Modules - Department of Civil Engineering

1st Semester

MATHEMATICS I

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Lectures, face-to-face
Weekly Hours:  Lectures: 6
ECTS:  9
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The course’s goal is to make students able to develop critical thought, free their imagination and their creativity.

At the same time helps students to acquire basic notions of elementary Mathematics so they will be able to understand higher Mathematics which are necessary for the completion of their curriculum.

By the successful completion of the course the student will be able to:

- Describe the basic natural notions using Mathematics.

- Recognize and distinguish various methods for solving problems via Mathematics.

- Find solutions in Mathematical problems, explain and apply these solutions from the Mathematical models he /she uses in each area of his/her study.

Module Description

MATHEMATICALANALYSIS I

Functions of real numbers, trigonometrical and hyperbolic functions. The concepts of the limit and continuiy of a real function, fundamental results. Derivatives of real functions, fundamental theorems, Taylor’s formula. Power series. Taylor and Maclaurin series. The Riemann integral of a real-valued function, tests of integrability, properties of the Riemann integral, fundamental results. Basic integration techniques. Applications. Generalized integrals, convergence tests. Applications. Sequences of real numbers, the concept of the limit of a sequence, convergence tests. Series of real numbers, convergence tests.

LINEAR ALGEBRA

Vector calculus, lines and planes in 3-space. The basic surfaces. Matrices, determinants and linear systems. Linear spaces. Linear mappings (basic definitions, the matrix of a linear mapping, the basic geometric transformations, change of basic). Eigenvalues and eigenvectors of linear transformations and matrices (characteristic polynomial, Cayley-Hamilton theorem, matrix diagonalization). Orthogonal and symmetric matrices.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final Written Examination: 100%

Recommended or required Bibliography

 1. ’Mathematics I, differential and integral calculus”, E. Katopodis, A. Makrugiannis, S. Sassalos. Publications: ‘’Synhroni ekdotiki’’, (in Greek).

2. ‘’Mathematics I, algebra and analytic geometry”, E. Katopodis, A. Makrugiannis, S. Sassalos. Publications: ‘’Synhroni ekdotiki’’, (in Greek).

3. ‘’Mathematical Analysis I’’, Th. Rassias, Publications: ‘’Savalas’’ , (in Greek).

PHYSICS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Face to face
Weekly Hours:  Lectures: 2, Laboratory: 3
ECTS:  5
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:

1.  Understand the physics principles and laws which required for the courses of the following semesters. 

2. Use the “physics thinking” for giving solutions in technology applications. 

3. Have the necessary knowledge of the laws of physics governing the applications of civil engineering.

Module Description

Theory:

Principles of Mathematics and Physics, Particles, elementary nuclear physics, -Elementary Astrophysics, interactions, fields and matter, space and time. Elementary Fluid Mechanics (static, dynamic)- Pascal principle, Archimedes principle, surface tension, viscosity, Bernouli’s Law and applications, fluid motion in a tube, law of Poisseuille, Reynolds number. Energy flux- Heat transfer.  

 

Laboratory: 

The first 3 basic theoretical exercises ( measurement errors, graphs, basic measurements). Followed by 10 exercises (viscosity, harmonic oscillation, linear acceleration, sound phenomena, calorimetry, lenses, Conservation of Energy.. Each laboratory exercise is presented by the student with an essay-report with the measurements taken, calculation of the quantities, corresponding graphs and calculation of measurement errors.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final exam: 70%, 

Multiple choice test 10%,

Active participation 10%,  

Laboratory 10%.

Recommended or required Bibliography

1) Young H. D., (1995), University Physics , Published by “Papazisis” (in greek) 

2) Skountzos P- Skountzos A., Metaclassical Physics , 2nd Edition, Macedonian Publishing (in greek)

3) P. Skountzos-G. Moustakakis, Laboratory Exercises in Physics, 4th Edition, Contemporary Publishing(in greek)

4) Alonso M. – Finn E., Elementary University Physics , (in greek)

ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Face-to-face
Weekly Hours:  Lectures: 3, Laboratory: 2
ECTS:  6
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon the successful completion of the course, students  will be able to:

1. Understand the basic principles of General Chemistry.

2. Understand the fundamentals of Environmental Chemistry.

3. Know the basic physical and chemical processes related on their specialization.

4. Have the ability of basic design of wastewater treatment plant.

5. Obtain skills in performing experiments in the Laboratory and ability of statistical processing of the experimental measurements.

Module Description

Theory:

Environmental chemistry. Human population and environment. Main principles of ecology. Atmosphere, atmospheric pollution. Pollution of water. Urban environment, noise pollution, indoor pollution. Urban waste. Industrial waste. Biogeochemical cycles. Introduction to pollution control technologies. Study of distribution and disposal of solid waste. Recycling building materials. Study and basic design of urban sewage treatment plant. Corrosion and protection of metals, alloys, structural steel. Heat transfer, heat losses.

Laboratory:

Statistical processing of measurements. Determinations of physical and chemical characteristics of natural and drinking water (conductivity, pH, solids, hardness, chlorides, dissolved oxygen). Determinations of physical and chemical characteristics of urban and industrial wastewater (chemical oxygen demand, biochemical oxygen demand, concentration of microorganisms, solids, turbidity). Desalination, reverse osmosis. Water recycling. Corrosion and protection of metals and structural steel. Heat transfer, heat losses. 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Theoretical part  60%: Written examination

Laboratory Part  40%: Laboratory reports-homework, Written and Oral examinations

Recommended or required Bibliography

1. Fountoukidis E. (2009). "Laboratory Exercises in Chemical and Environmental Technology". Poukamissas publications, Athens (in Greek)

2. Chryssoulaki C., Panteli D. (1996), Science and Technology of Metallic Materials. Papassotiriou publications, Athens (in Greek) 

3. Mc Cabe W.L., Smith J.C. (1971), Basic chemical engineering processes, TEE  publications, Athens (in Greek) 

4. Smith J. M.  (1999), Chemical Process Engineering, Tziolas publications, Thessaloniki (in Greek)

5. Dietrich T. (2003), Environmental Protection Technology, Ion publications, Athens (in Greek)

6. Valavanidis A., Vlachogianni Th. (2008), Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, University of Athens, Department of Chemistry Edition, Athens (in Greek)

7. Kouimtzis Th., (1998), Environmental Chemistry, University Studio Press publications (in Greek)

8. Williams, Paul T. (1998), Waste treatment and disposal. 

9. Reed, Sherwood C., (1995), Natural systems for waste management and treatment.

10. Freeman, Harry M., (1998), Standard handbook of hazardous waste treatment and disposal

TECHNICAL DRAWING

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Lectures and exercises, face-to-face
Weekly Hours:  Lectures: 2, Laboratory exercises: 4
ECTS:  6
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:

1. Recall the geometric characteristics of the three-dimensional objects.

2. Relate and apply the theory and principles of the methods and steps as to represent the three-dimensional objects in two-dimensional views.

3. Perform the organization of a complete representation of the object under investigation using the professional language of drawing.

4. Analyze the building volumes in basic Euclidian solids and compare them.

5. Combine the engineering drawing lines and other symbols and compose the space volumes represented. 

6. Interpret and compare the objects’ volumes and geometric forms through the information given in the drawings.

7. Be able to work with their fellow students, to create and present both at individual and group level a case study from its initial stages up to the final evaluation.

Module Description

Theory

Common and specific geometrical constructions; notions and terms in plane and solid Euclidean Geometry; Euclidean solids’ description and features.

Methodology of projections according to the Monge’s system (plans, sections, views).

Methodology of axonometric projection. Introduction.

Analysis

1. Geometric solids 1

2. Geometric solids 2

3. Orthogonal projection (plans and views – prisms, right angles)

4. Orthogonal projection (plans and views – prisms, right angles)

5. Orthogonal projection (plans and views – prisms, all angles)

6. Orthogonal projection (plans and views – pyramids, roofs)

7. Orthogonal projection (plans and views – surfaces)

8. Orthogonal projection (sections)

9. Orthogonal projection (sections)

10. Orthogonal projection (sections)

11. Axonometric projection (prisms, isometric)

12. Axonometric projection (pyramids, isometric)

 

Laboratory

Synthesis of Euclidean solids oriented to the architectural and structural design of buildings: drawing of 2D projections according with the Monge’s system (plans, sections, views) and of isometric projection.

Analysis

The laboratory applications have been aligned with the civil engineering practice with emphasis in building forms.

1. Geometric constructions (Plane Geometry)

2.Geometric constructions (Plane Geometry)

3. Orthogonal projection (plans and views – prisms, right angles)

4. Orthogonal projection (plans and views – prisms, right angles)

5. Orthogonal projection (plans and views – prisms, all angles)

6. Orthogonal projection (plans and views – pyramids, roofs)

7. Orthogonal projection (plans and views – surfaces)

8. Orthogonal projection (sections)

9. Orthogonal projection (sections)

10. Orthogonal projection (sections)

11. Axonometric projection (prisms, isometric)

12. Axonometric projection (pyramids, isometric)

13. Isometric plans and sections.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Evaluation language: Greek.

Evaluation procedure

THEORY

- written examination (80%),

- small scale exercises during the lecture’s time (10%),

- small scale research project (10%).

LABORATORY

- written examination (80%),

- laboratory exercise (20%).

All criteria are accessible to the students through website.

Recommended or required Bibliography

In Greek language

Malikouti Stamatina (2011), Methodology and Applications of Technical Drawing, SYGXRONH EKDOTIKH, Athens.

 

Main sources in foreign languages

Aubert Jean (2003), Dessin d’ Architecture: à partir de la géométrie descriptive, Paris: editions de la Villette.  

Giesecke F. – Mitchell A. – Spencer H.C. – Hill I.L. – Loving R.O. – Dygdon J.T. – Novak J. (1998), Engineering Graphics, 6th edition, Prentice Hall: USA.

Hohenberg Fr. (1961), Konstruktive Geometrie in der Technik, 2te Auflage, Springer Verlag: Wien.

Hoischen H. (1984), Technisches Zeichnen, 20te Auflage, W. Girardet: Essen.

Jensen C. (1985), Engineering Drawing and Design, 3rd edition, McGraw Hill: USA.

ENGINEERING GEOLOGY

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Face to Face
Weekly Hours:  Lectures: 2, Laboratory: 2
ECTS:  4
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

This course is an introduction to the basic concepts of geology and engineering geology.

It also introduces students to the main tools and methods of Engineering Geology and the problems (directly and indirectly) that can create the geological conditions in the construction of civil works.

The course also makes an introduction on the appearance causes, and methods of response and management of geological risks.

At the same time, it stimulates the development of a culture closely linked to environmental protection.

The objective of the course is that students are able to: 

1. Identify the main and most common igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks encountered by foundations and construction.

2. To identify and define the main morphological and geological characteristics as shown on maps,

3. Analyse geological parameters important in geotechnical studies.

4. To establish and describe topographical and geological sections,

5. Identify potential geological hazards and various structures and ways of preventing and dealing with them

 

The course is designed so that after successful completion of the course, the future engineers to acquire the necessary knowledge to enable them:

1. To understand issues concerning the geological basement and structure of a region

2. To distinguish the characteristics of the most important geological formations and problems that may arise in the various public works.

3. To describe and interpret the geological structures in the geological maps and cross sections.

4. To assess and appropriately adjust the results of geological study in order to secure construction and operation of a technical project.

5. To receive, analyze and evaluate data and appropriately solve problems both technical and environmental.

6. To thinking novel, creative and using their experience and synthetic thinking to solve problems

7. To exploring appropriate literature, to plan and carry out an individual research or in groups.

Module Description

1. Structure of the planet Earth. Characteristics of the crust mantle and the core.

2. Structure and composition of geological formations. Research methods, properties and classification of rock formations. Creation, classification and basic properties of minerals and rocks.

3. Changes in geological formations. Endogenous processes, tectonic movements of the Earth's crust. Orogenetic procedures and their results. Earthquakes, faults and folds.

4. Effects of active tectonics on the environment and the structures. Methods to prevent catastrophic events and failures.

4. Geological and tectonic evolution of the Greek region. Erosion and corrosion.

5. Development and monitoring of geotechnical works.

6. Measures of prevention and management of geological risks in Greece and worldwide.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination: 60%

Laboratory exercise: 40%

Recommended or required Bibliography

Papanikolaou D. I., Sideris Ch. I. 2007, Geology, the earth science. Athens, Patakis (in Greek).

Koukis C., Sabatakakis N., 2002, Engineering Geology, Patras, (in Greek).

Online Bibliography annually renewed

Laboratory Exercises - Teaching Notes

2nd Semester

MATHEMATICS II

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Lectures and exercises, face-to-face.
Weekly Hours:  Lectures: 4, Laboratory: 2
ECTS:  7
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

MATHEMATICS II aims to enrich students’ abilities in the use of functions of many variables and their integrals, as well to recognize, classify and solve differential equations thus gaining a solid background for their endeavors in their discipline.

Module Description

- MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS II

The Euclidean space  . Functions between Euclidean spaces, limit and continuity of functions. Differentiation of vector-valued functions of a single variable, applications in mechanics and differential geometry, polar, cylindrical and spherical coordinates. Differentiable functions, partial and directional derivative, the concept of differential. Vector fields, gradient-divergence-curl. Fundamental theorems of differentiable functions (mean value theorem, Taylor). Inverse function theorem. Implicit function theorems. Functional dependence. Local and conditional extremes. Double and triple integrals: definitions, integrability criteria, properties. Change of variables, applications. Contour integrals: Contour integral of the first and second kind, contour integrals independent of path, Green’s Theorem.

- DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS

Introduction to differential equations (definitions). First order differential equations (separable variables, total differential and Euler multiplier, linear, Bernoulli, homogeneous Riccati). Qualitative theory of differential equations (general). Higher order linear differential equations (general theory). Linear differential with constant coefficients (solution of linear equations, variation of parameter method, method of undetermined coefficient’s, Euler’s differential equations, applications).

- MATLAB.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination: 60%

Laboratoryexercise: 40%

Optional job preparation and presentation ofup to 24%, less than the proportionofwritten examination

Recommended or required Bibliography

1. “Differential Equations”,  Y.  Georgoudis, A. Paliatsos, N. Prezerakos. Publications: “Sunhroni Ekdotiki”, Eudoxos code 6836, (in Greek).

2. “Differential Equations” Anastasatos, Theodorou, Kouris, Ndrigogias. Publications: ’’Diros publications”, Eudoxos code 47299, (in Greek).

3. “Functions of many variables”, Y. Georgoudis, A. Makrugiannis, S. Sassalos. Publications: “Synhroni Ekdotiki” Eudoxos code 6833, (in Greek).

DESCRIPTIVE GEOMETRY

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Lectures and laboratory exercises, face-to-face
Weekly Hours:  Lectures: 2, Laboratory exercises: 3
ECTS:  5
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:

1. Recall the fundamental concepts of Descriptive Geometry.

2. Relate and apply the theory and principles of Descriptive Geometry methods as to represent the three-dimensional objects in two-dimensional views.

3. Perform the tools and techniques as to solve practical problems in engineering profession.

4. Analyze the problems and produce solutions through visualization and reasoning.

5. Interpret and compare the objects’ volumes and geometric forms through the information given in the drawings.

Module Description

Theory

1-2. Monge system : Parallel and orthogonal projection (prisms, pyramids).

3-4. Monge system: Parallel and orthogonal projection (surfaces, cylinder, cone, sphere, hyperboloid paraboloid)

5-6. Axonometric projection.

7-8-9. Perspective.

10. Intersection of surfaces.

11-12. One-view representation. Roof surfaces.

Laboratory

1. Orthogonal projection – prisms.

2. Orthogonal projection – pyramids.

3. Orthogonal projection – cylinder.

4. Orthogonal projection – cylinder helix.

5. Orthogonal projection – cone.

6. Axonometric projection –I.

7. Axonometric Projection –II.

8. Two-point perspective –I.

9. Two-point perspective –II.

10. Intersection of cylinders.

11. Roofs –I.

12. Roofs –II, III.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Evaluation language: Greek.

Evaluation procedure

THEORY

-written examination (80%),

-small scale exercises during the lecture’s time (20%).

LABORATORY

-Written examination.

-Laboratory work. 

(quality and quantity assessment)

All criteria are accessible to the students through website.

Recommended or required Bibliography

Main sources in Greek language

Leukaditis G. (2006), Representation Methods, Athens.

Leukaditis G. (2010), Perspective, Athens.

Markatis St. (2014), Descriptive Geometry, Athens.

Main sources in foreign languages

  • Aubert J. (2003), Dessin d’ Architecture: à partir de la Géométrie Descriptive, Paris: editions de la Villette.
  • Band E. (2011), Lehrbuch der Darstellende Geometrie, 2 Bände, Paderborn: Salzwasser Verlag. 
  • Faure A. (2009), Géométrie descriptive: Du point aux surfaces de révolution et aux ombres, Paris: Ellipses.
  • Gill R. (1975), Creative Perspective, London: Thames and Hudson.
  • Hohenberg Fr. (1961), Konstruktive Geometrie in der Technik, 2te Auflage, Wien: Springer Verlag. 
  • Holiday-Darr K. (1998), Applied Descriptive Geometry, 2nd edition, USA: Delmar Publishers.
  • Low David Allan (2007), Practical Solid or Descriptive Geometry, 2 volumes, USA: Watchmaker Publishing.
  • Nickel H. - Fucke R. - Kirch K. (2006), Darstellende Geometrie für Ingenieure, Leipzig: Fachbuchverlag Leipzig.
  • Woolf Solomon (2007), An Elementary Course in Descriptive Geometry, USA: Watchmaker Publishing.

QUALITY CONTROL AND TECHNOLOGY OF CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Face-to-face
Weekly Hours:  Lectures: 2, Laboratory: 3
ECTS:  6
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon the successful completion of the course, students  will be able to: 

1. Know the basic construction materials and their properties.

2. Choose and apply the most appropriate for each case materials.

3. Solves most of the problems have learned.

4. Check the quality and suitability of construction materials

Module Description

Theory:

Introduction: Historical and economic development of construction materials. Criteria for the selection and suitability of materials. Physical, chemical, mechanical, thermal, acoustic and electromagnetic properties of materials.

Standardization in building materials: Standardization, controlling, testing. Material specifications. European standards.

Rocks and natural stones: Geological distinction, mineralogical composition, controlling and testing of rocks. Categories of stones. Marble. Causes of destruction, means of protection and maintenance of natural stones.

Aggregates: Origin, production, mining, processing, classification. Characteristic properties. Sieve analysis. Regulations for standard curves. Suitability, controlling, testing of aggregates. Correction of characteristics of aggregate mixtures. Fineness modulus of aggregates. Special categories of aggregates. Computational exercises in aggregates.

Binders: Categories. Production methods. Mechanisms of setting and hardening. Current regulations. Clays. Lime. Magnesite cement. Plaster. Resins. Cement. Production. Mechanisms of setting and hardening. Controlling and testing. Cement Regulations. Special cement categories.

Mortars: Categories, composition, properties, characteristics. Suitability criteria. Controlling and testing. Specifications - Regulations.

Concrete: Categories of concrete. Classification criteria. Cement and aggregates used. Raw material for concrete. Concrete Technology Regulation. Concrete mix design calculations. Physicomechanical and chemical properties of concrete. Control methods. Workability of concrete and calculation methods. Penetration Test, Vebe.

Concrete durability: carbonation mechanisms, penetration of chlorides, sulfate reactions, exposure to high temperatures, alkali-silica reaction in relation to the vulnerability of aggregates. Corrosion, technological measures for protection and prevention of corrosion mechanisms, rehabilitation methods for construction.

Special concrete: High performance concrete, ready mix concrete (properties - applications). Lightweight concrete. Raw materials. Properties and applications of lightweight concrete. Controlling. Regulations. Calculations for mix design of lightweight concrete.

Metallic construction materials: Criteria for the evaluation of materials. Classification. Structure. Iron - carbon alloys. Production, processing. Structural steel categories. Controlling. Structural steel testing. Aluminum. Linking of metal parts (bolting - riveting, welding). Corrosion of metallic materials.

Laboratory:

Aggregates: Quartering method for aggregates sampling. Sieve analysis and grading composition of aggregates. Determination of bulk density, specific gravity, coefficient of mass and porosity of aggregates. Determination of moisture content and water absorption of aggregates. Determination of specific gravity and water absorption of coarse and fine aggregates. Sand purity control, equivalent test. Determination of filler content. Correction in sieve analysis of aggregates.

Metallic Materials: Thermal analysis, phase diagrams of alloys. Determination of hardness according to Brinell, Vickers, and Rockwell methods. Metallography, grain size. Steels. Tension under static loading. Proportionality, elastic, yield, fracture limits. Reduced conventional elongation at maximum load, hardening ratio, toughness.

Concrete: Sampling, temperature, workability, apparent weight and air content of fresh compacted concrete. Conventional compressive strength. Planning, design and laboratory testing of concrete mix design.

Cement: setting time, fineness, specific gravity, specific surface, compressive strength to fracture, volume stability of ring and autoclave.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Theoretical part  60%:  Written examination

Laboratory Part  40%:  Laboratory reports-homework, Written examination

Recommended or required Bibliography

1. A. Triantafyllou, Construction Materials, 7th Ed., Patra, 2005 (in Greek)

2. Collective Laboratory Course Notes, Quality Control and Technology of Construction Materials, Piraeus, Athens, 2012 (in Greek)

3. R. Wendehorst, Building Materials, 2nd Ed., M. Giourdas publications, Athens, 1981 (in Greek)

4. S. Tsimas, S. Tsilivis, Science and technology of cement, NTUA, Athens, 1999(in Greek) 

5. S. Tsilivis, S. Tsimas, Exercises of Cement Technology (Notes), NTUA, Athens, 1994 (in Greek)

6. G. Parisakis, B. Kaselouri, pp. Tsimas, Ch. Ftikos, Chemistry and Technology of Cement, NTUA, Athens, 1992 (in Greek) 

7. Ch. Ftikos, Science and Technology of Ceramic Materials , NTUA, Athens, 2000 (in Greek) 

8. C. Chryssoulakis, D. Pantelis, Science and Technology of Metallic Materials, Papasotiriou publications, Athens, 1996 (in Greek)

9. E. Banteka, Elements of Physical Metallurgy, Symmetria publications , Athens, 1991 (in Greek)

10. Th. Skoulikidis, P. Vassiliou, Corrosion and Protection of Materials, Simeon publications, Athens, 1994 (in Greek)

11. J. F. Shackelford, Introduction to Material Science for Engineers, 5th ed., Prentice Hall, New Jersey, 2000

12. W. F. Smith, Principles of Materials Science and Engineering, 3rd ed., Mc Graw-Hill, New York, U.S.A., 1995

13. G. D. Taylor, Materials in Construction – Principles, Practice and Performance, Pearson Education, U.K., 2002

14. S. Somayaji, Civil Engineering Materials, 2nd ed., Prentice-Hall, New Jersey, U.S.A., 2001

15. M. S. Mamlouk, J. P. Zaniewski, Materials for Civil and Construction Engineers, 2nd Ed., Pearson Education, New Jersey, U.S.A., 2006

16. R. A. Flinn, P. K. Trojan, Engineering Materials and their Applications, 4th ed., Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, U.S.A., 1990

17. P. C. Hewlett, Lea’s Chemistry of Cement and Concrete, 4th ed., Edward Arnold, London, 1998

18. H. F. W. Taylor, Cement Chemistry, 2nd ed., Thomas Telford Publishing, London, U.K., 1997

19. M. S. J. Gani, Cement and Concrete, Chapman & Hall, London, U.K., 1997

20. S. N. Gosh, Cement and Concrete Science and Technology, Vol. I Part I, ABI Books Pvt., New Delhi, India, 1991

21. S. N. Gosh, Cement and Concrete Science and Technology, Vol. I Part II, ABI Books Pvt., New Delhi, India, 1992

22. S. L. Sharkar, S. N. Gosh, Mineral Admixtures in Cement and Concrete, Vol.4, ABI Books Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi, India, 1993

23. S. Mindess, J. F. Young, D. Darwin, Concrete, 2nd ed., Pearson Education, New Jersey, U.S.A., 2003

24. A. M. Neville, Properties of Concrete, 4th ed., Pearson Education, London, U.K., 2004

25. Y. Chiang, D. P. Birnie, W. D. Kingery, Physical Ceramics, John Wiley & Sons Inc., New York, U.S.A., 1997

26. J. S. Reed, Principles of Ceramic Processing, 2nd ed., John Wiley & Sons Inc., New York, U.S.A., 1995

27. R. H. Doremus, Glass Science, 2nd ed., John Wiley & Sons Inc., New York, U.S.A., 1994

28. R. A. Higgins, Engineering Metallurgy, 6th ed., Edward Arnold, 1993

29. D. A. Jones, Principles and Prevention of Corrosion, 2nd ed., Prentice-Hall, New Jersey, U.S.A., 1996

30. H. E. Desch, Timber - Its Structure, Properties Conservation and Use, 7th ed., Macmillan, London, U.K., 1996

31. W. M. C. McKenzie, Design of Structural Timber, Macmillan, London, U.K., 2000

32. N. G. McCrum, C. P. Buckley, C. B. Bucknall, Principles of Polymer Engineering, 2nd ed., Oxford University Press, New York, U.S.A., 2004

33. F. L. Matthews, R. D. Rawlings, Composite Materials: Engineering and Science, Chapman & Hall, London, U.K., 1994

34. K. K. Chawla, Composite Materials, Science and Engineering, 2nd ed., Springer-Verlag, New York, U.S.A., 1998

35. J. R. Panck, J. P. Cook, Construction Sealants and Adhesives, 2nd ed., John Wiley & Sons Inc., New York, U.S.A. 1984

INTRODUCTION TO ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Lectures (for theoretical background strengthening) and exercises, face-to-face.
Weekly Hours:  Laboratory exercises: 4
ECTS:  4
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, the successful student will be able to:

1. Recall the principles and methods of Technical Drawing techniques. 

2. Explain the various symbols in architectural drawings relating them with the necessary acknowledgements in the scale 1:50.  

3. Apply the methodology of describing the three-dimensional objects in two-dimensional views in the built environment scale.

4. Organize a complete presentation file of the architectural design of a building in a scale 1:50 using the professional language of drawing and the appropriate dimensions of usual construction elements.

5. Analyze and combine the functional requirements of a dwelling and answer the basic organization of the interior space following the anthropometric data.

6. Interpret and compare the construction and architectural elements dimensions in the scale 1:50

Module Description

Modules

Introduction to the basic construction parts of a building; plans, sections and views; methodology, symbols and simplifications in the 1:50 scale.

Anthropometrics and Ergonomics; analysis and synthesis in house shells.

General design outlines during the project of a two-storey (with basement and terrace) house. Drawing of basic bioclimatic features (Trombe wall, sun-blinds, categories of plants according with the building orientation, green roofs). 

Drawing methodology for staircases. 

Analysis

1-2. Plan, sections and views of a 1-storey traditional house, typical of Cyclades’ islands (bearing structure: stone /terrace). 

3-4. Plan, sections and views of a 2-storey traditional house, typical of the mainland of Greece (bearing structure: stone /roof /basement/staircase). 

5-6-7. Plan, sections and views of a 1-storey modern house (bearing structure: reinforced concrete). Organization of the interior according with the anthropometric data and the ergonomic standards.

8-9-10-11-12. Plan, sections and views of a 2-storey modern house with basement (bearing structure: reinforced concrete). Organization of the interior according with the anthropometric data and the ergonomic standards. Drawing of basic bioclimatic features.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Evaluation language: Greek.

Evaluation procedure

-written examination (80%) –problem solving,

-laboratory work (20%).

All criteria are accessible to students through the open courses

Recommended or required Bibliography

Main sources in Greek language

Athanasopoulos C. (2007), Building Construction: Synthesis and Technology, Athens.

Main sources in foreign language

Allen Edward (1999), Fundamentals of Building Construction Materials and Methods, John Wiley & Sons: NY.

Ambrose J. edit. (1992), Construction Details, from Architectural Graphic Standards, The American Institute of Architects, John Wiley & Sons: NJ.

Baden-Powell C. (2001), Architect’s Pocket Book, 2nd edition, Elsevier: UK.

Ching F. (2012), A Visual Dictionary of Architecture, 4th edition, John Wiley & Sons: NJ.

Ching F.-Onouye B.-Zuberbuhler D. (2014), Building Structures Illustrated. Patterns, Systems, and Design, 2nd edition, John Wiley & Sons: NJ.

Croney J. (1971), Anthropometrics for designers, NY: van Nostrand Reinhold Co.

Goldsmith S. (2000), Universal Design. A Practical Guidance for Architects, Routledge: UK.

Royal Institute of British Architects (2011), A guide for assisting living “towards LifeHome 21”, UK: RIBA.

Simpson Ian (1994), The encyclopaedia of drawing techniques, London: Headline Books.

MECHANICS I

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Lectures, laboratories , distance learning methods 
Weekly Hours:  Lectures: 4, Laboratory: 2
ECTS:  8
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, students will be able to :

1. Deeply understand the theory of Structural Mechanics.

2. Study and suggest solutions in problems of Structural Mechanics.

3. Develop personal responsibility and offer scientific opinion.

4. Manage time in an appropriate manner.

5. Develop analytical and synthetic abilities as well as critical evaluation.

6. Present ideas verbally or in written.

Specifically, students will be able to:

1. Understand and utilize the basic principles of Mechanics.

2. Evaluate the centroid of gravity and moments of area of plane shapes.

3. Apply equilibrium equations in structures.

4. Evaluate the redundancy of bar structures.

5. Analyze simple isostatic structures (cantilevers, simply supported beams, continuous beams with internal hinges).

6. Construct axial force, shear force, and bending moment diagrams.

Module Description

1. Basic concepts of Mechanics. Force. Moment. 

2. Systems of solid bodies.

3. Force composition and static equilibrium in two and three dimensions. 

4. Centroid of gravity of solid bodies and plane shapes. 

5. First and second moment of area. Moment of resistance. 

6. Friction. 

7. Introduction to Statics. 

8. Types of structures, supports, internal and external forces. 

9. Statically determinate and statically indeterminate structures. 

10. Analysis of cantilevers.

11. Analysis of simply supported beams and frames.

12. Diagrams of internal forces.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination: 60%

Laboratory 40% of the total mark

The evaluation of the laboratory is done by weekly assignments (30% of the laboratory mark) and by written exams  (70% of the laboratory mark)

Recommended or required Bibliography

1. Arapostathis N, Arapostathis D. Mechanics 1. Ion, 2003.(IN GREEK)

2. Fountas. Structural Mechanics 1. Fountas, 2000.(IN GREEK)

3rd Semester

HYDRAULICS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Lectures and exercises, face-to-face. 
Weekly Hours:  Lectures: 2, Laboratory Exercises: 2
ECTS:  5
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, students will be able to: 

1. In-depth knowledge and critical understanding of theory and laws of Fluid Mechanics with emphasis on Hydraulics.

2. Knowledge and familiarity in units conversion, dimensions, physical properties of fluids, hydrostatic applications, etc.

3. Knowledge and skills in order to design flow field systems based on hydraulic losses.

4. Knowledge and composition skills, in solving and computation applications in the scientific field of hydraulic pipes and open channels.

5. Capacities to assessing different proposals in order to solve complex issues concerning the fluids flow and energy in hydraulic pipes and open channels.

6. To describe and recognize the physical quantities and parameters that involved in problems related to Hydraulics.

7. To apply the principles of Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulics, as well as the appropriate equations in order to calculate the energy conversions of fluids in problems related to Hydraulics.

8. To combines the theoretical knowledge and the laboratory experience in order to use experimental devices for experimental calculations of some parameters involved to Hydraulics.

9. To combines, to design and to develop any troubleshooting process in the area of Hydraulics.

10. To be able to explain the “behavior” of fluids under different flow conditions, in closed (hydraulic pipes) and open channels.

11. To calculate, evaluate and compare the energy losses in the flow of fluids in hydraulic pipes and open channels.

Module Description

Theory

The core modules of the course include:

1. Units Systems and size Dimensions, Dimensional Analysis.

2. Physical Properties of fluids. Density, viscosity, kinematic viscosity, surface tension, compressibility, gas laws.

3. Hydrostatic Pressure, Pressure intensity-basic equation of hydrostatic, hydrostatic forces on surfaces.

4. Kinematics of Fluids. Flow lines and trajectories, total derivative time, equations of fluids motions (Euler’s equations), Bernoulli’s equation, energy height, piezometric height.

5. Permanent one dimensional incompressible flow in closed pipes.  Reynolds number, laminar and turbulent flow in closed pipes.

6. Hydraulic load. Moody chart. Linear energy losses. Local energy losses. Overall hydraulic losses.

7. Steady flow in open channels. Features of flow in open channels.

8. Basic flow equations in open channels. Chezy equation. Manning-Strickler equation.

9. Tanks. The problem of the three tanks.

10. Hydraulic jump. General characteristics of hydraulic jump.

Laboratory

The workshop includes the following laboratory exercises:

1. Calculation of errors in the process of experimental measurements and during the calculation of derived magnitudes

2. Experimental measurement of liquids density and specific gravity 

3. Capillary-capillary elevation

4. Experimental measurement of fluids viscosity

5. Experimental calculation of pressure center on a flat vertical surface

6. Venturi duct

7. Experimental calculation of the critical Reynolds number

8. Experimental calculation of losses in the fluid flow conduit

9. Flow through nozzle with sharp edges

10. Open channel flow. Experimental determination of flow speed and roughness coefficient

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Theory:

• Final Written Examination: 80%

• Three at least interim exams (advance): 20%

Laboratory:

• Weekly laboratory work-exercise: 40%

• Final written semester examination: 60%

Recommended or required Bibliography

1. Streeter V.L. (1966). Fluid Mechanics. 4th edition, McGraw - hill.

2. Davis C.V. and Sorensen V.E. (1969). Handbook of applied Hydraulics. International Student Edition, McGraw – Hill.

3. Giles R.V. (1999). Theory and Problems of Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulics. McGraw – Hill, Schaum’s Outline Series.

4. Koronakis P. (2001). Fluid Mechanics. ION publications, Athens, Greece (in Greek).

5. Moustris K. and Ntourou K. (2013). Laboratory Guide and Academic notes. TEI of Piraeus, Egaleo, Athens, Greece (in Greek).

6. Keramaris E. and Pechlivanidis G. (2008). Hydraulics II. TEI of Thessaloniki, Free online-web Hydraulics Academic notes, Available at:

   http://eclass.cie.teithe.gr/claroline/document/document.php

7. Moutsopoulos K. (2008). Applied Hydraulics-Short theory and exercises. University of Thessaloniki, Free online-web Hydraulics Academic notes, Available at:   http://repository.edulll.gr/edulll/bitstream/10795/1296/22/1296_01.pdf

8. Papaevagelou G. (2009).  Principals of Hydraulics. TEI of Serres, Free online-web Hydraulics Academic notes, Available at: http://blogs.sch.gr/geopapaevan/files/2009/08/shmeioseis_general_3.pdf

BUILDING INSTALLATIONS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Face-to-face
Weekly Hours:  Lectures: 4
ECTS:  5
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The objective of the course is to help the student :

• to obtain a profound and complete knowledge of modern technology applied to building installations. Specifically, to get familiar with the main types of building installations and the relative regulations applied. 

• to be able to recognize the components of a building installation. 

• to understand the calculations which have to be made and the selection criteria which have to be applied in order to have the optimum selection, construction and synthesis of the above components.

• to be able to design building installations 

Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

• Understand the basics and individual characteristics of Building  installations.

• Study and management of buildings installations.

• Evaluate comparing different systems applicable to building installations.

• Analyzes and calculates the basics and components of a building installation.

Specifically, students will be able to:

• To describe and identify the parts, to choose the functions and operations of a  building installation.

• To explain the operation of a building installation, to assess performance and to calculate the operating parameters.

Module Description

PART A:  Mechanical Installations

• Interior Water Supply and Sewerage   installations of buildings. 

• Natural Gas Applications in Buildings.Basics. 

• Standards and regulations. Definitions. 

• Basic components. Basic Calculations – Understanding of Mechanical Installations Designs

PART B:  Electrical Installations

• Introduction to electrical installations. Basics. Standards and regulations. Regulation ELOT HD 384. 

• Classification of electrical installations. Definitions. Basic components.

• Safety. Dangers and safety from electrocution. 

• Conductors and wires. Pipes and components. 

• Control, safety and outage devices. Voltage and current diversion switches. 

• Boards of low voltage electrical installations. 

• Ground of residences and business premises. 

• Basics on study, design and construction of low voltage electrical installations.  

• Basic Lighting Circuits. Connections of fluorescent lamps. 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination: 100%

Recommended or required Bibliography

1. Χαρώνης Παν. / Μηχανολογικές εγκαταστάσεις κτιρίων, τόμος Α’ / έκδοση σύγχρονη εκδοτική / 2003 / ISBN 9608165-53.

2. Χαρώνης Παν. / Μηχανολογικές εγκαταστάσεις κτιρίων, τόμος B’ / έκδοση σύγχρονη εκδοτική / 2003 / ISBN 9608165-53.

3. Παπανίκας Δ. Γ., Τεχνολογία φυσικού αερίου, Εκδ. Vortex, 1997.

4. Μαχιά Απ./Ηλεκτρομηχανολογικές εγκαταστάσεις / έκδοση ιδίου / 1977.

5. Stein B.-Reynolds J. / Mechanical and electrical equipment for buildings / έκδοση J. Wiley / 1392 ISBN 0-471-52502-2.

6. Sage K. / Εγχειρίδιο εσωτερικών εγκαταστάσεων, τόμος 182 / έκδοση Γκιούρδας / 1971.

7. Schulz K. / οικιακές εγκαταστάσεις υγιεινής / έκδοση Παπασωτηρίου.

8. Βιάζης Γ. Α., Πυροπροστασία - νομοθεσία, μελέτες, Εκδ. Παπασωτηρίου, 1998.

9. Λέφας Κ. Χ., Εισαγωγή στην τεχνολογία του φυσικού αερίου, Εκδ. Φοίβος, 1991.

10. Σελλούντος Β., Πυρασφάλεια: Εφαρμοσμένη πυροπροστασία και στοιχεία πυρόσβεσης, Εκδ. Φοίβος,1995.

11. Τρουλλινάκης Ν., Τριβέλλας Σ., Θερμοϋδραυλικές Εγκαταστάσεις, Εκδ. Ίων, 1999.

12. Handbook of Solid Waste Management, McGraw Hill, 2001.

13. Brickle S., Θερμοϋδραυλικές Εγκαταστάσεις, Ευρωπαϊκές Τεχνολογικές Εκδ., 1999.

14. Bruenner H., Ο εγκαταστάτης δικτύων αερίων καυσίμων & νερού, Τεχνοεκδοτική, 1997.

15. Eckenfelder HC, 2000, Industrial Water Pollution Control, McGraw Hill, 2000.

16. Β. Μπιτζιώνη, (2008), ΣΥΓΧΡΟΝΕΣ ΗΛΕΚΤΡΙΚΕΣ ΕΓΚΑΤΑΣΤΑΣΕΙΣ,  Τζιόλα

17. Ν. Κιμουλάκης, (2006), ΚΤΙΡΙΑΚΕΣ ΗΛΕΚΤΡΙΚΕΣ ΕΓΚΑΤΑΣΤΑΣΕΙΣ,  Παπασωτηρίου

18. Στ. Τουλόγλου, (2004), ΗΛΕΚΤΡΙΚΕΣ ΕΓΚΑΤΑΣΤΑΣΕΙΣ ΚΤΙΡΙΩΝ , ΙΩΝ

19. Απ. Μαχιά, ΜΕΛΕΤΗ και ΣΧΕΔΙΑΣΗ ΗΛΕΚΤΡΙΚΩΝ ΕΓΚΑΤΑΣΤΑΣΕΩΝ , Εκδόσεις:ΣΥΜΕΩΝ

20. Ν. Κιμουλάκη, (2006), ΚΤΙΡΙΑΚΕΣ ΗΛΕΚΤΡΙΚΕΣ ΕΓΚΑΤΑΣΤΑΣΕΙΣ, Εκδόσεις ΠΑΠΑΣΩΤΗΡΙΟΥ

21. Σημειώσεις διδασκόντων.

CONSTRUCTION DETAILS I

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Lectures, laboratories
Weekly Hours:  Lectures: 2, Laboratory: 4
ECTS:  6
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, students will have:

1. In-depth knowledge and critical understanding of the technological methods to be applied, 

2. Knowledge and skills in understanding the constructional techniques, as well as applying them in different projects, 

3. Knowledge and synthesis skills in regards to the engineering part, as well as the design procedure of each construction, 

4. Ability to programming and supervision of the working phases that each project undergoes.

Specifically, students will be able to:

1. To choose the particular construction techniques and to be able to focus on the specifications as given by the engineering industry.

2. To develop their personal criteria in regards to choosing the specialized materials and their applications in constructions. 

3. To proceed in suggesting quality improvement techniques.

4. To know and apply the rules and recommendations related to environmental protection, as related to new constructions.

Module Description

1. Introduction to general constructions using new technologies

2. Control and optimization of structural proposals

3. Principles in regards to the environment surrounding the construction 

4. Methodology regarding the site preparation

5. General planning of the construction field and its safety measurements

6. Design, Operation and Management of Construction sites.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination: 60%

Laboratory exercise:  40%

Recommended or required Bibliography

1. Αθανασόπουλος Χρήστος Γ., Κατασκευή Κτιρίων, Σύνθεση και Τεχνολογία, ιδιωτική έκδοση, Αθήνα 1997.

2. Schmitt Heinrich, Heene Andreas, Κτιριακές κατασκευές, εκδόσεις Γκιούρδας, Αθήνα, 1994.

MECHANICS II

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Face-to-face lectures, laboratories 
Weekly Hours:  Lectures: 4, Laboratory: 2
ECTS:  8
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The course introduces the student to the concepts of Strength of Materials. 

The objective of the course is that the student understands the fundamental principles of mechanics and the various kinds of stresses and types of failure. The student must be able to calculate the stresses and strains of different load combinations and acquire the knowledge of the mechanics of deformable bodies.

Upon successful completion of this course the student is able to use mathematical tools to calculate the internal stresses and deformations caused to various loads.

Module Description

Tension and compression of simple and compound bars. Hooke’s law, Poisson’s ratio. Compatibility equations. Equations of equilibrium. Simple indeterminate structures. Shear. Evaluation of stress and strain to members under shear forces. Plane stress (tensile and shear stresses, principal stresses and directions, Mohr’s circle of stresses, differential equilibrium equations). Plane strain (strain, rotation, principal stresses, Mohr’s circle of strains, compatibility relations). Elastic behaviour (3D state of stress, constitutive equations for isotropic materials). Properties of the strain and stress tensors. Stress-strain relations. Principal stress.  Elastic beam bending theory and introduction to plastic behaviour of bending beams. Simple bending of composite beams. Torsion. The principle of Saint-Venant. Prismatic bodies subjected to pure torsion. Buckling of elastic structures. Evaluation of critical buckling load of simple members.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination: 60%

Laboratory 40% of the total mark

The evaluation of the laboratory is done by weekly assignments (30% of the laboratory mark) and by written exams  (70% of the laboratory mark)

Recommended or required Bibliography

 

  • Beer F.P., Johnson E. R. (1981), ‘‘Mechanics of Materials’’, McGraw-Hill Publishing Company.
  • Grandall S., Dahl N., Lardner (1978), ‘‘An Introduction to the Mechanics of Solids’’, McGraw-Hill Publishing Company.
  • Nash W. A. (1957), ‘‘Theory and Problems of Strength of Materials’’, Schaum Publishing Company, New York.
  • Timoshenko S., (1940),  ‘‘Strength of Materials Part I Elementary Theory and Problems’’,, D. Van Nostrand Company Inc., Princeton, New Jersey, 2nd Ed.
  • Timoshenko S., (1956),  ‘‘Strength of Materials Part II Advanced Theory and Problems’’,, D. Van Nostrand Company Inc., Princeton, New Jersey, 3rd Ed.
  • Timoshenko S., Young D. H. (1962),  ‘‘Elements of Strength of Materials’’,, D. Van Nostrand Company Inc., Princeton, New Jersey, 4th  Ed.
  • Tiomosenko S., Gere J. M. (1973), ‘‘Mechanics of Materials’’, D. Van Nostrand, London.
  • Tiomosenko S. (1978), ‘‘An Introduction to the Mechanics of Solids’’, McGraw-Hill Publishing Company.

 

 

Greek bibliography

 

  • Ανδριανόπουλος Ν., Κυριαζής Γ. και  Λιακόπουλος Μ. (1991), ‘‘Πειραματική Αντοχή Υλικών’’, Εκδόσεις Άρης Συμεών.
  • Βουθούνης Π. (2002), ‘‘Τεχνική Μηχανική Αντοχή των Υλικών’’, Αθήνα.
  • Βουθούνης Π. (2002), ‘‘Μηχανική του Παραμορφωσίμου Στερεού Ι - Αντοχή των Υλικών - Ασκήσεις’’, Αθήνα.
  • Γδούτος Ε. (2004), ‘‘Αντοχή των Υλικών’’, Εκδόσεις Μ. Αθανασοπούλου-Σ.Αθανασόπουλος Ο.Ε.
  • Θεοχάρη  Π. Σ., (1961), ‘‘Μηχανική Αντοχή Υλικών’’, Εκδόσεις ΕΜΠ.
  • Κακαβάς Π. και Λέμης Π. (2008), ‘‘Τεχνολογία δομικών υλικών’’, Εκδόσεις Ζήτη Πελαγία & ΣΙΑ Ο.Ε.
  • Κερμανίδης Θ.  (2009), ‘‘Αντοχή Υλικών 1’’, Εκδόσεις Εταιρεία Αξιοποίησης και Διαχείρισης Περιουσίας Πανεπιστημίου Πατρών.
  • Κερμανίδης Θ.  (2009), ‘‘Αντοχή Υλικών 2’’, Εκδόσεις Εταιρεία Αξιοποίησης και Διαχείρισης Περιουσίας Πανεπιστημίου Πατρών
  • Κουτρουμάνου - Σερέφογλου Ε. (1995), ‘‘Αντοχή Υλικών. Θεωρία, Εφαρμογές, Εργαστήριο’’, Εκδόσεις  Στέλλα Παρίκου & Σια Ο.Ε.
  • Κωνσταντέλλος Β. (2009), ‘‘Πειραματική Αντοχή Υλικών’’, Αθήνα.
  • Μαρκέτος Ε., (1998), ‘‘Τεχνική Μηχανική ΙΙ, Αντοχή των Υλικών’’, Μ. Αθανασοπούλου-Σ. Αθανασόπουλος Ο.Ε..
  • Μυλωνάς Κ., (1982), ‘‘Μηχανική Παραμορφωτών Σωμάτων Ι, ΙΙ’’, Εκδόσεις Άρης Συμεών.
  • Πανταλέων Ε. (2010), ‘‘Αντοχή υλικών’’, Εκδόσεις Γ. Φούντας
  • Παπαδόπουλος Β. Γ. και Βαδαλούκας Β. Γ. (2009), ‘‘Μηχανική των υλικών’’, Εκδόσεις Αφοι Βαδαλούκα Σύμβουλοι Μηχανικοί.
  • Πανταλέων Ε. (2010), ‘‘Αντοχή υλικών’’, Εκδόσεις Γ. Φούντας.
  • Παπαμίχος Ε. και Χαραλαμπάκης Ν. (2004), ‘‘Αντοχή των υλικών’’, Εκδόσεις Α. Τζιολα & Υιοι Α.Ε.
  • Πρασιανάκης Ι., Κωνσταντέλλος Β. και Μηλιός Ι. (1988), ‘‘Πειραματική Αντοχή Υλικών’’, Εκδόσεις Άρης Συμεών,.
  • Πρασιανάκης Ι. και Κουρκούλης Σ. (1999), ‘‘Πειραματική Αντοχή Υλικών’’, Εκδόσεις Μ. Αθανασοπούλου- Σ. Αθανασόπουλος Ο.Ε.
  • Σωτηροπούλου Α., Πασσά Δ. (2009), ‘‘Αντοχή Υλικών - Εργαστηριακές Eφαρμογές’’, Εκδόσεις  Στέλλα Παρίκου & Σια Ο.Ε.
  • Τσαμασφύρος Γ. (1991), ‘‘Μηχανική Παραμορφωσίμων Σωμάτων Ι’’, Εκδόσεις  Συμμετρία.
  • Τσαμασφύρος Γ. (1991), ‘‘Μηχανική Παραμορφωσίμων Σωμάτων ΙΙ’’, Εκδόσεις  Συμμετρία.
  • Τσαμασφύρος Γ., Δήμου Γ. (1991), ‘‘Μηχανική Παραμορφωσίμων Σωμάτων Ι – Προβλήματα - Ασκήσεις’’, Αθήνα.
  • Φούντας Γ. (2007), ‘‘Αντοχή των Υλικών, Τόμος Ι και ΙΙ’’, Εκδόσεις Γ. Φούντας.
  • Φούντας Γ. (1995), ‘‘Πειραματική Αντοχή Υλικών, Τόμος Ι και ΙΙ’’, Εκδόσεις Γ. Φούντας.
  • Χαραλαμπάκης Ν. (2004), ‘‘Αντοχή υλικών και δομικών στοιχείων’’, Εκδόσεις Α. Τζιολα & Υιοι Α.Ε.
  • Herr Horst (1999), ‘‘Τεχνική Μηχανική και Αντοχή Υλικών’’, Εκδόσεις Γ.&Σ. Παρίκου & Σια Ε.Ε.
  • Nash W. (1988), ‘‘Αντοχή των Υλικών’’, Εκδόσεις ): ΕΣΠΙ Εκδοτική.

 

TOPOGRAPHY

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Lectures, laboratories , distance learning methods 
Weekly Hours:  Lectures: 2, Laboratory: 3
ECTS:  6
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, students will have:

1. In-depth knowledge and critical understanding of the theory and principles of the use of new technologies and information systems in site surveying. 

2. Knowledge and skills in topography. 

Specifically, topics covered:

Introduction and  terminology; Simple survey techniques and area calculation; Geodetic instruments and methods of distance measurements;  Geodetic instruments and methods of angle measurements; Geodetic instruments and methods of levelling; Global Navigation Satellite Systems; Datum, map projections; Basic geodetic problems; Triangulation.

Module Description

  1. Introduction and  terminology
  2. Simple survey techniques and area calculation
  3. Geodetic instruments and methods of distance measurements
  4. Geodetic instruments and methods of distance measurements
  5. Geodetic instruments and methods of angle measurements
  6. Geodetic instruments and methods of angle measurements
  7. Geodetic instruments and methods of levelling.
  8. Geodetic instruments and methods of levelling.
  9. Global Navigation Satellite Systems.
  10. Datum, map projections
  11. Basic geodetic problems.
  12. Basic geodetic problems.
  13. Triangulation
  14. Triangulation

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination: 60%

Laboratory exercise: 40%

Recommended or required Bibliography

Graikoysis, G., Lagos Α. Principles of Survey and Geoinformation. Synchroni Ekdotiki,Athens, 2011 (in Greek).

Badelas, Savaidis,Yfantis and Doukas, Geodesy, Kyriakidis’ Publ., Thessalloniki, 2005 (in Greek)

Χ. Ι. Kaltsikis, Α. Fotiou , Genaral Survey: Instruments - measurements –evaluations-rendering, Ziti publ., Thessaloniki, 1990 (in Greek)

G.D. Georgopoulos, Survey lectures, Tziola publ.,Thessaloniki, 2006 (in Greek)

Ι.Ν.Chatzopoulos, Survey, Giourda publ., Athens, 2005 (in Greek)

Lev M. Bugayevskiy, John P. Snyder , Map projections : a reference manual, London ; Philadelphia : Taylor & Francis, 1998

4th Semester

CONSTRUCTION LEGISLATION

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  
Weekly Hours:  
ECTS:  
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

 

Module Description

 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

 

Recommended or required Bibliography

 

COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Lectures, laboratories , distance learning methods
Weekly Hours:  Laboratory: 4
ECTS:  4
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Students at the end of their studies have a depth knowledge of geometric and stereometric concepts and are able to create not only two-dimensional drawings and three-dimensional models.

Also delve into solid processing techniques in order to be able to formulate the final model.

Should students in the end of the semester to be able to integrate digital not only an architectural project digital and the 'then transfer to the paper, two-dimensional and three-dimensional form, but they have to apply to their three-dimensional model materials, light from different light sources, etc.  in order to creating proper presentations.

Familiar with the three-dimensional design through PC can very quickly create illustrations that 'unlike ordinary design performance and imaging methods that do not use any software.

In 'conclusion should be able become familiar (in minimum time) to the usage of any design program and use it as a tool to produce any architectural project.

Upon completion of the course, students will have:

In depth knowledge of geometrical and stereometrical meanings and implementation of those concepts (especially stereo-metrical) through designing of two and three dimension models. 

Knowledge and drawing skills of two-dimensional and three-dimensional shapes

In depth knowledge of CAD programs and the ability to select the proper software according to their needs

Ability to create realistic images of their model and present their project properly.

The students after this course should be able to:

1. Understand any shape

2. Analyze any geometrical object to the sub objects that makes it up and recreate the model from them. 

3. Distinguish stereometrical models knowing their properties.

4. Synthesize 3d model from 3d objects

Module Description

This field is covered by the following laboratory exercises:

1. Introduction to CAD environment.

2. Description of CAD software, explanation of concepts related to CAD design.

3. Introduction to a specific software’s environment.

4. Basic commands: program interface, coordinate system, line design.

Designing in two dimensions

5. Drawing tools and depiction control on the screen, simple objects drawing such as line segments, circles, arcs, points, polylines, manufacturing lines and general design "entities" related to object.

6. Designing methods and project organization :

7. Methods to create “library” files that both minimize the time of drawing up of a project, and the quality of the final result.

8. Create layers and use them to design through CAD programs.

9. Drawing text, dimensions and design stripe: Format text, create design type and dimension design.

10. Printing: Set print parameters of a defined scale.

11. Creating uniform design entities, entities with properties, importing entities and individual files in the project, external references:

12. Creation of design entities

Creating and handling three-dimensional models

13. Introduction to three dimensions: Convert 2D floor plan in 3D, Isometric and axonometric view Create multiple views.

14. Axles System Manager.

15. Facades and sections creation: Creation of solids and surfaces. 

16. Modification procedure  into three dimensions: Removing and adding solids, rotate, move, and copy objects in the X,Y and Z axis

17. Photorealistic rendering three-dimensional models, creating views and sections: Introduction shadows, light source, hide behind lines realistic presentations.

The lab exercises follow a specific course method. In each course which processed by the students within laboratory under constant monitoring and guidance of the teaching staff. In every exercise students consolidate their previous knowledge’s and apply the newer. 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Language evaluation: Greek (English for “Erasmus” students)

The examination beyond the merit process develops students critical thinking that assessed to implementation of an unknown (to them) issue.

Laboratory Examination: 100% (90% if the student choose to create a project)

Student project (optional): 10%

Recommended or required Bibliography

Hellenic (Greek)

1. AutoCad 2009Omura GeorgeGiourdas M.

2. Work with AutoCad 2009Yiannis Th. KaposClidarithmos

2. Work with AutoCad 2012Yiannis Th. KaposClidarithmos

3. 3D AutoCad 2008 Kordonias VasiliosClidarithmos

4. Learning guide to AutoCad 2008 και 2007Kordonias Vasilios Clidarithmos

English

1. AutoCAD 2010 and AutoCAD LT 2010 Bible, Ellen Finkelstein, ISBN: 9788126526451

ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Lectures, face-to-face
Weekly Hours:  Lectures: 2
ECTS:  4
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

After the completion of the course, students will be able to:

1. Understand and illustrate concepts  related to natural and anthropogenic environment

2. Use in a meaningful way the previously mentioned knowledge in civil constructions, according to national legislation which complies with the legislation of the European Union and  the international one

3. Comprehend, discuss, explain, apply the environmental impact of a wide range of civil constructions

4. Classify different types of environmental indicators 

5. Define and describe different types of renewable energy sources

6. Incorporate the usage of the renewable energy sources in civil constructions

7. Identify and demonstrate different types of environmental impact associated with different case studies and categories of construction projects

8.  Obtain in-depth knowledge and critical understanding of the theory and principles of the environmental evaluation

9. Acquire knowledge about  funding and management techniques related to environmental protection and evaluation 

10. Recite, list and quote basic European and National Legislation connected to environmental evaluation

11. Recognize the significance of  the protected  areas (e.g. Natura, Ramsar etc)

12.  To know and apply the rules and recommendations related to environmental protection.

Module Description

i. water (liquid waste, marine environment, water quality, floods, etc)

ii. air (quality, pollution from different sources, protection of the ozon layer etc)

iii. soil (soil erosion form agricultural activities, form natural causes, from civil constructions, form industrial pollution etc)

iv. solid waste (types of solid waste, calculations. management of solid waste, recycling etc)

v. noise

vi. Protection regime (NATURA, Biodiversity, Ramsar areas etc) 

vii. Renewable Energy Sources 

viii. Genetically Modified Organisms

ix. Global warming and pertinent legislation (Kioto Protocol, CCS, etc)

x. Horizontal legislation (publicity of environmental information, Aarhous Conention etc)

xi. Civil environmental constructions

xii. Civil constructions for reducing water waste (water resources protection and rational management)

xiii. Renewable Energy Sources, Evaluation (Advantages-Disadvantages) 

xiv. Environmental policies, Assessment of Environmental Impact 

xv. Environmental impact studies (Definitions, scope, objectives, content, impact categories, methodology of environmental assessment, environmental indicators) 

xvi. European and national environmental legislation

xvii. Planning and Organizing the environmental information (categories of projects/civil constructions and pertinent activities)

xviii. Valuable Information for students: presentation of the “green” occupations with popular need in Europe

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination in Greek: 70%

written work/essay/report during the semester (in Greek): 30%

Recommended or required Bibliography

1. Anjaneyulu Y.,Manickam V.(2007)“Environmental Impact Assessment Methodologies.”Second Edition, BS Publications (in Greek).

2. Bernstein L., Bosch P. et.al.(2007)«Climate Change 2007: Synthesis Report: An Assessment of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change” IPCC Plenary XXVII (Valencia, Spain, 12-17 November 2007), formally agreed statement of the IPCC, Working Group contributions to the Fourth Assessment Report.(in Greek).

3. Ε.Τ.Ε., (2004), Technology of Environmental Protection , European Technological Editions-E.T.E. (in Greek).

4. Gizari A. (2003), New mechanisms of the environmental policy in the E.U. Sakoulas Publications, Athens (in Greek)

5. Kerry Em.,(2008),  Climate Change, Politropon Editions (in Greek).

6. Lerche Ι., Glaesser W. (2006) «Environmental Risk Assessment. Quantitative Measures, Anthropogenic Influences, Human Impact», Springer, Berlin

7. Michalopoulou H. (2004), Laws for the Environment, Ziti Publications, Athens (in Greek)

8. Miller G. T., (1999), Problems of Environmental Systems, Ion Publications Athens (in Greek)

9. Panagopoulos Th. (2004) “Environmental Legislation” 4th Edition, Stamoulis Publications, Athens (in Greek)

10. Theofili Eleni : “Notes on environmental legislation” Explanatory notes on pertinent environmental legislation that include all the alterations on the established legal framework (in Greek)

CONSTRUCTION DETAILS II

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Lectures, laboratories
Weekly Hours:  Lectures: 2, Laboratory: 5
ECTS:  6
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, students will have:

1. In-depth knowledge and critical understanding of the technological methods to be applied, 

2. Knowledge and skills in understanding the constructional techniques, as well as applying them in different projects, 

3. Abilities acquired and synthesis skills in regards to the engineering part, as well as the design procedure of each construction, 

4. Ability to programming and supervision of the working phases that each project undergoes, especially as far as different materials may be used.

Specifically, students will be able to:

1. To choose the particular construction techniques and to be able to focus on the specifications as given by the engineering industry.

2. To develop their personal criteria in regards to choosing the specialized materials and their applications in constructions. 

3. To proceed in suggesting quality improvement techniques.

4. To know and apply the rules and recommendations related to environmental protection, as related to new constructions.

Module Description

1. Introduction to the use of new materials and new technologies

2. Control and optimization of construction and maintenance works

3. Guidelines in regards to design principles.

4. Method of design production 

5. Spatial design parameters in regards to internal architecture

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination: 60%

Laboratory exercise:  40%

Recommended or required Bibliography

1. Αθανασόπουλος Χρήστος Γ., Κατασκευή Κτιρίων, Σύνθεση και Τεχνολογία, ιδιωτική έκδοση, Αθήνα 1997.

2. Καλογεράς Ν. – Κιρπότιν Χ. – Μακρής Γ. – Παπαϊωάννου Ι. – Ραυτόπουλος Σ. – Τζιτζάς Μ. – Τουλιάτος Π., Θέματα Οικοδομικής, εκδόσεις Συμμετρία, Αθήνα 1999.

3. Schmitt Heinrich, Heene Andreas, Κτιριακές κατασκευές, εκδόσεις Γκιούρδας, Αθήνα, 1994.

STATICS I

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Lectures and exercises, face-to-face 
Weekly Hours:  Lectures: 4, Exercises: 3
ECTS:  8
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:

1. Have acquired in-depth knowledge and critical understanding of the theory and principles of Statics, in order, with use of new technologies and information systems, can design Statically determinate structures with various geometry.

2. Perceive, analyze and solve Statically determinate structures (Beams, Frames, Trusses) with or without truss.

3. To analyze and evaluate and draw diagrams of internal forces (N, Q, M) in Statically determinate structures subject to moving loadings.

Module Description

Theory

The core modules of the course include:

1. Principles of Statics. Free Body Diagram (F.B.D.).

2. Solution and drawing of Internal forces Diagrams (Ν), (Q) and (Μ) for simple statically determinate structures

3. Modelling and solution of rigid three-pinned arch.

4. Modelling and solution of trussed or composed three-pinned arch.

5. Modelling and solution of Gerber – beam and drawing of internal forces diagram.

6. Modelling and solution of Gerber – frame and drawing of internal forces diagram.

7. Modelling and solution of indirect loaded structures.

8. Modelling and solution of strengthened beams with system of pinned bars.

9. Modelling and solution of strengthened frames with system of pinned bars.

10. Modelling and solution of hanged structures and bridges.  

11. Definition of Influence Lines for a mobile Unit loading.

12. Drawing of Influence Lines for a cantilever beam, a simply supported beam and a frame with evaluation of minimum or maximum value of internal forces (Ν,Q,M).

13. Drawing of Influence Lines for a truss beam with evaluation of minimum or maximum value of reaction forces and axial forces.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Theory:

Final written examination: 80%, which includes:

-Solution of statically determinate structures

Exercises examination: 20%, which includes:

-Solution of statically determinate structures

Recommended or required Bibliography

1. Valiasis Th. (1997), Statics of Linearly Elastic Frames, Thessaloniki: Ziti Publications (in Greek).

2. Nitsiotas G. (1995), Statics of Linearly Elastic Frames (Classic Statics), Thessaloniki: Ziti Publications (in Greek).

3. Teaching Notes and Exercises by C. Demakos (n Greek).

ARCHITECTURE

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  
Weekly Hours:  
ECTS:  
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

 

Module Description

 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

 

Recommended or required Bibliography

 

5th Semester

SOIL MECHANICS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  LECTURES, LABORATORIES , FACE TO FACE
Weekly Hours:  Lectures: 3, Laboratory: 2
ECTS:  5
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

THE COURSE IS AN INTRODUCTION TO BASIC CONCEPTS OF SOIL MECHANICS, METHODS OF GEOTECHNICAL INVESTIGATION AND TO PHYSICAL, DYNAMIC AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SOIL. SIMULTANEOUSLY, IT DEEPENS IN SPECIALIZED KNOWLEDGE AND CONCEPTS REQUIRING CAPACITY AND SKILLS DEVELOPMENT BOTH IN UNDERSTANDING AND IN USE OF NEW TECHNOLOGY. SPECIFICALLY, IT DEALS WITH MECHANIC OF SOIL AND THE UNDERSTANDING OF ITS BEHAVIOUR.

OBJECTIVE OF COURSE IS THE UNDERSTANDING OF SOIL CONDITIONS AND CHARACTERISTICS OF SOIL WITH THE AIM OF THE BETER WAYS OF FOUNDATION DETERMINATION.

 

UPON COMPLETION OF LECTURE, STUDENTS WILL BE ABLE TO:

1. PERCEIVE THE COMPACTION AND THE SETTLEMENTS OF COHESIVE AND INCOHESIVE SOILS.

2. COMFORTLY MAKE USE OF THE CONDITION OF SOIL HYDRAULIC.

3. CALCULATE THE TOTAL NORMAL STRESS, PORE WATER PRESSURE, AND EFFECTIVE NORMAL STRESS.

4. DETERMINE THE DISTRIBUTION OF STRESSES IN SUBSOIL UNDER THE ENERGY OF EXTERNAL LOADS (METHOD BOUSSINESQ).

5. DESCRIBE THE MECHANICAL BEHAVIOR AND THE MOHR – COULOMB FAILURE CRITERION.

6. IDENTIFY LATERAL EARTH PRESSURE BY RANKINE AND COULOMB AND THE BEARING CAPACITY OF SHALLOW FOUNDATIONS BY TERZAGHI.

 

AFTER THE END OF LAB TESTS, THE STUDENTS WILL BE ABLE TO PERCEIVE, INTERPRET AND CLEARLY EXPLAIN ISSUES RELATED TO: 

PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF SOIL, WATER CONTENT, SPECIFIC WEIGHT, ATTERBERG LIMITS, PARTICLE SIZE ANALYSIS, COMPACTION (PROCTOR TEST), PERMEABILITY, CONSOLIDATION, UNIAXIAL COMPRESSIVE STRENGTH, DIRECT SHEAR TEST, TRIAXIAL TEST.

GENERALLY, THE COURSE OF SOIL MECHANICS HELPS TO THE INVESTIGATION OF ACTUAL PROBLEMS AND GIVES SOLUTIONS.

WITH REGARD TO THE SKILLS, STUDENTS, AFTER THE END OF THE COURSE, BE ABLE TO:

1. ENGAGE CRITICAL ANALYSES RELATIVE WITH THE OBJECT OF THE COURSE

2. ANALYZE PROBLEMS TAKING INTO CONSIDERATION THE LACK OR THE EXCESSIVE SUPPLY OF DATA 

3. RECEIVE AND EVALUATE DATA AND COMPOSE THEM FOR THE RESOLUTION OF PROBLEMS

4. THINK CREATIVELY AND WITH THE USE OF THEIR EXPERIENCE, RESOLVE PROBLEMS

5. INVESTIGATE SUITABLY THE BIBLIOGRAPHY, DRAW AND EXECUTE INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH OR IN TEAMS. 

6. HAVE A PROVEN CRITICAL ABILITY SO THEY CAN COMPARE AND EVALUATE DIFFERENT STATEMENTS ON THE BEHAVIOUR OF THE SOIL.

 

WITH REGARD TO THE FACULTIES, STUDENTS MIGHT:

1. ENGAGE STUDIES OF SOIL MECHANICS FOR CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS USING MODERN METHODS AND REGULATIONS

2. EXPRESS OPINIONS WITH REGARD TO THE SOIL MECHANIC PROBLEMS OF EXISTING CONSTRUCTIONS.

Module Description

THEORY: 

THE CORE MODULES OF THE COURSE INCLUDE:

1. INTRODUCTION, 

2. METHODS OF GEOTECHNICAL INVESTIGATION, 

3. PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF SOIL. 

4. CLASSIFICATION, 

5. COMPACTION,

6. HYDRAULIC, 

7. SETTLEMENTS OF COHESIVE AND INCOHESIVE SOILS, 

8. DISTRIBUTION OF STRESSES IN SUBSOIL UNDER THE ENERGY OF EXTERNAL LOADS (METHOD BOUSSINESQ), 

9. MECHANICAL BEHAVIOR AND THE MOHR – COULOMB FAILURE CRITERION, 

10. LATERAL EARTH PRESSURE BY RANKINE AND COULOMB, 

11. BEARING CAPACITY OF SHALLOW FOUNDATIONS BY TERZAGHI.

LAB: 

THE WORKSHOP INCLUDES THE FOLLOWING LABORATORY EXERCISES:

1. PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF SOIL, 

2. WATER CONTENT, 

3. SPECIFIC WEIGHT, 

4. ATTERBERG LIMITS, 

5. PARTICLE SIZE ANALYSIS, 

6. COMPACTION (PROCTOR TEST), 

7. PERMEABILITY, 

8. CONSOLIDATION, 

9. UNIAXIAL COMPRESSIVE STRENGTH, 

10. DIRECT SHEAR TEST, 

11. TRIAXIAL TEST.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

LANGUAGE OF EVALUATION: GREEK

THEORY 60%:

1. FINAL WRITTEN EXAMINATION (80%) INCLUDES:

• QUESTIONS ON THEORETICAL PART

• JUDGEMENT QUESTIONS AND

• EXERCISES ABOUT CASE STUDIES.

2. PROJECTS (20%). 

LABORATORY 40%:

1. FINAL WRITTEN EXAMINATION (80%) INCLUDES:

• JUDGEMENT QUESTIONS 

• MULTIPLE CHOICE QUESTIONS AND

• EXERCISES ABOUT CASE STUDIES

2. WRITING LABORATORY REPORTS (20%). DESCRIPTION OF LABORATORY EXERCISE AND THE WAY OF IMPLEMENTATION, PRESENTATION OF MEASUREMENTS, PRESENTATION OF RESULTS (CALCULATIONS, DIAGRAMS, ETC.), COMMENTS ON RESULTS, CONCLUSIONS AND COMPARISON WITH INTERNATIONAL REFERENCES.

Recommended or required Bibliography

1. G.E. BARNES (2005), SOIL MECHANICS: PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE, SECOND EDITION, KLIDARITHMOS, ATHENS.

2. Μ. KAVADAS (2009), SOIL MECHANICS DATA, ARIS SIMEON, ATHENS (IN GREEK).

3. R.F. CRAIG (2002), SOIL MECHANICS, SPON PRESS, U.K.

4. D. VALALAS (2001), SOIL MECHANICS, KIRIAKIDES, THESSALONIKI (IN GREEK),

5. JOHN ATKINSON (2006), THE MECHANICS OF SOILS AND FOUNDATIONS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, U.K.

STATICS II

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Lectures
Weekly Hours:  Lectures: 4, Laboratory: 2
ECTS:  7
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, students will have:

1. Detailed knowledge and critical understanding of the theory and principles of static behavior indeterminate structures.

2. Knowledge and skills in solving indeterminate structures.

3. Knowledge and skills evaluation results obtained with the help of structural analysis software.

Specifically, students will be able to:

1. Describe and recognize indeterminate structures.

2. Explain the operation and response of statically indeterminate structures.

3. Develop methodologies solving frame structures.

4. Implement quantitative and qualitative design techniques of internal forces diagrams.

5. Know and apply the definition and evaluation of influence lines of statically indeterminate structures.

Module Description

• Advantages and disadvantages of indeterminate structures. 

• Methodologies for determining the degree of kinematic & statically indeterminacy of structures.

• The Force Method for beams and frames.

• The Three-Moment Equation for continuous beam (Clapeyron's Theorem). 

• Fixed-end moments for fixed-fixed and fixed-simply supported beams. 

• The basic Displacement Method for beams and frames. 

• The Moment Distribution Method (the Cross Method) for continuous beams and for frames with non-translated and translated nodes.

• Symmetric structures under symmetric and anti-symmetric loading. 

• Qualitative influence lines for statically indeterminate beams and frames applying the Müller-Breslau principle

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination: 85%

Laboratory exercise: 15%

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.  Stavridis L. (2006), Statics of Structures, Part Α, Athens: Publisher KLEIDARITHMOS (in greek).

2.  R.C. Hibbeler (2006), Structural Analysis, 6th edition, (in English)

REINFORCED CONCRETE I

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Face-to-face lectures 
Weekly Hours:  Lectures and Exercises: 5
ECTS:  7
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The aim of the course is the comprehension of the behaviour of concrete and its use in structures, the knowledge of its properties and the design of reinforced concrete members.

Upon completion of the course, students will have:

1. Knowledge of the properties of reinforced concrete.

2. In-depth knowledge and critical understanding of theory and principles of structural design and calculation of reinforced concrete structures.

3. Knowledge and skills in modelling, design and calculation of reinforced concrete members.

4. Ability to put what they learn in practical use.

5. Ability to develop personal responsibility and offer scientific opinion.

6. Ability to manage time in an appropriate manner.

Specifically, students will be able to:

1. Understand subjects relevant to the of reinforced concrete structures

2. Design new reinforced concrete members

3. Calculate the structural capacity of reinforced concrete members

Module Description

Introduction. Concrete. Stress-strain diagram of material. Reinforcement steel. Bond between concrete and reinforcement bars. Anchorage of steel bars. Reinforced concrete. Design limit states. Ultimate and Serviceability limit states. Design against axial actions: Assumptions, Properties of materials. Rectangular sections. Axial tension. Prevalent Bending, diagrams and CEB design tables. Prevalent Compression. Slabs. One-way slabs, Two-way slabs. Cantilever Slabs. Flat slabs. Stairs. Modelling of RC structures. Construction detailing, minimum covers, distance of bars, allowed curvatures. Minimum requirements per structural element (sectional dimensions, minimum reinforcement). Course assignment: (i) software development for the calculation of the yield and capacity bending moment of a rectangular concrete section. (ii) Slab design of a concrete structure.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Language of evaluation: Greek

Final written examination: 80%

Preparation for project: 20%

Recommended or required Bibliography

1. Chouliaras Ioannis (2003). Reinforced Concrete Constructions: According to Greek Reinforced Concrete Rule 2000, Papasotiriou Publications, Athens (in Greek).

2. Gros G. (2004), Reinforced Concrete according to Greek Reinforced Concrete Rule 2000. Comparison with Eurocode 2 and DIN 1045/2001. Materials – Design – Structures, Athens: Symmetria Publications (in Greek).

3. Georgopoulos Th., (2004), Reinforced Concrete (vol. Α), Pavlos Georgopoulos Publications (in Greek).

4. Georgopoulos Th., (2004), Reinforced Concrete (vol. B), Pavlos Georgopoulos Publications (in Greek).

5. Economou Ch.M., (2009), Reinforced Concrete from A to Z, SELKA-4M Publications.

6. Zararis Pr., (2002), Reinforced Concrete, Thessaloniki: Kyriakidis Br. Publications (in Greek).

7. Konstantinidis A., (1994), Reinforced Concrete Applications – Vol A, Athens: Π Systems International Publications (in Greek). 

8. Konstantinidis A., (1994), Reinforced Concrete Applications – Vol B, Athens: Π Systems International Publications (in Greek). 

9. Bhatt, P., MacGinley, T. J., & Choo, B. S. (2006). “Reinforced Concrete, Design Theory and Examples“. 3rd Edition. Taylor & Francis

10. Brooker, O. et. al. (2006). “How to Design Concrete Structures using Eurocode 2″. The Concrete Centre.

11. Goodchild, C. H. (2009). “Worked Examples to Eurocode 2″. Volume 1. The Concrete Centre.

12. Mosley, B., Bungey, J. & Hulse R. (2007). “Reinforced Concrete Design to Eurocode 2″. 6thEdition. Palgrave McMillan

13. Narayanan, R. S., & Goodchild, C. H. (2006). “Concise Eurocode 2″. The Concrete Centre.

14. Park and Paulay, (1975), “Reinforced Concrete,” John Wiley & Sons.

BUILDING CONSTRUCTION DETAILS III

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  
Weekly Hours:  
ECTS:  
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

 

Module Description

 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

 

Recommended or required Bibliography

 

COSTING CONSTRUCTION

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Face-to-face 
Weekly Hours:  Lectures: 2
ECTS:  3
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The course aims to examine issues that aimed at using accounting information for making projects costing decisions. In particular,  the course examines the issues of training, monitoring and control of operational budgets, analysis of deviations that  resulting from them, the qualifying investment projects, cost analysis - volume - profit and the decisions affecting those relations. At the same time,  they present basic concepts and costing systems that concerns mainly costing works.

(A) Cost of Public Works Process: Planning, Preliminary Design, Final Design , Application design , Tendering , budgeting Table , unit price analysis , Analysis articles A.T.O.E. , General contract terms A.T.O.E.

(B) Cost Private Projects Process: Budgeting private project and supervisions Buildings works and facilities for the issuance of building permits. Calculation minimum wage pension topographical surveys compiled with specifications for issuance of building permits. Revisions permission for change of use,  demolition , charges for the issue of building a new building permit, calculation of flat technicians required minimum wage .

Upon completion of the course the students will be able to:

• Understand the basic concepts of cost and current trends in this field worldwide.

• To utilize techniques , tools and costing methods in practice.

• Know what methods , tools and techniques are suitable for the extraction and processing of information, depending on the decision to be taken .

Module Description

1) The Meaning and Importance of Management Accounting . Differences Between Finance and Management Accounting.

2) Concepts and Distinctions - cost categories

3) Behavior - Analysis and the Use of the Cost

4) Project Costing –Orders

5) Costing Process or Continuous Production

6) Cost -Based Operating Segments and Business Activities. The allocation process

7) Relationship between Cost and Volume Manufacturing . The Βreak Even Point.

8) Stock - Inventory Management Methods

9) The Standard Cost and Control of Imbalances . Table Balanced Target

10) Τhe Budget and Analysis the Forms

11) Training Petitions during Departments / Projects

12) Business decisions in Construction Engineering and Utility Costs 

13) Pricing and Tariff Policy of Projects

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination: 80%

written work, essay/report: 20%

Recommended or required Bibliography

1. «Cost and Construction Budget»

  Moutsopoulou – Τsipra (2008),  Edition Tziola (in Greek)

2. «Cost Accounting»

Venieris G. (2005) edition PUBLISHING (in Greek) 

OPERATIONAL RESEARCH

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  In-Class
Weekly Hours:  Lectures, Workshops and Laboratory Exercises: 2
ECTS:  3
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The Operations Research is an essential tool of management for solving executive and operational decision problems throughout the functionality of enterprises and organizations as well as in dealing with engineering projects. The course provides the fundamental knowledge and main areas of Operational Research and the description of methods and applications in modeling problems of optimal allocation of scarce resources.

After completing the course, students will be able to:

• Describe accurately real world decision problems and identify the steps to solve the problem (problem formulation, modeling, methodological approaches and algorithms, exploitation of the results , implementation of the decision).

• Exploit effectively the results of the processing of the problems data.

• Identify previous cases which are relevant and can help to solve the problem.

• Analyze complex decision problems and construct mathematical models describing them, taking into account all the parameters and restrictions governing the decision problem .

• Select and apply the appropriate methodological approach for solving decision problems.

• Use appropriate mathematical software and develop applications to solve problems.

• Analyze the results  and propose a solution or solutions (decisions).

• Argue for the choice of the proposed decision.

Module Description

• Introduction to Operational Research

• Linear ProgrammingΓραμμικός προγραμματισμός,

o Description and Problem Formulation,

o Graphical Solution of Linear Programme for two variables

o SIMPLEX method

o Sensitivity Analysis

o Economical Interpretation of the results

o Use SIMPEX method for minimisation problems

o Case Studies, Exercises

• Integer Programming and Applications

• Network Optimisation

o The Transportation problem

o Optimisation of networks

o Maximisation of Network Flows

o The Shortest Path Root problem

• Solving problems using MS EXCEL

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Ι. Final Written Exam (70%) (Summative Evaluation) includes:

- Short answer questions

- Problems solutions with the taught methods

ΙΙ. Individual project (30%) (Summative Evaluation): 

Evaluation Criteria: 

• Completeness - 35%

• Clearness - 25%

• Documentation - 30%

• Critical Evaluation- 10%

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Recommended Book and Journal Article Resources:

• Μοσχονά Θ., Χαλικιάς Μ., Χελιδόνης Γ. (2010) Επιχειρησιακή Έρευνα Σύγχρονη Εκδοτική

• Υψηλάντης Π. (2010) Επιχειρησιακή Έρευνα, εκδ. Προπομπός

• Albright, S.C. and Winston, W.L. (2005). Spreadsheet Modeling and Applications: Essentials of Practical Management Science, Thomson Brooks/Cole .

• Anderson, D.R., Sweeney, D.J., Williams, T.A., Camm, J.D. and Martin, K. (2010). An Introduction to Management Science, Quantitative Approaches to Decision Making, 10th ed., Delmar Cengage Learning.

• Σισκος, Ι. (1999), Γραμμικός Προγραμματισμός, Εκδόσεις Νέων Τεχνολογιών.

-Journals:

• European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier

• Operational Research: An International Journal, Springer

• Annals of Operations Research, Springer

CONSTRUCTION HISTORY

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Lectures, face-to-face.
Weekly Hours:  Lectures: 2
ECTS:  2
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:

1. Recall the structural systems and their development in history.

2. Explain the terms STRUCTURE, FORM, STRUCTURAL FORM, STRUCTURAL SYSTEM.

3. Recognize the structural and architectural features in historic buildings, with emphasis on the buildings in Greek urban centres during 19th century and early 20th.

4. Perform the organization of a complete description after the investigation of case studies which belong to the previous category of historic buildings.

5. Analyze the construction and architectural features of exiting historic buildings and predict their structural system.

6. Interpret and compare the structural principles in history and their relation to the recent systems.

Module Description

1: The aims of Construction History; definition of the axes of the contents; the terms “structure” and “form”; general presentation of the structural systems.

2-3: The structural system “post-and-beam”; the Greek temple.

4-5: Arches, domes and vaults; development, evolution and dissemination; the Byzantine church; the Gothic cathedral.

6-7-8-9: The dissemination of the Classical Architecture principles until early 20th century; the use of the Classical Architecture parts in the buildings of Romantic Classicism in Greece; urban buildings in Modern Greece during 19th and early 20th century; terminology and construction details; Greek traditional architecture.

10: Wooden and iron structures.

11: Monolithic structures (underground structures; reinforced concrete structures). 

12: Comparative remarks. 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Evaluation in Greek language.

Evaluation procedure

-written examination (80%),

-small scale research project (20%).

The criteria are accessible to students through the opencourses.

Recommended or required Bibliography

Suggestive Bibliography in foreign languages

Becchi A. – Corradi F. – Foce F. – Pedemonte O. eds. (2004), Construction History. Research Perspectives in Europe, Kim Williams Books: Firenze. 

Becchi A. – Corradi F. – Foce F. – Pedemonte O. eds. (2003), Essays on the History of Mechanics, Birkhäuser: Basel.

Becchi A. – Corradi F. – Foce F. – Pedemonte O. eds. (2002), Towards a History of Construction, dedicated to Edoardo Benvenuto, series Between Mechanics and Architecture, Birkhäuser: Basel.

Frampton K. (1992), Modern Architecture – A critical history, 3rd edition, Thames and Hudson: London.

Furneau – Jordan Robert (1969), A Concise History of Western Architecture, London: Thames and Hudson.

Proceedings of the Construction History International Congresses. 

Radelet de Grave P. – Benvenuto E. eds. (1995), Entre Méchanique et Architecture - Between Mechanics and Architecture, Birkhäuser: Basel.

Salvadori Mario – Heller Robert (1975), Structure in Architecture, 2nd edition, Prentice Hall. 

Wells M. (2008), A History of Engineering and Structural Design, London: Taylor and Francis Ltd.

CONSTRUCTION MACHINERY

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Lectures, exercices, distance learning methods 
Weekly Hours:  Lectures: 2
ECTS:  3
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Basic and essential knowledge:

to understand the needs of a project for correct choice of earthmoving machines on a project,

for costing study and time definition of excavation, paving, embankment and machinery depreciation during their useful life

to develop atomic engineering responsibility and scientific opinion

Module Description

Classification of Construction Machinery – Factors that influence the choice of the construction machineries – Excavation Activities – Performance and Productivity of Machineries – Maintenance and Repairs of the Machinery – Function Costs of the Machineries - Depreciation methods Machinery - Financial Lifetime Machinery - Excavation machinery - Scrapers - Graders - Ground Modulators - Promoters - Loaders - Transportation Equipment - Transportation Vehicles - Machinery Soil Compaction - Engineering Establishment Quarry Production of Aggregates - Soil stabilization - Formation Worksite Concrete Production - Machinery transfer Concrete - Concrete Pumps - Concrete Asphalt Equipment - Snow and Ice Management - Security Measures machine functions. Vibrators mass surface. Structural Cranes, Hoists

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination: 60%

Laboratory exercise: 40%

Optional job preparation and presentation of up to 24%, less than the proportion of written examination

Recommended or required Bibliography

1) Ioannis D.Kofitsas , (1993), Elements of Construction Machinery, Athens: ION

2) Panagiotis Drakatou-Professor University of Athens, Construction Machinery

3) Sellountos, Vaios I., (2007), Technical Projects Machineries, Athens, Selka-4M  

6th Semester

DESIGN OF STEEL STRUCTURES

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Lectures 
Weekly Hours:  Lectures: 2, Design applications: 3
ECTS:  7
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, students will be able to :

1. Deeply understand the design of steel structures.

2. Study and suggest solutions in problems of steel design.

3. Develop personal responsibility and offer scientific opinion.

4. Manage time in an appropriate manner.

5. Develop analytical and synthetic abilities as well as critical evaluation.

6. Present ideas verbally or in written.

Specifically, students will be able to:

Design steel structures according to current standards but also to any new ones

Module Description

Design of steel structures by the use of the relevant codes considering ultimate limit state design, and serviceability design. Capacity design of sections in steel structures under tension, compression, buckling shear and in combination of them. Design of :threaded connections of links gibs of friction connections and of welded connection. Design under uniform and variable torsion. 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination: 80%

Design applications (assignments): 20%

Recommended or required Bibliography

1. ΣΧΕΔΙΑΣΜΟΣ ΔΟΜΙΚΩΝ ΕΡΓΩΝ ΑΠΟ ΧΑΛΥΒΑ ΜΕ ΠΑΡΑΔΕΙΓΜΑΤΑ ΕΦΑΡΜΟΓΗΣ, ΙΩΑΝΝΗΣ Κ. ΒΑΓΙΑΣ, ΙΩΑΝΝΗΣ Χ. ΕΡΜΟΠΟΥΛΟΣ, ΓΕΩΡΓΙΟΣ Ι. ΙΩΑΝΝΙΔΗΣ  

2. ΚΑΤΑΣΚΕΥΕΣ ΑΠΟ ΧΑΛΥΒΑ ΠΑΡΑΔΕΙΓΜΑΤΑ ΣΧΕΔΙΑΣΜΟΥ ΣΤΑ ΠΛΑΙΣΙΟ ΤΟΥ ΕΥΡΥΚΩΔΙΚΑ, Χ.Κ.ΜΠΑΝΙΩΤΟΠΟΥΛΟΣ, Θ.Ν. ΝΙΚΟΛΑΙΔΗΣ  

ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEER PROJECTS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Lectures, exersices , distance learning methods 
Weekly Hours:  Lectures: 3
ECTS:  3
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

A) Theoretical part Description:

Project selection (Configuration of ideas- Objectives and procedures; Project description-required eisroes- Time programmatismos- Costing actions and effect; Organization of the project; Restrictions on application)

Organization and implementation procedures (Integrated organizational structure; Factors of influence Management, liaison with other organizational units of Organogramma- Consulting drives execution units and operations; foreign assistance; Phases ektelesis- Control procedures; anadrasi- Evaluation and Future Planning

Monitoring Methods (File Organization - Programs ypologiston- Statistics analyseis- Methods provlepseon- shows progress; Collective and individual responsibility

Completion of the project (Economics course sizes; sizes; exclusion from the planned sizes; -Diapistoseis cost-benefit relationship for the future planning - maintenance- Veltioseis- Connecting to a project)

B) Laboratory Part Description:

Applications of  the theory.

Module Description

Choice of a Project: Configuration of the idea - Objectives and procedures - Project description - required input – Scheduling - Costing and output - Project organization -Restrictions on application. Organization and application procedures: Integrated organizational structure-Factors of Influence - Management Liaison with other organizational units – Chart - Consulting units and units for performing the operations - Outdoor subscription - Execution phases - Control procedures - Evaluation and feedback - Future planning. Monitoring Methods: Organizing files - Programs computers - Statistical analyses –Prediction Methods – Progress Review - Collective and individual responsibility. Completion of the Project: Physical quantities - Financial Indicators - Deviations from the planned sizes - Cost-benefit relation - Outcomes for future planning – Maintenance - Tuning – Connection with projects.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination: 60%

Laboratory exercise: 40%

Optional job preparation and presentation of up to 24%, less than the proportion of written examination

Recommended or required Bibliography

1. CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT OF THECNICAL PROJECTS: ANTONIOS KASTRINAKIS

2. CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT, ORGANISATION OF CONSTRUCTION SITE, PANAGIOTIS GEORGAKOPOULOS

STATICS III

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Lectures, face-to-face.
Weekly Hours:  Lectures: 5
ECTS:  7
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:

1. Understand the in-general principles of the theory and application of new methodologies in the static and dynamic analysis of structures.

2. They have acquired the knowledge and skills in modeling and simulation of structures using computer packages.

3. Be able to apply linear static and dynamic analysis in 2d and 3d structures

Module Description

1) Mathematical Preliminaries

2) Introduction to the Direct Stiffness Method and its application in the analysis of framed structures. 

3) Transformation matrices. Vectors of nodal forces and nodal displacements of an element. Degrees of freedom.

4) Stiffness matrices of plane truss and plane frame elements. Formulation of nodal load, nodal displacement and global stiffness matrices of the structure. Structure support. 

5) Calculation of structure’s nodal displacements and elements’ nodal forces.

6) Introduction to the dynamic analysis. Differences between static and dynamic analysis.

7) Dynamic loads. Free and forced vibrations of single-degree-of-freedom systems. Eigenfrequency and eigenperiod.

8) Damping. Simulation and analysis of a single and two degrees of freedom systems. 

9) Equation of motions. Free and forced vibrations of multi-degree-of-freedom systems.

10) The finite element method for the dynamic analysis of shear framed structures. 

11) Modal analysis.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Language of evaluation: Greek

Written examination: 100%

Optional Course Project: 20% (in this case the written examination is 80%)

Recommended or required Bibliography

1) Dynamic Analysis of Structures (2012), J.T. Katsikadelis, Symmetria Publications, Athens (in Greek).

2) Dynamics of Structures (2008), A. Chopra, Prentice-Hall, NJ. 

FOREIGN (ENGLISH) TECHNICAL TERMINOLOGY

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Lectures in class, face-to-face, English Language Computer Laboratory with related software
Weekly Hours:  Lectures: 2
ECTS:  3
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course students will be able to:

• Understand scientific texts relative to the field of Civil  Engineering, either globally (global understanding) or thoroughly (scanning-thorough comprehension)

• Acquire the terminology and syntax of scientific texts through various methods and techniques

• Analyze the structure and organization elements of scientific speech on multiple levels (sentence, paragraph, text)

• Produce oral speech and construct written speech of multiple forms (instructions, description of components, functions and processes, essay writing, reports, professional mail etc.)

Specifically, students will be able to:

• Acquire and use technical vocabulary, terminology and structure connected to the field of Civil  Engineering 

• Extract specific information from texts about components, devices, structures, and processes

• Identify devices, components, structures, processes and explain their function

• Understand the structure and function of devices and components

• Recognize differences between types of devices and components

• Understand the relation between structures, components and processes

• Understand the features and technical specifications of different components and devices

• Describe devices, components, structures, and processes

•  Discriminate between different types of processes

Module Description

• THE REQUIREMENTS OF A BUILDING( materials and technical ability, performance requirements)

• DURABILITY (changes in appearance, physical deterioration, intended life span).

• SITE CONSIDERATIONS – INITIAL SITE WORKS

• EXCAVATION – FOUNDATION ( function, design, foundation construction)

• CONSTRUCTION METHODS I (materials, construction)

• CONSTRUCTION METHODS II ( materials, block/ cavity walls)

• STRENGHT AND STABILITY (dead, live, wind loads, structural organization)

• STRUCTURES ( continuous structures, framed structures)

• STEEL CONSTRUCTION ( wall-bearing construction, skeleton-framing, long-span construction)

• REINFORCED CONCRETE

• COST PLANNING

• ENVIROMENTAL PROTECTION

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination: 100%

Optional project preparation and presentation: up to 20%, added to total score

Recommended or required Bibliography

1. TECHNICAL ENGLISH FOR CIVIL ENGINEERS, SURVEYORS AND ARCHITECTS (Mary Vatidou, Georgia Lambrakou-Vitis  synchroni ekdotiki) 

2. TEACHING NOTES

3. INTERNETSOURCES     

4. AUTHENTIC READING TEXTS                                                                                  

POLITICAL ECONOMY

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Face-to-face
Weekly Hours:  Lectures: 2
ECTS:  3
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The course has the following goals :

1. To teach the economic way of thinking.

2. To provide a basic understanding of the major issues of the object .

3. To present the context of each object , the way, in which the theory associated with the business world , as also shown, the problems that arise when we look at the business world based on economic theory .

4. To summarize the main points of each object . 

5. To present some reference sources for further reading , which will enable students to their material for their future studies depending on the level of each financial course , beyond the introductory stage .

6. To put various species practice questions and provide answers , using technical - economic methods.

Further , students will be able to:

1. Understand and apply the basis for the study of Finance and distinguish between Microeconomics and Macroeconomics .

2. Be familiar with some basic tools of economic analysis and interpretation.

3.To apply the principles of Economic Thought .

4. Implement Diagrams, which are a powerful tool for teaching and learning of Finance (Original curves , movements of curves , arrows indicate the movement diagrams accompanied by tables , etc . )

5. To understand and quantify the fiscal and monetary policy.

Module Description

1. Introduction to the study of Economics.

2. Theory of Consumer .

3. The Market  (Demand theory , Theory of Supply ) .

4. The Elasticity (Demand Elasticity of Price, in terms of Income , Cross- Elasticity of Demand to the Price) .

5. The production ( productive factors , production costs , costs ) .

6. Theory of enterprises (Meaning Competition , Investigation of Public Interest , Forms of Market , etc.) 

7. Macroeconomics,  Circular flow of Income , Inflows and Outflows , Foreign Trade Results, examples.

8. Total Demand , (Consumption Function , Saving, etc. )

9. Total Demand and Supply .

10.Money and Banks .

11. Unemployment .

12.Inflation .

13.International Commerce 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Multiple choice questionnaire: 80%

Case studies-Problem solving, written work-questions: 20%

Recommended or required Bibliography

1. Ken Ferguson (2004), Basic Principles of Economic Theory, Athens, Kritiki edition. (In Greek)

2. Michael Parkin, Melanie Powell, Kent Matthews, Principles of Economical Theory) (2013), Αthens, Kritiki edition. 

3. Teaching notes, L. Athanasopoulou.

INSULATION - FIRE PROTECTION OF BUILDINGS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  
Weekly Hours:  
ECTS:  
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

 

Module Description

 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

 

Recommended or required Bibliography

 

BIOCLIMATIC CONSTRUCTION OF BUILDINGS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  
Weekly Hours:  
ECTS:  
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

 

Module Description

 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

 

Recommended or required Bibliography

 

REINFORCED CONCRETE II

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Face-to-face lectures, laboratories
Weekly Hours:  Lectures and classwork: 4, Laboratory Exercises: 3
ECTS:  7
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The aim of the course is the comprehension of the behavior of concrete and its use in structures, the ability to evaluate its properties through experimental procedures and the design of members and structures.

Upon completion of the course, students will have:

1. Knowledge of the behavior of reinforced concrete structures.

2. In-depth knowledge and critical understanding of theory and principles of structural design and calculation of reinforced concrete structures, since they could use new technologies and information systems in analysis and design of reinforced concrete structures.

3. Knowledge and skills in calculation of reinforced concrete structures.

4. Knowledge to put what they learn to solve practical problems of civil engineering

5. Ability to apply experimental procedures during design and construction process of a structure. 

6. Ability to experimentally evaluate the mechanical properties of concrete, rate its quality and evaluate its strength using destructive and non-destructive techniques.

7. Knowledge and skills in evaluating key parameters as the ductility and strength of reinforced concrete members.

8. Skills to determine the need of structural repair and strengthening and knowledge of retrofitting techniques using resins and FRPs. 

9. Background knowledge to apply what they learn in courses Repair and Strengthening and Prestressed Concrete.

10. Ability to develop personal responsibility and offer scientific opinion.

11. Ability to manage time in an appropriate manner.

Module Description

Theory

Beams, Columns, Strength of members with Bending and Axial loading. P-M diagrams. Biaxial bending. T-beams. Strength and deformation of members with Shear. Concrete confinement. Aspects of the seismic design of reinforced concrete structural elements (beams, columns, beam-column joints, structural walls). Buckling of reinforced concrete columns. Bond and anchorage: basic features of bond resistance, anchorage or development bond, types of anchorage. Design of concrete members under seismic loads.

Lab

Physical properties of Aggregates, Los Angeles testing, Properties and Workability of Cement, Elastic properties of Concrete, σ-ε diagram. Destructive and non-destructive methods for evaluation of concrete Strength. Flexural Behavior of Fiber Reinforced Beams. Theoretical Evaluation of Flexural Stiffness, Experimental determination of ultimate capacity and ductility ratio of Reinforced Concrete Beams.  Repair and Strengthening techniques for Rehabilitation of Lightly Reinforced Concrete Beams with FRPs and Cement mortars.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Language of evaluation: Greek

Theory:

Final written examination: 48%

Preparation for Project: 12%

Laboratory:

Final written examination: 40%

Recommended or required Bibliography

1. Chouliaras Ioannis (2003). Reinforced Concrete Constructions: According to Greek Reinforced Concrete Rule 2000, Papasotiriou Publications, Athens (in Greek).

2. Gros G. (2004), Reinforced Concrete according to Greek Reinforced Concrete Rule 2000. Comparison with Eurocode 2 and DIN 1045/2001. Materials – Design – Structures, Athens: Symmetria Publications (in Greek).

3. Georgopoulos Th., (2004), Reinforced Concrete (vol. Α), Pavlos Georgopoulos Publications (in Greek).

4. Georgopoulos Th., (2004), Reinforced Concrete (vol. B), Pavlos Georgopoulos Publications (in Greek).

5. Konstantinidis A., (1994), Reinforced Concrete Applications – Vol A, Athens: Π Systems International Publications (in Greek).

6. Konstantinidis A., (1994), Reinforced Concrete Applications – Vol B, Athens: Π Systems International Publications (in Greek).

7. Demakos C., Lecture Notes for Reinforced Concrete Laboratory.

8. Brooker, O. et. al. (2006). “How to Design Concrete Structures using Eurocode 2″. The Concrete Centre.

9. Goodchild, C. H. (2009). “Worked Examples to Eurocode 2″. Volume 1. The Concrete Centre.

10. Mosley, B., Bungey, J. & Hulse R. (2007). “Reinforced Concrete Design to Eurocode 2″. 6thEdition. Palgrave McMillan.

11. Narayanan, R. S., & Goodchild, C. H. (2006). “Concise Eurocode 2″. The Concrete Centre.

7th Semester

URBAN PLANNING AND DESIGN

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  
Weekly Hours:  
ECTS:  
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

 

Module Description

 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

 

Recommended or required Bibliography

 

REINFROCED CONCRETE III

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Lectures and exercises, face-to-face
Weekly Hours:  Lectures: 2, Exercises: 2
ECTS:  5
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:

1. They have acquired in-depth knowledge and critical understanding of the theory and principles of design and solution of Pretension structures, since they could use new technologies and information systems in the design of Long-span structures with Prestressed concrete.

2. Be able to perceive, design and analyze Pre- or Post-tension long span structures (Beams, Columns, Frames).

3. To have the ability to analyze and evaluate the internal forces (N, Q, M) remaining after the Pretension force losses.

Module Description

Theory

The core modules of the course include:

1. Principles for design of Pre-stressed structures.

2. Constituent materials of Pre-stressed structures. Methods for Prestressing structures.

3. Structural element submitted to a central Pretension force. 

4. Structural element submitted to an eccentric Pretension force.  

5. Design of section in serviceability limit state.

6. Evaluation of minimum cross section for a prestressed beam for safe bearing loading. 

7. Evaluation of minimum Pretension force for a prestressed beam.  

8. Design of Tendons profile for a prestressed beam.   

9. Losses of Pretension force (long-term and short-term). 

10. Evaluation of beam deflections.  

11. Anchorage systems for tendons, check and reinforcement of anchorage regions in a beam.  

12. Design of a beam section in bending and evaluation of reinforcement.  

13. Design of a beam section in shear and evaluation of reinforcement.  

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Theory:

Final Written examination: 80%, which includes: 

-Descriptive Questions 

-Solution of Pre-stressed structure

Project (Exercises) exam: 20%

Recommended or required Bibliography

1. Chr. Oikonomou and Chr. Karayannis, (2008), Pre-stressed Concrete (in Greek).

2. Th. Tassios, P. Giannopoulos, Κ.Trezos and S. Tsoukantas, (2008), Pre-stressed Concrete (in Greek).

3. Ned H., Burns, Bruce W., Russell, Tung-Yen, Lin, (2005), Design Of Prestressed Concrete Structures, John Wiley and Sons Ltd.

4.  F. K. Kong and R. H. Evans, (1975), Reinforced And Prestressed Concrete, London: Nelson

5. Exercise and Lecture notes by C. Demakos (in Greek).

COMPOSITE STRUCTURES

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Face to face, Distance learning
Weekly Hours:  Lectures: 2, Laboratory: 2
ECTS:  5
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:

1. Deeply understand the theory and principles of Composite Structures consisting of reinforced concrete and structural steel.

2. Study and suggest solutions in problems of Composite Structures.

3. Develop personal responsibility and offer scientific opinion

4. Manage time in an appropriate manner.

5. Develop analytical and synthetic abilities as well as critical evaluation.

6. Present ideas verbally or in written.

7. Analyze problems taking into account the lack or surplus of data.

8. Critically evaluate data and use it for the solution of problems.

9. Think originally, creatively and solve problems based on their experience and the use of modern methods and Codes.

Specifically, the students will be able to:

1. Create load combinations in the Ultimate Limit State (ULS) and Serviceability Limit State (SLS) using influence lines.

2. Analyze and design composite beams, columns and slabs using elastic and plastic theory.

3. Analyze and design sections against shear, taking into account the interaction between shear and normal forces.

4. Analyze and design shear connectors.

Module Description

1. Introduction. 

2. Materials.

3. Principles of design using composite structures.

4. Loads and load combinations. Partial safety factors. Combination factors. Limit states. 

5. Influence lines. 

6. Methods of analysis and section classification. 

7. Composite beams – elastic analysis.

8. Composite beams – plastic analysis.

9. Shear resistance.

10. Interaction between shear and normal forces. 

11. Composite columns. Buckling. 

12. Shear connectors – elastic design, plastic design. 

13. Composite slabs.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination: 100%

Optional semester assignment, which accounts for 20% of the overall grade with the written examination covering the remaining 80%. Applicable only when the written examination is successful.

Recommended or required Bibliography

1) Vayas, I. Composite structures of steel and reinforced concrete. Kleidarithmos, 3rd edition, 2010 (in Greek).

2) European Composite Structures, BODE, 1998, Giourdas (in Greek).

DESIGN OF EARTHQUAKE RESISTANT STRUCTURES

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Face-to-face
Weekly Hours:  Lectures and classwork: 5
ECTS:  7
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The aim of the course is to give the students fundamental concepts of technical seismology, basic concepts of current seismic codes and skills for the evaluation of the seismic response of structures.

Upon completion of the course, students will have:

1. Basic knowledge of engineering seismology for the cause of earthquakes, recording of earthquakes, seismometry, seismic waves, accelerographs.

2. In-depth knowledge and critical understanding of the theory and principles of the dynamic response of the structures and the seismic design.

3. Knowledge and understanding of the response spectrum.

4. Knowledge and skills in the processing of accelerographs and the creation of response spectra using appropriate software.

5. Knowledge and skills in the calculation and evaluation of the dynamic response of single and multi-degree of freedom systems in seismic excitations.

Specifically, students will be able to:

1. Have adequate comprehension skills of the concepts of technical seismology. 

2. Evaluate the seismic response of single and multi-degree of freedom systems with elastic or inelastic behaviour. 

3. Evaluate the seismic response of systems with torsional response.

4. Deeply understand the seismic behaviour of a structure through the evaluation of important parameters of the inelastic response, as the ductility, behaviour factor and overstrength. 

5. To study and evaluate the capacity of a structure and suggest solutions for its improvement 

6. Develop personal responsibility and offer scientific opinion.

7. Manage time in an appropriate manner.

Module Description

1. Introduction. Fundamental concepts of engineering seismology. Cause of earthquakes, Recording of earthquakes, Seismometry, Seismic waves, Accelerographs. 

2. Elastic seismic response of single-degree-of-freedom systems. 

3. Equation of motion, Free vibrations with or without damping, Earthquake response. 

4. Response spectrum. Alternative ways of displaying spectra, Effects of foundation conditions on the seismic response. 

5. Inelastic response of single-degree-of-freedom systems. Ductility, Behaviour factor, Overstrength – Relations q-μ. 

6. Inelastic response spectrum. Design spectrum. Seismic design (force method). 

7. Effect of torsion on the seismic response. Torsional response of elastic SDOF systems. 

8. Seismic response of multi degree–of–freedom systems. Modal spectrum analysis. 

9. Simplified lateral force method of analysis. 

10. Basic concepts of current Seismic Codes. Seismic loads. Capacity design.

11. Demonstration of the dynamic response of model structures. 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Language of evaluation: Greek

Final written examination: 80%

Preparation for the project: 20%

Recommended or required Bibliography

1. Karayiannis, Ch., (2013), Design – Behaviour of Reinforced Concrete Structures for Seismic Actions, Thessaloniki: Sofia Publications (in Greek).

2. Penelis, G.G. and Kappos, A. (1990). Earthquake-resistant Concrete Structures. Thessaloniki, Greece: P. Ziti Publications.

3. Kappos, A. and Penelis, G.G. (1996). Earthquake-resistant Concrete Structures, Taylor & Francis.

4. Paulay, T. and Priestley, M. J. N. (1992), Seismic Design of Reinforced Concrete and Masonry Buildings, John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

5. Bachmann Hugo (1998), Earthquake Protection of Structures, Athens: Gkiourdas Publications (in Greek).

6. Fardis M.N., E. Carvalho, A. Elnashai, E. Faccioli, P. Pinto, A. Plumier (2005), Designers’ Guide to EN 1998-1 and EN 1998-5 Eurocode 8: Design of structures for earthquake resistance. General rules, seismic actions, design rules for buildings, foundations and retaining structures. Thomas Telford, London.

7. Avramidis, I., Athanatopoulou, A. Morfidis, K., Sextos, A. (2011), Seismic design of R/C and numerical examples of analysis and design to the Eurocodes (in Greek).

8. Elnashai, A., L. Di Sarno, (2008), Fundamentals of earthquake engineering, Wiley.

9. Anastasiadis, K.K. (2001), Earthquake Resistant Structures, Thessaloniki: Ziti Publications (in Greek).

10. Clough R.W. και Penzien J.  (1993), Dynamics of Structures, McGraw-Hill, New York. 2nd Edition.

11. Dowrick, D. J. (1988), Earthquake Resistant Design: For Engineers and Architects, Wiley, 2nd Edition.

FOUNDATION ENGINEERING

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Lectures
Weekly Hours:  Lectures: 3, Laboratory: 3
ECTS:  6
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The specific course is not only an introduction in foundation engineering but also provides deep knowledge on issues concerning the application of National and International codes (Eurocodes) 

Upon completion of the course, students will have:

1. To have the ability to analyse and design shallow footings, rafts and special foundations using analytical and numerical methods in accordance with EC7

2. Be able to assess the loaded behaviour of single piles and pile groups including settlement prediction for both short term and long term conditions.

3. Have a proven critical ability to discuss and interpret practical issues related to geotechnical construction.

More specifically, students will be able to:

1. Derive bearing capacity coefficients for shallow footings and various deep foundations.

2. Analyse and design shallow and deep foundations to EC7 including predicting deformations and soil-structure interaction.

3. Develop awareness about current issues pertaining to geotechnical risk management, health and safety in subsurface construction 

4. Be aware and apply Eurocodes and especially those related to foundation engineering

Module Description

Theory

1. Introduction to foundation design

2. In situ soil tests and measurements. 

3. Soil pressures under foundations. 

4. Bearing capacity of shallow foundations - general

5. Bearing capacity of shallow foundations towards EC7

6. Safety Factors in Foundation Design. 

7. Shallow Foundation settlements

8. Limiting values of structural deformation and foundation movement

9. Deep foundations – Introduction 

10. Bearing capacity of deep foundations 

11. Deep foundation settlements

12. Group of piles – bearing capacity and settlements

13. Foundations: Selection of Type and other structural issues. 

Laboratory

The lab is concerning the following paragraphs 

1. Pre-Choice of the appropriate kind of foundation 

2. General description of empirical, analytical and numerical methods concerning foundation calculations

3. Model analysis  for the foundation design

4. Numerical methods in foundation design – General

5. Numerical methods in foundation design – Software use I

6. Numerical methods in foundation design – Software use II

7. Modern generalized applications concerning the total foundation design

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination: 60%

Laboratory exercise: 40%

Optional job preparation and presentation of up to 24%, less than the proportion of written examination

Recommended or required Bibliography

1. Joseph E Bowels, “Foundations Analysis and Design”, Foundas books (in greek)

2. S. Kostopoulos, Geotechnical construction: Analysis and design, Ion publishing group, 2009, (in greek)

3. Anagnostopoulos, A, Papadopoulos, V., “Shallow Foundations",(in greek)

4. Barnes G.E., (2005), «Soil mechanics», Klidarithmos books, (in greek) 

5. Prof. G. Kavvadas, Educational material site http://users.ntua.gr/kavvadas/, http://mycourses.ntua.gr/document/document.php?cmd=exChDir&file=%2F%C4%C9%C1%CB %C5%CE%C5%C9%D3  

6. Anagnostopoulos, A, Papadopoulos, V., Kavvadas M., Notes to Eurocode 7, TC of Greece Seminar, http://library.tee.gr/digital/m2464/m2464_ec7_not.pdf  (in greek)

7. Anagnostopoulos, A, Eurocode 7, Part 1: Geotechnical Design, Struture, Principles and consequences, 2009, 2009, TC of Greece Seminar, http://library.tee.gr/digital/m2464/m2464_ec7_1.pdf   (in greek)

8. M. Kavvadas, Applications to EC7, (EN 1997), 2009, TC of Greece Seminar, http://library.tee.gr/digital/m2464/m2464_ec7_2.pdf   (in greek)

9. EAK 2000, http://www.oasp.gr/userfiles/EAK2000.pdf  (in greek)

10. ΕΚΩΣ 2000, http://www.oasp.gr/userfiles/EKOS2000.pdf  (in greek)

11. G.Bouckovalas, Educational material, http://users.ntua.gr/gbouck/academics.shtml

12. A. Verruijt, Soil Mechanics, (http://geo.verruijt.net/software/SoilMechBook.pdf) 

13. B. Das, Advanced Soil Mechanics, 2013 (4th edition) 

14. B. Das, Principles of Foundation Engineering, 2011, (7th edition) 

15. J.E. Bowles, Foundation Analysis and Design, 2001, (5th edition) 

16. C. Liu, J. Evett, Soils and Foundation SI (6th Edition)

REPAIR - STRENGTHENING OF TRADITIONAL AND MODERN STRUCTURES

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Lectures and exercises, face-to-face.
Weekly Hours:  Lectures: 2, Exercises: 1
ECTS:  4
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:

1. They have acquired in-depth knowledge and critical understanding of the theory and principles of design and analysis of Repaired and Strengthened  structures, since  they could use  new technologies and information systems in the design of strengthened structures with various materials (Concrete, Steel, Frps).

2. Be able to design and reanalyze strengthened structures, such as Plates, Columns, Beams and Foundations.

3. Describe and identify the failure causes of parts or the whole of a structure

4. Apply principles for Strength of Materials, appropriate Equations of Stability, Constitutive Laws of materials and Compatibility equations of deformation for determining the transmitted bending stresses from the initial section to the strengthened one.

5. Suggest various methods for repair and strengthening the structure at different loading situations using KAN.EPE.

Module Description

Theory

The core modules of the course include:

1. Basic principles for the evaluation of Loading capacity and Redesign of existing structures.

2. Seismic pathology of Reinforced Concrete and Masonry structures. 

3. Various types of Failures in structures subject to various loadings.

4. Failures in cracked beams.

5. Failures in cracked columns.

6. Failures in cracked plates.

7. Failures in cracked masonry structures.

8. Study of transmitted internal forces through interphase of new and old structural element..

9. Modes and mechanisms of internal forces transfer through interphase.

10. Constituent materials for retrofit of structures failed by earthquake.

11. Techniques and strengthening methods in structural elements.

12. Evaluation of strengthening applied in cracked structural elemnts.

13. Basic principles of  KAN.EPE.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

 

Recommended or required Bibliography

1. Dritsos S.Η. (2005), Repair and strengthening of structures, Patra: self-edition (in Greek).

2. Spyrakos K. (2004), Strengthening of structures in seismic actions, Athens: ΤΕΕ (in Greek).

3. Rovilos A. (2001), Metaseismic Testing of buildings – Seismic pathology of buildings – Instructions and methods for repairing buildings with seismic damages. Athens: Papasotiriou edition (in Greek).

4. Penelis G.G. and Kappos A.I. (1999), Seismic resistant structures of Concrete, Thessaloniki: Ziti publication (in Greek).

5. Karantoni – Maragou T.(1997), Desidn and Rehabilitation of Masonry structures, Patras: Patras University edition (in Greek).

8th Semester

DISSERTATION FOR THESIS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  
Weekly Hours:  
ECTS:  
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

 

Module Description

 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

 

Recommended or required Bibliography

 

PLACEMENT

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  
Weekly Hours:  
ECTS:  
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

 

Module Description

 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

 

Recommended or required Bibliography