel services

8.Corporate governance of Hotel firms 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

I. Final Examination (60%), which includes:

-Multiple choice questions

-Topics for elaboration

 

ΙΙ. Group Projects (40%) 

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Recommended Book Resources:

1.LEKARAKOU, Katerina, 2011. Hotel Accounting. 6th ed. Athens: Pamisos Publishing. (in Greek)

2.KARACHONTZITIS, Dimitris, SARLIS, Kostas, 1989. Hotel Accounting. Athens: Interbooks Publishing. (in Greek)

6.KARDAKARIS, Konstantinos, 2000. Hotel Accounting.Athens: Ellin Publishing. (in Greek) 

8th Semester

PREPARATION AND SUBMISSION OF DISSERTATION

Module Description

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Learning Outcomes

 

Module Description

 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

 

Recommended or required Bibliography

 

WORK EXPERIENCE PROGRAMME

Module Description

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Learning Outcomes

 

Module Description

 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

 

Recommended or required Bibliography

 

LANGUAGE AND COMMUNICATION

Module Description

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Learning Outcomes

 

Module Description

 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

 

Recommended or required Bibliography

 

PROJECTS

Module Description

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Learning Outcomes

 

Module Description

 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

 

Recommended or required Bibliography

 

CULTURE AND TOURISM

Module Description

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Learning Outcomes

 

Module Description

 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

 

Recommended or required Bibliography

 

TOURISM STUDIES

Module Description

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Mode of Delivery:  
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Learning Outcomes

 

Module Description

 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

 

Recommended or required Bibliography