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Modules Department of Electrical Engineering

1st Semester

MATHEMATICS I

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures and exercises, Face to face  
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 3

Exercises, 3 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

At the end of this course students of Electrical Engineering Department will believe in the power of mathematics and develop an ability to communicate mathematics, both in writing and orally.  They will develop new problem solving techniques and critical reasoning skills and they will be prepared for further studies in mathematics, physical sciences, or engineering.

 

1.Ability to solve linear systems using Linear Algebra. 

2.Ability to solve problems in vector’s analysis (inner, Cross and mixed product, etc).

3. Ability to solve equations using complex numbers.  

4. Understanding of the physical point of view for the derivates and their applications. 

5.Integrals and how to use them in order to solve engineering  problems. Also studying useful applications in other fields.   

Module Description

The theory part of the course consists of the following modules:

 

 1st Module:  Linear Algebra: Determinants, Properties of determinants. Matrix addition,    

                        Subtraction Scalar Multiplication, Matrix multiplication, Properties of matrices,    

                        Matrix inversion.  

 2nd Module: Solution of Linear systems using Crammer Rule. Solutions of linear systems 

                        using other methods.

 3rd Module:   Characteristic polynomials and Characteristic equations. 

                         Eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Degree of a matrix, Similar matrices, Matrix 

                         Diagonalization.

 4th Module:   Introduction to vector’s analysis. Vector addition, Subtraction, Scalar     

                       Multiplication.  Inner product, Cross product, Mixed product. Applications.

 5th Module:   Set Theory: Union and Intersection, Compliment, Subsets.

                       Complex Analysis: Complex number, Addition, Subtraction, Multiplication, 

                       Complex conjugate. Graphical representation of a complex number.

 6th Module:   Rectangular, Polar and exponential form of a complex number.

                       The  root of a complex number. Sum of roots and product of roots.

                       Ability to solve equations using complex numbers.  

 7th Module:    Real Analysis: Functions of a single variable. Limits and Continuity of a

                        function. Derivative, Rules for finding derivatives, Higher derivatives, Chain Rule.

 8th Module:   Implicit Differentiation. Applications of derivatives.

 9th Module:   Taylor and Maclaurin Series.

10th Module:  Methods of Integration. Improper integrals. Integrals and their applications. 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination: 70%

Exercises: 30% 

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Larson, Hostetler, Edwards, «Calculus»,  Pub. Houghton Mifflin 1998.

2.Munem and Foulis, «Calculus», Pub. Worth 1984.

3.J.Marsden and A. Weistein, «Calculus I, II, III», Pub. Springer and Vergal 1980.

4.S.I. Crossman, «Calculus», Pub. Academic Press 1977.

5.H. Anton, «Calculus and Analytic Geometry», Pub. John Wiley and Sons 1980.

6.A. Shenk, «Calculus»,  Pub. Scott Foresman Co. 1984.

7.Mirzahi and Sullivan, «Calculus and Analytic Geometry», Pub. Wadsworth 1982.

8.Thomas and Finney, «Calculus and Analytic Geometry», Pub. Addison Wesley 1979.

9.K.A. Stroud, «Engineering Mathematics», Pub. Palgrave 1970.

10.K.A. Stroud, «Further Engineering Mathematics», Pub. Palgrave 1986.

11.Course notes. 

ELECTRICAL CIRCUITS I

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures, laboratory practice 
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 3

Exercises, 2

Laboratory, 2 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

This course is designed to introduce the student in the field of DC Electrical Circuits analysis. It aims to provide in the electrical engineer the proper tools in order to provide solutions to electrical issues that will arise in his/her life working.

Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able to:

•       recognize the possibilities that electricity providing to understand and study various electrical engineering applications.

•       describe the fundamental concepts and methods for the analysis of various electrical circuits and to interpret laws and rules of electrical engineering.

•       solve electric circuits, using systematic methods and mathematical models.

•       analyze and control electrical circuits applicable to electrical installations.

•       design and construct electrical circuits.

•      propose solutions to technical issues associated with the application of electricity. 

Module Description

A. THEORY

•      Electrical circuits modeling.

•      Active and passive components.

•      Components with fixed and variable parameters.

•      Voltage Relations - data stream.

•      Linearity.

•      Elements of the topology of networks.

•      KCL & KVL.

•      Mesh current and node voltage methods for linear networks analysis.

•      Electrical networks theorems.

•      Simple network time-domain analysis.

•      Zero-input response.

•      Zero-state response.

 

B. LABORATORY

•      Laboratory safety regulations.

•       Basic concepts. Laboratory equipment.

•       Ohm’s law.

•       Nonlinear Resistors.

•       Voltage divider.

•       Current divider.

•       KCL & KVL.

•       Mesh current method.

•       Superposition theorem.

•       Thevenin’s theorem.

•       Norton’s theorem.

•       Maximum power transfer theorem.

 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

 I.      Final written exam of theoretical part includes (60% of the total score):

-       Solving theoretical problems relating to the subject of   the course

-       Description / evidence theory data

-       Interim written assessments during the semester.

 

II.     Examination laboratory part  comprising (40% of the   total score):

-       Weekly individual written exam

-       Weekly group technical reports

-       Written final exam

-       Practical final examination 

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Βουρνάς Κ., Δαφέρμος Ο.. Πάγκαλος Σ. & Χατζαράκης Γ. (2010). Ηλεκτροτεχνία. Αθήνα: ΙΤΥΕ ‘’ΔΙΟΦΑΝΤΟΣ’’

2.Χατζαράκης Γ. Ε. (2002). ΗΛΕΚΤΡΙΚΑ ΚΥΚΛΩΜΑΤΑ. Τόμος Α΄. 2η Έκδοση. Θεσσαλονίκη: ΤΖΙΟΛΑΣ

3.Χατζαράκης Γ. Ε. (2002). ΗΛΕΚΤΡΙΚΑ ΚΥΚΛΩΜΑΤΑ. Τόμος Β΄. Θεσσαλονίκη: ΤΖΙΟΛΑΣ

4.Κολιόπουλος Ν. & Λόης Η. (2004). Ηλεκτροτεχνία. Αθήνα: ΙΩΝ

5.Κολιόπουλος Ν. (2010). ΒΑΣΙΚΗ ΗΛΕΚΤΡΟΛΟΓΙΑ. Αθήνα: ΙΩΝ

6.Κολιόπουλος Ν. I. (2012). ΕΙΣΑΓΩΓΗ ΣΤΑ Ηλεκτρικά Κυκλώματα. Αθήνα: ΙΩΝ

7.Ghosh M. (1988). Electrical Trade Theory. New Delhi: TATA McGRAW-HILL Publishing Company Limited

8.Gussow M. (1983). THEORY AND PROBLEMS OF BASIC ELECTRICITY. New York: McGRAW-HILL BOOK COMPANY

9.Nahvi M., Edminister J. A., (2004). Electric Circuits. USA: McGRAW-HILL

10.https://phet.colorado.edu/sims/ohms-law/ohms-law_el.html  (ανακτήθηκε στις 20.10.2015)

11.http://blog.literatus.gr/?page_id=138 (ανακτήθηκε στις 20.10.2015)

12.Μάργαρης Ν. Ι. (2010). ΑΝΑΛΥΣΗ ΗΛΕΚΤΡΙΚΩΝ ΚΥΚΛΩΜΑΤΩΝ. Θεσσαλονίκη: ΤΖΙΟΛΑΣ

13.Λουτρίδης Σ. Ι. (2011). Εισαγωγή στην Ανάλυση Ηλεκτρικών Κυκλωμάτων. ΣΥΝΕΧΕΣ ΡΕΥΜΑ. Τόμος Ι. Αθήνα: ΙΩΝ

14.Λουτρίδης Σ. Ι. (2011). Εισαγωγή στην Ανάλυση Ηλεκτρικών Κυκλωμάτων. ΕΝΑΛΛΑΣΣΣΟΜΕΝΟ ΡΕΥΜΑ. Τόμος ΙΙ. Αθήνα: ΙΩΝ

15.Λουτρίδης Σ. Ι. (2012). Εισαγωγή στην Ανάλυση Ηλεκτρικών Κυκλωμάτων. ΜΕΤΑΣΧΗΜΑΤΙΣΜΟΙ - ΤΕΤΡΑΠΟΛΑ. Τόμος ΙΙΙ. Αθήνα: ΙΩΝ

16.Χαριτάντης Ι. (2014). Ηλεκτρικά Κυκλώματα με βασικά στοιχεία Ηλεκτρομαγνητισμού, Θεωρία-Ανάλυση-Εξομοίωση. Αθήνα: Πανεπιστημιακές εκδόσεις Αράκυνθος

17.Φραγκόπουλος Στ. Γ. (1987). ΒΑΣΙΚΗ ΗΛΕΚΤΡΟΤΕΧΝΙΑ ΙΙ, Χρονικά Μεταβαλλόμενα Ρεύματα, Μαθηματική Περιγραφή και Εφαρμογές. Β΄ Έκδοση. Αθήνα: ΦΟΙΒΟΣ

18.Φαναράς Π. (1980). Θεωρητική Ηλεκτροτεχνία. Τόμος Ι. Αθήνα: ΠΑΠΑΣΩΤΗΡΙΟΥ

19.Βαφειάδης Π. Χρ. (2000). ΑΝΑΛΥΣΗ ΗΛΕΚΤΡΙΚΩΝ ΚΥΚΛΩΜΑΤΩΝ. 2η Έκδοση. Αθήνα: ΒΑΦΕΙΑΔΗΣ

20.Hayt Jr. W. H. and Kemmerly J. E. (1991). ΑΝΑΛΥΣΗ ΗΛΕΚΤΡΙΚΩΝ ΚΥΚΛΩΜΑΤΩΝ. 4η Έκδοση. Θεσσαλονίκη: ΤΖΙΟΛΑΣ

21.Bemtley J. P. (2009). Συστήματα Μετρήσεων, ΒΑΣΙΚΕΣ ΑΡΧΕΣ. 1η Έκδοση. Αθήνα: ΙΩΝ

22.Fowler R. J. (1999). ΗΛΕΚΤΡΟΤΕΧΝΙΑ AC-DC. 4η Έκδοση. Θεσσαλονίκη: ΤΖΙΟΛΑΣ

23.Σινιόρος Π., Μανουσάκης Ν. (2015), Ασκησιολόγιο για το μάθημα Ηλεκτρικά Κυκλώματα Ι, Αθήνα: ΑΕΙ Πειραιά ΤΤ

24.Μανωλάς Σ. Ι. (1977). ΣΗΜΕΙΩΣΕΙΣ ΗΛΕΚΤΡΙΚΩΝ ΚΑΙ ΗΛΕΚΤΡΟΝΙΚΩΝ ΜΕΤΡΗΣΕΩΝ. Αθήνα: ΑΝΩΤΕΡΑ ΣΧΟΛΗ ΥΠΟΜΗΧΑΝΙΚΩΝ ΑΘΗΝΩΝ, ΑΝΩΤΕΡΑ ΣΧΟΛΗ ΤΕΧΝΟΛΟΓΩΝ ΜΗΧΑΝΙΚΩΝ ΑΘΗΝΩΝ 

ELECTROCHEMISTRY

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Face to face lectures and experiments in the laboratory  
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 2

Laboratory exercises, 2 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course students will have knowledge of the theory and basic principles of the electrochemical phenomena involved in: 

1.Electrochemical systems of electric energy production 

2.Electrochemical processes of surface treatment and production of materials

3.Electrochemical corrosion of metals and corrosion protection methods.

 

Specifically students will be able to:

1.Describe and understand the operation of electrochemical systems for the production of electric energy, i.e. batteries and fuel cells.

2.Apply and control techniques for the electrochemical surface treatment of metals, such as plating and anodizing, with the aim of improving their properties (corrosion resistance, electric conductivity, surface hardness etc.)

3.Understand the mechanism of electrochemical corrosion of metals, use of appropriate design criteria and apply corrosion protection techniques in order to limit corrosion of metals.  

Module Description

A. Theory

-Introductory knowledge of chemistry: Atom, Electronic structure of atom. Chemical Bonds. Solutions. Properties of solutions. 

-Electric current conductors. Types of conductors. Electrolytes. Conductivity of electrolytes. Mobility of ions. Transport numbers. 

-Electrolysis. Laws of electrolysis. Decomposition voltage of electrolytes. Polarization and passivation phenomena. Overvoltage. Coulometers. Metal electroplating. Anodizing.

-Half- cells. Half-cells standard potentials. Galvanic cells. Types of galvanic cells. Voltage of galvanic cells. Nernst’s law. Batteries, Accumulators, Types of accumulators, Fuel cells.

-Electrochemical metal corrosion: Electrochemical mechanism of corrosion and parameters affecting corrosion. Types of corrosion. Corrosion prevention and protection.

B. Laboratory  

-Measurements, Statistics and Graphs.

-Construction of basic electric circuits for electrochemical processes. Control and operation. 

-Measurement of specific electric conductivity of electrolytes. Strong and weak electrolytes.  

-Coulometers. Copper coulometer. Ohm's and Faraday’s laws in electrolytes. Measurement of electric charges.  

-Electrochemical processes for surface treatments of metals and determination of  electrochemical current efficiency: a) Electroplating b) anodizing 

-Redox potentials. Study of the reactivity of metals. 

-Galvanic cells. Zinc-copper cell. Concentration cells.

-Lead acid battery.

-Fuel cells. Fuel cell H2/H+/ / O2/OH-.

-Εlectrochemical corrosion οf metals. Corrosion potential of metals in various environments. Study of metal corrosion using electrochemical techniques.  

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Theory: (60% of the final course’s note) 

Final written examination consisting of problems solving and short answers questions 

Laboratory: (40% of the final course’s note) Summative evaluation from:

-written essays on each experiment 

-at least four short tests during the semester on the most representative experiments  

-final written test consisting of problems solving and short answers questions 

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Ν. Markopoulou, «Introduction to electrochemistry», University Studio Press, Thessaloniki, 2002 (in Greek).

2.N. Kouloubi, «Electrochemistry», Symeon editions, Athens, 2005 (in Greek).

3.S. Kalogeropoulou,  «Laboratory experiments  in Electrochemistry», Athens, 2015 (in Greek).

4.N. Kyratzi, «Introduction to electrochemistry», Zitis editions, Thessaloniki, 2004 (in Greek).

5.Th. Skoulikidis, «Applied electrochemistry A - Corrosion and protection”, Athanasopoulos, Papadamis, Zacharopoulos Publ. ltd, Athens, 2000 (in Greek).

6.J. Bockris, «Modern Electrochemistry», 2η ed., Plenum press, New York, 1998.

7.D. Linden, «Handbook of batteries», Mc Graw –Hill, 2001. 

MECHANICS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures, laboratories , distance learning methods  
Weekly Hours: Lectures, 3 
ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Search, analysis and synthesis of data and information, using the necessary technologies. During this course, the study of statics and mechanics of materials is based on the understanding of a few basic concepts and on the use of simplified models. This approach makes it possible to develop all the necessary formulas in a rational and logical manner, and to clearly indicate the conditions under which they can be safely applied to the analysis and design of actual engineering structures and machine components. 

Module Description

1. Statics of Particles

2. Rigid Bodies: Equivalent Systems of Forces

3. Equilibrium of Rigid Bodies

4.. Distributed Forces: Centroids and Centers of Gravity

5. Analysis of Structures

6. Distributed Forces: Moments of Inertia of Areas

7. N,Q,M Diagrammes

8. Distributed Forces: Centroids and Centers of Gravity

6 Analysis of Structures

7 Forces in Beams and Cables

8 Friction

9 Distributed Forces: Moments of Inertia

10. Kinimatic equations of rigid body.

11 Mechanisms’ problems

12 Mechanisms and Simple Machines

13 Basic Kinematics of Constrained Rigid Bodies

14 Degrees of Freedom of a Rigid Body

15 Planar and Spatial Mechanisms

16 Kinematics and Dynamics of Mechanisms

17 Links, Frames and Kinematic Chains

18 Skeleton Outline

19 Pairs, Higher Pairs, Lower Pairs and Linkages

20 Kinematic Analysis and Synthesis 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination: 100%

Optional job preparation and presentation of up to 20%, less than the proportion of written examination 

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Μηχανική του απαραμόρφωτου στερεού, Στατική, Βουθούνης, Παναγιώτης Α. , εκδ ιδίου

2.Στατική: Μηχανική του στερεού σώματος, ασκήσεις Ι,  Εμμανουήλ Ε. Γδούτος, Χρ. Ν. Κάλφας,  εκδ. Συμμετρία

3.Στατική των ισοστατικών φορέων Διαγράμματα [N], [Q], [M]: Γραμμές επιρροής: Αρχή δυνατών έργων, Γιάννης Β. Γκαρούτσος, εκδ. SPIN

4.Τεχνική μηχανική Μηχανική Ι: Στατική των στερεών και ειδικά κεφάλαια, Νικόλαος Αραποστάθης,Δημήτριος Αραποστάθης, εκδ. Ίων

5.Στατική Τεχνική μηχανική,Ferdinand P. Beer, Russell E. Johnston, Elliot R. Eisenberg, εκδ. Τζιόλα

6.Εφαρμοσμένη στατική, Walter Wagner, Gerhard Erlhof, εκδ. Κλειδάριθμος

7.Στατική, Εμμανουήλ Ε. Γδούτος, εκδ. Συμμετρία

8.Μηχανική του απόλυτου στερεού, Κινηματική και δυναμική, εκδ. Συμμετρία

9.Theory of Elasticity, Stephen Timoshenko, Mcgraw-Hill College 

10.Theory of Elastic Stability, Stephen P. Timoshenko, James M. Gere, Dover    

11.Publications

12.Engineering Mechanics: Statics (13th Edition), Russell C. Hibbeler, Prentice 

13.Hall 2012

14.Engineering Mechanics: Statics [J. L. Meriam, L. G. Kraige,  Wiley 2011

15.Schaum's Outline of Statics and Strength of Materials (Schaum's),  John  

16.Jackson , Harold Wirtz, McGraw-Hill 1983. 

PHYSICS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 4

Laboratory, 2 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, students will acquire:

1. In-depth knowledge and critical understanding of the theory and principles of mechanics.

2. Knowledge and critical understanding of the units involved in the physical quantities of mechanics.

2. Knowledge and skills in modelling and resolving problems related to mechanics.

3. Ability of application of mathematical concepts in problems of physics.

4. Ability of designing experiments and analysing their results.

5. Skills to derive results through the experimental procedure.  

 

Specifically, students will be able to:

1. Describe and analyse problems related to the motion and dynamics of particles and/or system of particles.

2. Analyse the physical quantities related to a particular problem.

2. Apply the appropriate conservation laws to each problem.

3. Resolve problems with different equivalent methods.

4. Design and set up experimental procedures in order to determine physical quantities.

5. Combine the results derived from theoretical and experimental analysis.

6. Apply the acquired knowledge in advanced specialized lessons related to electromechanical applications.  

Module Description

The theoretical part, divided 13 in weeks, consists of the following:

Week 1: Physical quantities, mathematical introduction, dimensional analysis 

Week 2: Motion in one dimension

Week 3: Motion in three dimensions, circular motion

Week 4: Fundamental forces, Newton’s laws

Week 5: Applications of dynamics, non-inertial forces

Week 6: Work, kinetic energy, power

Week 7: Potential energy, conservative forces, energy conservation

Week 8: Impulse, momentum, momentum conservation

Week 9: System of particles, center of mass, collisions

Week 10: Torque, moment of inertia, rotation around a fixed axis

Week 11: Angular momentum, rotational motion, rigid body dynamics

Week 12: Introduction to the theory of oscillations

Week 13: Review 

 

The content of the laboratory course is the following:

Exercise 1: Measurements, error analysis

Exercise 2: Graphs, linearization of equations

Exercise 3: Measurement of lengths with a micrometer.

Exercise 4: Study of linear accelerated motion

Exercise 5: Measurement of gravity acceleration with a simple pendulum

Exercise 6: Determination of the spring constant

Exercise 7: Measurement of Young modulus

Exercise 8: Measurement of the density of solids and liquids

Exercise 9: Determination of the viscosity of liquids

Exercise 10: Measurement of the focal length of a convergent lens

Exercise 11: Measurement of sound velocity

Exercise 12: Determination of the specific heat of water

Exercise 13: Final exam 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final examination: 60%

Laboratory exercise: 40% 

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Φυσική για επιστήμονες και μηχανικούς: μηχανική, ταλαντώσεις και μηχανικά κύματα, θερμοδυναμική, σχετικότητα, Raymond A. Serway, John W. Jewett,

2.Πανεπιστημιακή Φυσική με σύγχρονη φυσική, Τόμος Α, Young H., Freedman R.,

3.Φυσική, Halliday David, Resnick Robert, Walker Jearl, Τόμος Α,

4.Φυσική για Επιστήμονες και Μηχανικούς, Τόμος Α, Giancoli

5.Σημειώσεις εργαστηριακών ασκήσεων  

2nd Semester

MATHEMATICS II

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures and exercises, Face to face  
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 3

Exercises, 3 

ECTS: 6
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

At the end of this course students of Electrical Engineering Department will believe in the power of mathematics and develop new problem solving techniques and critical reasoning skills and they will be ready for further studies in mathematics, physical sciences, or any field of engineering.

 

1.Ability of getting partial derivatives and Higher order partial derivatives.  

2.Ability to solve Maxima and minima problems.

3.Ability of evaluating Double and triple integrals. 

4.Ability of working with vector fields.

5.Ability to solve first order’s differential equations . 

6.Ability to solve higher order’s differential equations 

7.Ability to solve systems of differential equations. 

8.Ability to solve Differential equations with partial derivatives. 

Module Description

The theory part of the course consists of the following modules:

 

1st Module:  Functions of several independent real variables. Limits. Continuity. 

                      Partial derivatives. Higher order partial derivatives.  Derivatives of inverse     

                      function.  Chain rule I. Chain rule II. Generalized chain rule.

2nd Module:  Implicit differentiation. Maxima and minima. 

                        Lagrange multipliers for conditional extremes. Jacobian determinant.

 3rd Module:  Del, (reverse delta). Gradient. Directional derivative. Divergence. Curl of a                         

                        Vector field. Compressible and incompressible fields. Conservative fields.

 4th Module:  Double and triple integrals. Change limits of integration. Change variables.

                        Applications. Line integrals. Green’s, Gauss, and Stake’s theorems.

 5th Module:  Introduction to differential equations. Slope Fields. Qualitative solutions. 

                        Applications. First order linear differential equations. Separation of variables.

                        Homogeneous differential equations, almost homogeneous differential 

                        equations.

 6th Module:  Exact differential equations,  Almost exact differential equations.

                        Linear differential equations, Integrating Factor.

 7th Module:  Bernoulli differential equations, Riccati differential equations.

                        Clairaut differential equations, Lagrange differential equations. 

                        Applications to circuit analysis, cooling, heating e.t.c.

 8th Module:  Linear differential equations of higher order with constant and variable 

                        coefficients. Independent solutions of a differential equation. Wronskian  

                        Determinant. Homogeneous and nonhomogeneous differential equations.   

                        Homogeneous solution. 

 9th Module: Particular solution for a nonhomogeneous problem. Method of undetermined  

                       coefficients. Method of variation of parameters. General solution.

10th Module:  Systems of linear differential equations.

11th Module:  Differential equations with partial derivatives. 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination: 70%

Exercises: 30% 

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.W.E. Boyce and R.C. DiPrima, «Elementary Differential Equations and Boundary Value Problems», Publ. John Willey and Sons.

2.M.R. Spiegel, «Applied Differential Equations», Publ. Prentice Hall.

3.M. Braun, « Differential Equations and Their Applications», Publ. Springer-Verlag.

4.G. Simmons, «Differential Equations with Application and Historical Notes», Publ. McGraw -Hill.

5.R. Haberman, « Elementary Applied Partial Differential Equations»,

Publ. . Prentice Hall.

6.K.E. Gustafson, « Partial Differential Equations», Publ. John Willey and Sons.

7.Sommerfield, « Partial Differential Equations», Publ. John Academic Press.

8.K.A. Stroud, «Engineering Mathematics», Pub. Palgrave 1970.

9.K.A. Stroud, «Further Engineering Mathematics», Pub. Palgrave 1986. 

ELECTRICAL CIRCUITS II

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures 
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 4

Exercises, 2

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

This course is designed to introduce the student in the field of AC Electrical Circuits analysis. It aims to provide in the electrical engineer the proper tools in order to provide solutions to electrical issues that will arise in his/her life working.

Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able to:

•       recognize the possibilities that electricity providing to understand and study various electrical engineering applications.

•       describe the fundamental concepts and methods for the analysis of various electrical circuits and to interpret laws and rules of electrical engineering.

•       solve electric circuits, using systematic methods and mathematical models.

•       analyze and control electrical circuits applicable to electrical installations.

•       design electrical circuits.

•      propose solutions to technical issues associated with the application of electricity. 

Module Description

•AC theory.

•       Complex numbers.

•       Circuit analysis using matrices.

•       Mesh current and node voltage methods.

•       Network theorems.

•       Resonance.

•       Quality factor.

•       AC Power.

•       Power factor improvement.

•       Load adjustment.

•       Multi-phase systems with emphasis in three-phase.

•       Electrical circuits with symmetrical and asymmetrical loads.

•       AC power and compensation calculations. 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final written exam of theoretical part includes:

-       Solving theoretical problems relating to the subject of   the course

-       Description / evidence theory data

-       Interim written assessments during the semester. 

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Βουρνάς Κ., Δαφέρμος Ο.. Πάγκαλος Σ. & Χατζαράκης Γ. (2010). Ηλεκτροτεχνία. Αθήνα: ΙΤΥΕ ‘’ΔΙΟΦΑΝΤΟΣ’’

2.Χατζαράκης Γ. Ε. (2002). ΗΛΕΚΤΡΙΚΑ ΚΥΚΛΩΜΑΤΑ. Τόμος Α΄. 2η Έκδοση. Θεσσαλονίκη: ΤΖΙΟΛΑΣ

3.Χατζαράκης Γ. Ε. (2002). ΗΛΕΚΤΡΙΚΑ ΚΥΚΛΩΜΑΤΑ. Τόμος Β΄. Θεσσαλονίκη: ΤΖΙΟΛΑΣ

4.Κολιόπουλος Ν. & Λόης Η. (2004). Ηλεκτροτεχνία. Αθήνα: ΙΩΝ

5.Κολιόπουλος Ν. (2010). ΒΑΣΙΚΗ ΗΛΕΚΤΡΟΛΟΓΙΑ. Αθήνα: ΙΩΝ

6.Κολιόπουλος Ν. I. (2012). ΕΙΣΑΓΩΓΗ ΣΤΑ Ηλεκτρικά Κυκλώματα. Αθήνα: ΙΩΝ

7.Ghosh M. (1988). Electrical Trade Theory. New Delhi: TATA McGRAW-HILL Publishing Company Limited

8.Gussow M. (1983). THEORY AND PROBLEMS OF BASIC ELECTRICITY. New York: McGRAW-HILL BOOK COMPANY

9.Nahvi M., Edminister J. A., (2004). Electric Circuits. USA: McGRAW-HILL

10.https://phet.colorado.edu/sims/ohms-law/ohms-law_el.html  (ανακτήθηκε στις 20.10.2015)

11.http://blog.literatus.gr/?page_id=138 (ανακτήθηκε στις 20.10.2015)

12.Μάργαρης Ν. Ι. (2010). ΑΝΑΛΥΣΗ ΗΛΕΚΤΡΙΚΩΝ ΚΥΚΛΩΜΑΤΩΝ. Θεσσαλονίκη: ΤΖΙΟΛΑΣ

13.Λουτρίδης Σ. Ι. (2011). Εισαγωγή στην Ανάλυση Ηλεκτρικών Κυκλωμάτων. ΣΥΝΕΧΕΣ ΡΕΥΜΑ. Τόμος Ι. Αθήνα: ΙΩΝ

14.Λουτρίδης Σ. Ι. (2011). Εισαγωγή στην Ανάλυση Ηλεκτρικών Κυκλωμάτων. ΕΝΑΛΛΑΣΣΣΟΜΕΝΟ ΡΕΥΜΑ. Τόμος ΙΙ. Αθήνα: ΙΩΝ

15.Λουτρίδης Σ. Ι. (2012). Εισαγωγή στην Ανάλυση Ηλεκτρικών Κυκλωμάτων. ΜΕΤΑΣΧΗΜΑΤΙΣΜΟΙ - ΤΕΤΡΑΠΟΛΑ. Τόμος ΙΙΙ. Αθήνα: ΙΩΝ

16.Χαριτάντης Ι. (2014). Ηλεκτρικά Κυκλώματα με βασικά στοιχεία Ηλεκτρομαγνητισμού, Θεωρία-Ανάλυση-Εξομοίωση. Αθήνα: Πανεπιστημιακές εκδόσεις Αράκυνθος

17.Φραγκόπουλος Στ. Γ. (1987). ΒΑΣΙΚΗ ΗΛΕΚΤΡΟΤΕΧΝΙΑ ΙΙ, Χρονικά Μεταβαλλόμενα Ρεύματα, Μαθηματική Περιγραφή και Εφαρμογές. Β΄ Έκδοση. Αθήνα: ΦΟΙΒΟΣ

18.Φαναράς Π. (1980). Θεωρητική Ηλεκτροτεχνία. Τόμος Ι. Αθήνα: ΠΑΠΑΣΩΤΗΡΙΟΥ

19.Βαφειάδης Π. Χρ. (2000). ΑΝΑΛΥΣΗ ΗΛΕΚΤΡΙΚΩΝ ΚΥΚΛΩΜΑΤΩΝ. 2η Έκδοση. Αθήνα: ΒΑΦΕΙΑΔΗΣ

20.Hayt Jr. W. H. and Kemmerly J. E. (1991). ΑΝΑΛΥΣΗ ΗΛΕΚΤΡΙΚΩΝ ΚΥΚΛΩΜΑΤΩΝ. 4η Έκδοση. Θεσσαλονίκη: ΤΖΙΟΛΑΣ

21.Bemtley J. P. (2009). Συστήματα Μετρήσεων, ΒΑΣΙΚΕΣ ΑΡΧΕΣ. 1η Έκδοση. Αθήνα: ΙΩΝ

22.Fowler R. J. (1999). ΗΛΕΚΤΡΟΤΕΧΝΙΑ AC-DC. 4η Έκδοση. Θεσσαλονίκη: ΤΖΙΟΛΑΣ

23.Μανωλάς Σ. Ι. (1977). ΣΗΜΕΙΩΣΕΙΣ ΗΛΕΚΤΡΙΚΩΝ ΚΑΙ ΗΛΕΚΤΡΟΝΙΚΩΝ ΜΕΤΡΗΣΕΩΝ. Αθήνα: ΑΝΩΤΕΡΑ ΣΧΟΛΗ ΥΠΟΜΗΧΑΝΙΚΩΝ ΑΘΗΝΩΝ, ΑΝΩΤΕΡΑ ΣΧΟΛΗ ΤΕΧΝΟΛΟΓΩΝ ΜΗΧΑΝΙΚΩΝ ΑΘΗΝΩΝ 

COMPUTER PROGRAMMING I

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures, laboratories   
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 2

Laboratory, 2 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, students will have:

 

1. In-depth knowledge and understanding of the basic concepts and principles of  web programming

 

2. Experimental knowledge and skills to apply computer languages and technologies for the development of web applications.

 

3. Knowledge and synthesis skills for the design and development of web applications  

Module Description

1. Introduction to Computer programming. Programming languages. Basic concepts of web programming.

2. Hypertext, Program structure, Basic commands, Tag description, List structure, Formatting.

3. Web design, Storyboards, Hyperlinks, Web development example.

4. Images and Multimedia, File types, Graphics,  Image maps. 

5. Frames, Formatting Frames, Intrinsic events. 

6. Tables, Cell formation, Combining tables with other structured information.  

7. Forms, Inserting Controls, Entering data, Sending data. 

8. Dynamic HTML. Cascading Style Sheets (CSS).  

9. Data validation using VbScript / JavaScript, Variables, Arithmetic calculations,  String manipulation, Using controls.

10. Client-side Scripting, Conditional expressions, Concatenation, Comparison Operators, Comparison Commands. Logical Operators.  

11. Client-side Scripting, Loops, Server side Scripts, The ASP object model. 

12. Server-side Scripting, Interactive communication, ASP/PHP, Data base manipulation.

13. Dynamic Data base development and ASP. 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Evaluation Language: Greek

English for Erasmus students

 

Theory: Final written exam: 100%

Laboratory: Lab Assignment 100%

 

The grade of the course is 60% x Theory +40% x Laboratory grades

Recommended or required Bibliography

1. Angeli C., 2005, Web Programming HTML & ASP, Synchroni Ekdotiki (in Greek) 

2. Gottleber T.  and T. Trainor, 2012, More excellent HTML with an Introduction to JavaScript, McGraw-Hill, London.

3.  Web based bibliography 

4. Teaching notes

MATERIALS TECHNOLOGY

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:

Lectures, 2

Laboratory experiments, 2 

Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 2

Laboratory experiments, 2

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, students will have:

1.Basic and advanced knowledge on the wide and continuously growing scientific area of materials science and technology.

2.Knowledge and comprehension of the relationship between structure, treatments and properties of materials.

3.Critical knowledge and capability to apply or develop criteria for the selection of the most appropriate material for every technical application.

 

Specifically, students will be able to:

1.Understand materials properties and behavior in different operating environments.

2.Understand the relationship between structure, treatments and properties of materials.

3.Choose the most appropriate techniques of treatment and formatting of materials in order to modify their structure and properties.

4.Know and apply rules for the quality control of materials and their properties.

4.Apply and develop criteria for the selection of the  most appropriate material for every technical application as well as for designing and developing new materials with improved properties.  

Module Description

A. Theory

-Elements of materials structure. 

-Solid state. Crystalline structure and systems. Allotropy. Amorphous materials. 

-Metals: Usual metallic structures. Solidification and structural defects.

-Alloys: Phase equilibrium diagrams. Phase transformation. Thermal and mechanical treatment methods and their effect on materials structure and properties. 

-Ionic bond structure: Ceramics.

-Covalent bond structure: Polymers. Polymer crystallinity.

-Composite materials.

-Electricity conducting materials and resistors. Effect of the structure to the electrical properties of materials.

-Insulators - Dielectric materials. Characteristic properties of dielectric materials.

-Semi-conductors and their properties.

-Magnetic materials. Structure and properties of magnetic materials.

-Criteria of materials selection for specific applications.

Β. Laboratory 

-Study of the structure of metallic materials by optical microscopy.

- Mechanical properties: Measurement of hardness and tensile strength of metallic materials. 

- Thermometry: Use and calibration of thermocouples. 

- Alloys: Transformations phases - phase equilibrium diagrams. Application to the welding alloy Pb-Sn. 

- Galvanic corrosion of different metals being in conductive contact.

-Magnetic materials: characterization and use of soft magnetic materials. 

-Magnetic materials: characterization and use of hard magnetic materials. 

-Linear resistors. Temperature influence on the electric resistance. 

-Non-linear resistors. 

-Properties of insulating oils. 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Theory: (60% of the final course’s note) 

Final written examination consisting of problems solving and short answers questions 

Laboratory: (40% of the final course’s note) Summative evaluation from:

-written essays on each experiment 

-short tests during the semester on the experiments performed

-final written test consisting of problems solving and short answers questions

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Κ.Ε. Savvaki, «Materials technology. Materials of Technological Applications. Electric – Dielectric – Magnetic & Optical behaviour of materials”, ION Editions, Athens, 1992 (in Greek).

2.Κ. Kagaraki, «Courses on Electrotechnical Materials”, S. Athanasopoulos, S. Papadamis editions, Athens, 1988 (in Greek).

3.Y. Chryssoulakis, D. Pantelis, “Science and Technology of Metallic Materials”, Papasotiriou editions, Athens, 1996 (in Greek).

4.D. Pantelis, “Non metallic technical materials”, Papasotiriou editions, Athens, 1996 (in Greek).

5.F.W. Smith, «Foundations of Materials Science and Engineering», Mc Graw Hill, 1993.

6.R.F. Hummel, «Electronic Properties of Materials», Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 1993.

7.A. S. Vatalis, «Materials Science and Technology ”, Zitis edition, Thessaloniki, 2007 (in Greek).

8.N. Spirou, “Conducting properties of electrotechnical materials”, Tziolas editions, Thessaloniki, 2008 (in Greek).

9.B. Zaspalis, “Materials Science and technology – Structures & Morphology of Inorganic Solids”, Tziolas editions, Thessaloniki, 2015 (in Greek).

10.W. D. Callister, JR., “Materials Science and Technology”, 5th ed., Tziolas editions, Thessaloniki, 2008 (in Greek). 

11.S. Kalogeropoulou, “Laboratory exercises in Materials Technology”, Athens, 2014 (in Greek). 

TECHNICAL PROJECT MANAGEMENT

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures 
Weekly Hours: Lectures, 2 
ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The purpose of this course is to provide the students with a basic exposure to the tasks and challenges facing project managers, i.e., those people responsible for the vital function of managing complex projects across multiple functions in a global environment. Successful project managers have the abilities and skills to simultaneously manage their teams, schedules, risks, resources, and deliver a successful outcome. The ultimate goal is to learn the skills and tools of the project management discipline, with a practical “hands on” and real world approach. Not to be underestimated is the challenge of managing with influence, a key skill for project managers to gain the support of resources not directly under their management control. Most organizations are matrix managed, which means that resources are shared and temporary. The project manager must be able to use resources efficiently and effectively to achieve the goals and objectives required for a successful outcome – on time, on spec, and on budget. 

Upon satisfactory completion of the course, the students should be able to:: 

•Recognize issues in a realistic project scenario. 

•Employ work breakdown structures (WBS) in a project application. 

•Demonstrate the use of appropriate network scheduling techniques. 

•Produce a project proposal. 

•Discuss the implementation of a proposed plan.

Upon completion of the course, students will be able to: 

 

•Perceive, interpret and clearly explain issues related to Technical Project Management.

•Compare and evaluate different Project Management techniques and approaches.

•Develop their knowledge about Project Management techniques, approaches, and skills required to balance and implement short and long-range plans for managing projects to completion. 

•Develop their analytical and organizational skills required assessing complex project management challenges, and to develop and execute workable action plans.

•Anticipate non-intuitive linkages in critical decision making processes that have later implications on processes, people, products, and profits. 

•Have a proven critical ability so they can compare and evaluate different statements on the quality of the atmospheric environment (for example, high concentrations of particulate matter from anthropogenic activities and dust transport from the Sahara-Sahara Dust event).

•Work with their fellow students, to create and present both at individual and group level a case study from its initial stages up to the final evaluation and finally to be able to propose new ideas and solutions.

The use of project management software tools will be discussed; however, this is not a course on any specific software package. Students are encouraged to use whatever project management software they desire on the assignments. 

Module Description

 

The core modules of the course include:

 

Module- 1: Introduction

Introduction to PM and Syllabus Review

Module-2: Project Organization

Project organization involves selecting an appropriate project organization-structure and establishing the Organizational Breakdown Structure (OBS) for the project. 

Module-3: Project Planning

Project planning involves establishing the Work Breakdown Structure and mapping this structure to the established OBS. Furthermore, a project budget and Cost Breakdown Structure are developed and mapped to the OBS and WBS. The planning phase also includes establishing an appropriate timeline for the project in the context of resource constraints.

Module-4: Project Planning Methodologies

Specific methodologies for planning include:

•Gannt Diagram

•The Critical Path Method (CPM)

•The Program Evaluation and Review Technique (PERT)

Module-5: Review – Examples / Exercices

 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final Written examination: 100%

 

The exams will not be open-book. Final Written Exam includes problem-solving exercises.

 

Optional job preparation and presentation of up to 20%, less than the proportion of written examination

 

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Α. Kokkosis “Project Management”, 2007, Editions Sichroni Ekdotiki (in Greek)

2.S. Polizos “ Planning & Organizing Project ” , 2006, Editions TZIOLAS (in Greek)

3.S. Polizos “ Project Management and Administration”, 2011 Editions Kritiki (in Greek) 

4.Eric Verzuh. “ Project Management”, 2002, Editions Stamoulis (in Greek) 

5.Burke, Rory. “Project Management ” , 2002 Editions Kritiki (in Greek)

6.Lecturer Notes (in Greek) 

ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures and exercises  
Weekly Hours: Lectures, 4 
ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, students will acquire:

1. In-depth knowledge and critical understanding of the theory and principles of electromagnetism in both the static and time-dependent form.

2. Knowledge and skills in modelling and resolving problems related to electromagnetism.

3. Ability of application of mathematical concepts in problems of electromagnetism.

 

Specifically, students will be able to:

1. Describe and analyse problems related to electromagnetism.

2. Apply the appropriate principles and laws to each problem.

3. Resolve problems with different equivalent methods.

4. Apply the acquired knowledge in advanced specialized lessons related to electrical applications.  

Module Description

Week 1: Coulomb’s law, electric field 

Week 2: Electric flux and the Gauss law

Week 3: Electric potential energy and electric potential

Week 4: Conductors in electrostatic field

Week 5: Dielectrics, capacitance

Week 6: Current, resistance, Ohm’s law

Week 7: Magnetic field, law of Biot-Savart

Week 8: Magnetic force, Lorentz force

Week 9: Sources of magnetic fields, the Ampere law

Week 10: Faraday’s law, electromagnetic induction

Week 11: Εlectromagnetic induction, inductance

Week 12: Maxwell’s equations

Week 13: Electromagnetic waves - Review  

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final examination: 100%

Optional:  problem solving of exercises similar to those of written examination. Maximum grade: 3 units

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Φυσική για επιστήμονες και μηχανικούς: ηλεκτρισμός και μαγνητισμός, φως και οπτική, σύγχρονη φυσική, Raymond A. Serway, John W. Jewett,

2.Πανεπιστημιακή Φυσική με σύγχρονη φυσική, Τόμος Β, Young H., Freedman R.,

3.Φυσική, Halliday David, Resnick Robert, Walker Jearl, Τόμος Β,

4.Φυσική για Επιστήμονες και Μηχανικούς, Τόμος Β, Giancoli 

3rd Semester

MATHEMATICS III

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures and exercises, Face to face  
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 3

Exercises, 3 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

At the end of this course students of Electrical Engineering Department will believe in the power of mathematics and develop more advance problem solving techniques and critical reasoning skills. They will develop new problem solving techniques using Fourier, Laplace and Zeta transforms, they will be prepared for advanced studies in mathematics, physical sciences, or engineering and research.  Analytically.

 

1. Ability to use Fourier transformation in order to solve periodicity problems.

2. Ability to use Laplace transformation in order to solve ordinary differential equations.   

3. Ability to use Laplace transformation in order to solve systems of differential equations.   

 4. Ability to use Zeta transformation in order to solve difference equations.  

 5. Ability of solving delicate problems using the above methods in several Engineering fields.     

Module Description

The theory part of the course consists of the following modules:

 

1st Module:    Introduction to series, convergence of a series.  

2nd Module:   Fourier series. Fourier Transformation. Using Fourier transformation in order to solve periodic problems.

3rd Module:   Introduction to Laplace transforms. Introduction to Inverse Laplace transforms. 4th Module:   Solving differential equations using Laplace transformation.

5th Module:   Solving systems of differential equations using Laplace transformation.

6th Module:   Introduction to Zeta transforms. Inverse Zeta transforms.

7th Module:   Solving difference equations using Zeta transformation.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination: 70%

Exercises: 30%

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Zill, Cullen, «Advanced Engineering Mathematics», Publ. Jones & Barett, 2006, Third Edition.

2.C. Ray, L. Barett, «Advanced Engineering Mathematics», Publ. McGraw-Hill, 2008.

3.I.S.Sokolnicof and R.M Redheffer, « Mathematics of Physics and Modern Engineering», Publ. McGraw-Hill.

4.E. Kreyszic, « Advance Engineering Mathematics sixth edition», Publ. John Willey and sons 1988.

5.J.A. Cochran, H.C. Wiser, B.J. Rice, « Advance Engineering Mathematics», Publ. Wadsworth 1972.

6.M.L. Boas, «Mathematical Methods in the Physical Sciences», Publ. John Willey and sons 1984.

7.R. Haberman, «Mathematical Models», Publ. Prentice Hall 1977. 

8.O’ Neil, «Advanced Engineering Mathematics», Publ. Wadsworth, 2005, Fourth Edition.

9.D. G. Duffy, «Advanced Engineering Mathematics», Publ. CRC Press, 2007.

10.K.A. Stroud, «Further Engineering Mathematics», Pub. Palgrave 1986. 

ELECTRONICS I

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Face to Face 
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 4

Laboratory, 2 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, students will have:

1.Knowledge of the properties of semiconductor silicon and germanium as the respective semiconductor doped n-type and p.

2.Knowledge of working principle, properties and applications of different diode types.

3.Knowledge of working principle, properties and applications of bipolar transistors.

4.Ability to apply that knowledge in the implementation of the alternating voltage rectifier circuits stabilizing voltage supply, protection of electronic circuits, low frequency amplifiers and circuits for controlling the current flow using electronic switches.

More specifically:

1.Be able to understand the operation of diodes and bipolar transistors.

2.Be able to select the appropriate types of diodes and transistors based on their characteristics and the specific application requirements.

3.Be able to carry out analyzes of electronic circuits consisting of diodes, bipolar transistors and passive components.

4.Be able to analyze, design and implement rectification circuits, smoothing and stabilizing the supply voltage.

5.Be able to analyze, design and implement low frequency signal amplification circuits.

6.Be able to analyze, design and implement circuits which require control current flow through electronic switch. 

Module Description

A. THEORY

The theory part of the course consists of the following modules:

1st Module:Introduction to Electronics: Semiconductor Physics - Structure data - Metals - Insulators - Semiconductors - Energy layers - Impurities, Donors / Aceptors - Type n semiconductors - Type p semiconductors.

 

 

Paper 5:.Photometry: Introduction to Photometry - Solid Angle - Luminous Flux - Point Sources - illuminance - light intensity.

2nd Module:The pn semiconductor: PN junction – Potential barrier / energy gap – Conduction mode – Cut-off - Equivalent circuits - Temperature dependency of base emitter voltage and reverse saturation current.

3rd Module:Rectifiers: Semi-rectification - Full rectification - Bridge rectifier - Smoothing of rectified voltage 

4th Module:Diode types: LED - Shcottky diodes – Varicap diode - Tunnel diode - Zener diode - Avalanche phenomena & zener - VI characteristic - Equivalent circuits - Zener voltage stabilization circuits – Clipping and clamper circuits.

5th Module:Bipolar transistors: NPN junctions – Working principle – Modes of operation – Current gain. DC bias - Load line – DC bias circuits - The bipolar transistor as a switch. The bipolar transistor as an amplifier - Common emitter amplifier configuration - Common collector amplifier configuration - Common base amplifier configuration.

 

B. LABORATORY

The Laboratory part of the course consists of the following separate modules:

1st Module:    Overview of key electronic components 

2nd Module:   Design and implementation of electronic circuits

3rd Module:    Multimeters description and voltage, current and resistance measurements

4th Module:    Basic circuits resistors – capacitors

5th Module:    Using the oscilloscope and signal display 

6th Module:    Diodes, LED diodes, ZENER diode, properties and applications

7th Module:    Transformer design characteristics, properties

8th Module:    Semi-rectification 

9th Module:    Bridge rectifier (with 4 diodes)

10th Module:  Smoothing of rectified voltage 

11th Module:  Stabilization series stabilizers & ZENER diode

12η Module:  Design and construction of symmetric DC power supply 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Evaluation Language : Greek

Theory

Final Written Exams: 100%

Laboratory

Final Written Exams: 60%

Individual project/paper: 40%

 

The grade of the course is estimated as:

 

60% x Theory + 40% x Laboratory grades

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Κ  Α. Κaribaka (2004). General electronics - Vol A. Athens  (in Greek)

2.Sedra, Smith (2014). Microelectronic Circuits, 7th edition. Oxford university press, USA

3.Jaeger  R.C.,  Blalock T.N. (2015). Microelectronics, 5th edition. Mc Grow Hill 

DIGITAL DESIGN

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures and exercises, face-to-face 
Weekly Hours:

Laboratory, 2

Lectures, 3 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

 

The introductory course on Digital Systems in designed for students with interest in the development, use and assessment of digital electronics or digital (electronic) circuits, which are electronics that handle digital signals.

The course syllabus aims to introduce the student to combinatorial and synchronous sequential logic circuits and to a first understanding of registers and memories, so as for him to form a solid base of understanding to the world of microcontrollers.

 

The aim of this course is the development of skills to analyze and design digital logic circuits.

 

On course completion the student should be able to:

-Use Boole’s algebra, numeral systems, pseudorandom numbers, binary codes and logic gates

-Develop and control systems using families of logic gates, combinatorial logic, flip-flops, f-memories, logic adders, registers, counters.

-Create circuits with digital logic comparators, multiplexers and de-multiplexers, as well as shifters, latches, simplify logic equations (Karnaugh, Quine-McCluskey etc.)

-Design and develop digital circuits and applications of digital design.

Module Description

 

-1st week:  numeral systems, pseudorandom numbers

-2nd week: binary codes and logic gates

-3rd week: Boole’s algebra

-4th week: logic equations (Karnaugh, Quine-McCluskey etc.)

-5th week: Full Adders/ Half adders

-6th week: multiplexers and de-multiplexers

-7th week: sequential logic circuits

-8th week: , latches, flip-flops

-9th week: synchronous sequential logic circuits

-10th week: Registers

-11th week : Shifters

-12th week: Create circuits with digital logic comparators

-13th week: Memories 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Language of Evaluation: Greek and English for students  Erasmus.

 

Theory

 

Written final examination (GE) (60%) that it includes:

-  Questions of short answer- Exercises of theory

 

Laboratory

 

Laboratory examination of  (40%) that it includes:

- Weekly laboratory  work 

- Final Examination 

The laboratory part is evaluated in the last lab session with 50% weight on a written exam and 50% on practical assessment

 

The laboratory part is evaluated in the last lab session with 50% weight on a written exam and 50% on practical assessment.

Recommended or required Bibliography

Recommended Book and Journal Article Resources:

 

Basic Manual:

 

1.Malvino Leach, 2006. Digital Electronics,  5 th Publication, ISBN: 960-8129-16-8 

2.Roumeliotis M., Sourvalas S., I., 2013 Digital Design, Tsiolas Publication ISBΝ: 978- 960-418- 388 -3 (in Greek) 

 

Books in the English language:

1.Morris Mano,  2007. Digital Design , ISBN: 960-7182-01-4

 

Related Science Magazines:

IEEE Transactions on Computer-Aided Design of Integrated Circuits and Systems

IEEEE Computers & Digital Techniques

ENGLISH TERMINOLOGY

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures and exercises, face-to-face
Weekly Hours: Lectures, 2 
ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course students will be able to:

•Understand scientific texts relative to the field of Electrical Engineering, either globally (global understanding) or thoroughly (scanning-thorough comprehension)

•Acquire the terminology and syntax of scientific texts through various methods and techniques

•Analyze the structure and organization elements of scientific speech on multiple levels (sentence, paragraph, text)

•Produce oral speech and construct written speech of multiple forms (instructions, description of components, functions and processes, essay writing, reports, professional mail etc.)

Specifically, students will be able to:

•Acquire and use technical vocabulary, terminology and structure connected to the field of Electrical Engineering 

•Extract specific information from texts about components, devices, structures, and processes

•Identify devices, components, structures, processes and explain their function

•Understand the structure and function of devices and components

•Recognize differences between types of devices and components

•Understand the relation between structures, components and processes

•Understand the features and technical specifications of different components and devices

•Describe devices, components, structures, and processes

• Discriminate between different types of processes 

Module Description

Theory

The core modules of the course include:

•The structure of Matter – Electric Charge

•Electric current, Potential Difference, and Electromotive Force

•Electric Energy and Power

•Resistance and Resistors / Conductors, Semiconductors, and Insulators / Capacitors and Capacitance

•Electromagnetism and Electromagnetic Induction

•Direct-current Circuits

•Alternating current and Voltage

•Electrical Measurements / Electrical Measuring Equipment

•Circuit-protective Equipment

•Dc Machines / Ac Machines

•Power Transmission and Distribution

•Transformers

•Control Systems

•Illumination 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final written examination: 80%

Individual project/paper : up to 20%, added to total score  

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.English for Electrical Engineering, Tsatsaros P., Diros editions 

2.English for Electrical Engineers, J. MacAllister – G. Madama

3.Authentic reading texts 

COMPUTER PROGRAMMING II

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures, laboratories   
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 2

Laboratory, 2 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, students will have:

 

1. In-depth knowledge and understanding of the basic concepts and principles of  programming in graphical environment

 

2. Experimental knowledge and skills to develop programming application in graphical environment.

 

3. Knowledge and synthesis skills for the design and development of computer  programs using the Visual Basic Computer language 

Module Description

1. Evolution of the User Interface, Programming Languages, Basic features of graphical user Interface, Basic features of programming languages for development in graphical environment.

2. Basic concepts of object oriented programming. Data types, Variables, Constants, Assignments statements and Calculations. Basic controls, Text box, Command button. 

3. Comparisons and Decisions, Comparison operators, Logical Operators, Nested comparison statements, Scroll bars controls. 

4. Introduction to Loops, Event driven, determinate, indeterminate, Nested loops, Variables Scope, Repetition statements, List box, Combo box. 

5. Control arrays, Check box, Option button, Frame control. 

6. Processing with Arrays, one and two dimensional arrays, Lists and Arrays, Multiple Lists.

7. Files, Programmer-Defined Types, Direct Access Files and Object Classes. 

8. Multiple Forms and General Procedures, Debugging loops.  

9.  Functions, Subs and Modules. Procedure scope. Global declarations and the Code Module. 

10. Menus and mouse events. Transformation of a button’s application to a menu application.

11. Data Base concepts, The Data Control, The object RecordSet, Navigation in a data base, Using SQL queries.

12. Using Visual Basic to Create Graphics.  

13. Web applications and Visual Basic.  

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Evaluation Language: Greek

English for Erasmus students

 

Theory: Final written exam: 100%

Laboratory: Lab Assignment 100%

 

The grade of the course is 60% x Theory +40% x Laboratory grades 

Recommended or required Bibliography

1. C. Angeli,  2000, Programming with Visual Basic,  Synchroni Ekdotiki, Athens. (in Greek).

2. T. P. McKeown, 2000, Learning to program with Visual Basic, John   Wiley & Sons, Inc, London.

3.  Web based bibliography. 

4. Teaching notes.

4th Semester

AUTOMATIC CONTROL SYSTEMS I

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures  
Weekly Hours: Lectures, 3 
ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, students will have:

1.Knowledge of the operating principles and the individual parts of which comprised an automatic control system.

2.Knowledge of the basic components of a basic control system.

3.Ability to design an automatic control system.

4.Knowledge of the fundamental principles of modeling of the individual components of a control system.

5.Knowledge of stability criteria.

6.Knowledge of the basic motion and power transmission systems.

 

More specifically:

1.Be able to understand the operation and detect errors and faults in automatic control system.

2.Have knowledge of the operating and safety testing of an automatic control system.

3.Be able to design the individual parts of control system. 

4.Be able to calculate and choose the individual units of a control system . 

Module Description

THEORY

The theory part of the course consists of the following modules:

1st Module:Introduction-Basic principles  

2nd Module:Physical systems analysis

3rd Module:Fundamental principles of modeling and design

4th Module:Transfer functions

5th Module:Closed-loop systems  

6th Module:Time response analysis

7th Module:Transient response analysis 

8th Module:Stability ctriteria 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Evaluation Language : Greek

Final Written Exams: 100% 

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.J.J.D’Azzo, C.H.Houpis. ’Linear Control System Analysis and Design’, Mc Graw-Hill, 4th Edition, 1995

2.R.C.Dorf. ‘Modern Control Systems’, Addison-Wesley, 3rd Edition, 1983

3.B.C.Kuo. ‘Automatic Control Systems’, Prentice-Hall, 5th Edition, 1987

4.O.I.Elgerd. ‘Control Systems Theory’, Mc Graw-Hill, 1967

5.R.N.Bateson. ‘Introduction to Control System Technology’, Prenice-Hall, 5th Edition, 1996

6.K.Dutton, S.Thompson, B. Barraclough. ‘The Art of Control Engineering’, Addison-Wesley, 1997

7.K. Ogata. ‘Modern Control Engineering’, Prentice-Hall, 2d Edition, 1995

8.M. Gopal. ‘Modern Control System Theory’, Willey Eastern’ 2nd Edition, 1993

9.S.M.Shinners. ‘Modern Control System Theory and Application’, Addison-Wesley, 2nd Edition, 1973

10.C.D.Johnson. ‘Process Control Instrumentation Technology’, Prentice- Hall, 6th Edition, 1997

11.R. Gayakwad, L. Sokoloff. ‘Analog and Digital Control Systems’, Prentice-Hall, New Jersey, 1988

12.A.C.McDonald, H.Lowe. ’Feedback and Control Systems’, Reston, 1981

13.Electro-Craft Corporation. ‘DC motors-Speed control-Servosystems’,    Pergamon, 1972

14.I.M.Gottlieb. ‘Electric motors and control techniques’, Mc Graw-Hill, 2nd Edition, 1994

15.IEE Control Engineering Series. ‘Stepping Motors’, 3rd Edition, 1992

16.W.R. Evans. ‘Control Systems Dynamics’ , Mc Graw-Hill, New York, 1954

17.M. Noton. ‘Modern Control Engineering’, Pergamon Press, New York, 1972

18.N.S.Nice.’ Control System Dynamics’, John Wiley & Sons, 4th Edition, USA, 2004

19.G. F. Fraklin, J. D. Powell, A. E. Naeimi, ’Feedback and Control Systems’, Pearson Prentice-Hall, 5th Edition, New Jersey, 2004

20.S. H. Zak. ‘ Systems and Control’, Oxford University Press, New York, 2003

21.K. Ogata. ‘ System Dynamics’, Pearson Prentice-Hall, 4th Edition, New Jersey, 2004

22.K. Dutton, S. Thomson, B. Barraclough. ‘The art of Control Engineering’, Addison Wesley Logman Limited, 2nd Edition, England, 1998

23.J. Wilkie, M. Johnson, R. Katebi. ’ Control Engineering’, Palgrave, New York, 2002

24.C. L. Phillips, R. D. Harbor, ‘Feedback Control Systems’ Prentice-Hall Inc., 4th Edition, New Jersey, 2002

25.N. S. Rau, ‘Optimization principles’, IEEE Press, 2003

26.P. L. Falb. ‘Optimal Control’, Mc Graw –Hill, 3d Edition, New York, 2007

27.D. E. Kerk. ‘ Oprimal Control Theory’, Dover Publications Inc., New York, 1998

28.R. F. Stengel. ‘Optimal Control and Estimation’, Dover Publication Inc., New York, 1994

29.A. Lacatelli. ’Oprimal Control’, Birkhauser’, Berlin, 2001

30.J. J. Distefano, A. R. Stubberud, I. J. Williams. ‘Συστήματα Αυτομάτου Ελέγχου’, Εκδόσεις Τζιόλα, Θεσσαλονίκη 2000

31.Τ. L. Vincent, W. J. Grantham. ‘Μη γραμμικά Συστήματα Αυτομάτου Ελέγχου και Βέλτιστος Έλεγχος’, Εκδόσεις Τζιόλα, Θεσσαλονίκη 2001

32.R. C. Dorf, R. H. Bishop. ‘Σύγχρονα Συστήματα Αυτομάτου Ελέγχου’, Εκδόσεις Τζιόλα, Θεσσαλονίκη 2003

33.Π.Ν. Παρασκευόπουλου. ‘Εισαγωγή στον Αυτόματο Έλεγχο’, Αθήνα 1991

34.Π.Ν. Παρασκευόλπουλου. ‘Λυμένες Ασκήσεις Συστημάτων Αυτομάτου Ελέγχου με Εφαρμογές’, Αθήνα 1993

35.Ν.Ι. Κρικέλη. ‘Εισαγωγή στον Αυτόματο Έλεγχο’, Αθήνα 1985

36.Ν.Ι. Κρικέλη. ‘Μοντελοποίηση και Βέλτιστος Έλεγχος Συστημάτων’, Αθήνα 1991  

37.T. Kουσιουρή. ‘Θεωρία Γραμμικών Πολυμεταβλητών Συστημάτων’, Αθήνα 1991

38.Δ. Καλλιγερόπουλου. ‘Συστήματα Αυτομάτου Ελέγχου’ Τόμος 1ος , Αθήνα 1991

39.Σ. Πακτίτη. ‘Συστήματα Αυτομάτου Ελέγχου’, Αθήνα 1979

40.Α.Β. Μαχιά. ‘Συστήματα Αυτομάτου Ελέγχου και Αναλογικοί Υπολογιστές’, Αθήνα 1991

41.Β. Πετρίδη. ‘Συστήματα Αυτομάτου Ελέγχου’, Τόμος 1ος , Θεσσαλονίκη 1986

42.Β. Πετρίδη. ‘Συστήματα Αυτομάτου Ελέγχου’, Τόμος 2ος , Θεσσαλονίκη 1986

43.Κ.Α. Καρύμπακα, Ε.Κ. Σερβετά. ‘Συστήματα Αυτομάτου Ελέγχου’, Τόμοι Α,Β και Γ, Αθήνα 1978

44.Ρ. Κινγκ. ‘Βιομηχανικός Έλεγχος’, Εκδόσεις Παπασωτηρίου, Αθήνα 1996 

45.Π.Χ. Βαφειάδη. ‘Μαθήματα Συστημάτων Ελέγχου’, Αθήνα 1983

46.Σ.Γ. Τζαφέστα. ‘Συστήματα Αυτομάτου Ελέγχου’, Εκδόσεις Παπασωτηρίου, Αθήνα 1978

47.Α.Ν. Βελώνη. ‘Συστήματα Αυτομάτου Ελέγχου -  Λυμένες Ασκήσεις’, Αθήνα 1997

48.Π.Β. Μαλατέστα, Σ.Ν. Μανιά. ‘Ηλεκτρική Κίνηση’, Εκδόσεις Τζιόλα, Θεσσαλονίκη 2001

49.Γ. Ε. Χατζαράκη. ‘Ηλεκτρικά Κυκλώματα’, Τόμος Α’, Εκδόσεις Τζιόλα, Θεσσαλονίκη 2002 

COMPUTER-AIDED ELECTRICAL DESIGN

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures, laboratories 
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 1

Laboratory Exercises, 2 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

This course provides participants with all the necessary skills and knowledge to design electrical installations. The ability to design is required before new installations are constructed and also when additions or alterations to existing installations are required. The course develops the knowledge and ability of the candidates to the required level of competence for them to sign the Electrical Installation Certificates required by ELOT HD 384.

On completion of the course, students will be able to

•read  schematic diagrams and electrical layout 

•design electrical installations, performing all necessary calculations

•verify that a design complies with the Regulations

Moreover, a student who successfully fulfils the course requirements will have demonstrated: 

•An ability to design an electrical installation to meet given specifications with realistic engineering constraints. 

•An ability to function as a member of an engineering design team. 

•An ability to utilize technical resources both from prior relevant coursework, as well as from sources students must seek out on their own (e.g., various technical literature, data sheets, etc.) 

•An ability to write technical documents and give oral presentations related to design project results

 

At the conclusion of this course, student should develop the following capabilities: 

•Ability to select appropriate modelling techniques for supporting semi-structured business decision making 

•Ability to identify and select appropriate decision support systems for generating innovative business solutions 

•Ability to design and implement decision support systems for generating innovative business solutions  

Module Description

•Need for Technical Drawing. 

•Classification of Drawings. 

•Principles of Drawing: Drawing Sheet, Scales, Lines, Lettering. 

•Orthographic Projections (Views). 

•Presentation of Views. 

•Designation and Relative Positions of Views. 

•Selection of Views. 

•Sectional Views: Full section, Half Section. Dimensioning. 

•Electrical designing. General meanings and knowledge. Regulations. Conductors, cables, tubes, interior electrical installations (IEI) switch boards.

•Electrical drawings and diagrams.

•Electrical schematic drawing.

•Electrical panel schedules.

•Electrical one line diagrams.

•Introduction to Computer Aided Drawing (CAD).

•Basics of AutoCAD.

•Getting comfortable with the AutoCAD Environment.

•Using AutoCAD to Design of Electrical Installations 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination: 60%

Laboratory exercise: 40%

Optional job preparation and presentation of up to 20%, less than the proportion of written examination 

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Α. Goutis “Design of Electrical Installations ”, Part A, Editions ION (in Greek) 

2.Α. Goutis “ Design of Electrical Installations ”, Part Β, Editions ION (in Greek)

3.A.V. Machias “Study and Design of Electrical Installations ”, 1985, Editions I. Simeon (in Greek)

4.Karatrasoglou I. “ Design of Electrical Installations ”, 1998, Editions ION (in Greek)

5.G. Kappos “Learn Autocad via Examples ”, Editions TZIOLA (in Greek)

6.Lectrurer Notes (in Greek) 

ELECTRICAL MACHINES I

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures and exercises, face-to-face 
Weekly Hours:

Laboratory, 2

Lectures, 4 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

 

Upon completion of the course, students will  be able to: 

1.Understand the basic concepts of magnetic circuits as applied to electric machines.

2.Understand the basic operation of a transformer.

3.Understand terminal markings and various single phase and three phase wiring schemes.

4.Understand the electrical testing methods performed on transformers such as insulation resistance testing, excitation and power factor testing.

 

5.Describe the critical parts of transformer specifications

6.Describe various transformer types and different methods of construction, application, and their advantages and disadvantages

7.Explain transformer protection fundamentals

8.Uunderstand three phase transformers and different types of three phase circuits and connections.

9.Understand basic motors and generators.

10.Describe the operation of DC machines

11.Explain construction and operation principle of dc motors and dc generators

12.Describe the working principle of a DC motor and a DC generator.

13.Describe the operation of, and factors affecting output and direction of current flow in DC generators.

14.Describe the operation of, and factors affecting output power, torque, speed and direction of rotation of DC motors.

15.Describe the difference between motors and state the use of series wound, shunt wound and compound DC motors.

16.Explain construction and operation principle of transformers

17.Describe methods of speed control and direction of rotation 

Module Description

1.Magnetic circuits

2.Conversion Energy 

3.Ferromagnetic materials

4.Fundamental principles for analysis of transformers and electrical machines

5.Transformers 

6.Single -  phase transformers 

7.Three - phase transformers 

8.Autotransformers

9.Configuration of single phase and three phase power transformers

10.Magnetic saturation and higher harmonic effects

11. DC Electric Machines 

12. Types of DC machines excited 

13. Dynamic analysis of DC Machines  

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Language of Evaluation: Greek and English for students  Erasmus.

Theory

Written final examination (GE) (60%) that it includes:

-  Questions of short answer- Exercises of theory

Laboratory

Laboratory examination of  (40%) that it includes:

- Weekly laboratory  work 

- Final Examination 

The laboratory part is evaluated in the last lab session with 50% weight on a written exam and 50% on practical assessment.

 

The laboratory part is evaluated in the last lab session with 50% weight on a written exam and 50% on practical assessment. 

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Malatestas P., (2012). Electric Machines , Tziolas Publications, Thessaloniki (in Greek) 

2.Safakas A., (2007). Electric Machines - Volume A, Publications  of  University of  Patras (in Greek) 

3.Chapman S. , (2009). Electric Machines , Tziolas Publication Thessaloniki (in Greek), 

4.Fitzgerald A. E.  , Kingsley C., Umans S., (2003). Electric machinery, McGraw-Hill, 

5.Cathey J. J., (2001). , Electric machines, McGraw-Hill, 

6.Hindmarsh J., (1995), Electrical machines and their applications, Elsevier 

POWER ELECTRONICS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures, laboratories , face to face  
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 4

Laboratory Exercises, 2 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:

1. Know the operating principles and the individual parts of which the electronic power circuit is comprised 

2.Acquire the Knowledge of safety and operational requirements of electrical systems, using semiconductors.

3.Design equipment using power electronic circuits.

4.Select the appropriate materials, adapted to the application’s requirements, based on their characteristics and their needs.

5.Know the operating principles of semiconductors arrangements and their operating characteristics, both theoretically and experimentally.

6.Find new solutions and technologies in order to achieve the maximum techno economic performance.

More specifically students will:

1.Be able to comprehend the operation of power circuits and detect errors and faults in similar arrangements.

2.Have knowledge of the operating and safety testing of relevant electrical equipments.

3.Be able to design electronic circuits according to the specific operating requirements.

4.Be able to calculate and select appropriate materials according to the load characteristics.

5.Be able to understand how the semiconductors are driven so as to construct devices with high efficiency. 

Module Description

A. THEORY

The theory part of the course consists of the following modules:

Session 1:  Introduction: Power Electronics Technology.

Session 2:  Circuit with Switches and Diodes: Circuits with DC source and AC loads, R-C, R-L, R-L-C, power diode, diode semi rectifiers with R-C loads, R-L, R-L-C.

Session 3:  Converters AC to DC: Introduction, Thyristors, Controlled semi rectifiers with loads  R, L, R-L

Session 4: Diodes Rectifier:  Common point, power quality, single phase full rectifier, multiphase rectifiers with common point, three phase full rectifiers.

Session 5: Thyristor Converters: Single phase controlled rectifier, Three-phase controlled rectifier.

Session 6 : Inverters: Introduction, single phase  inverter, three phase inverts.

 Session 7: Switch Mode Converters ( dc to dc) : Introduction,  boost converter,  buck converters, buck boost converter .

Session 8 : Regulators (AC to AC ): Introduction,  Operation with load R, R-L, single  and three-phase regulator.

Section 9: Switching Power Semiconductors: Introduction, , MOSFET, IGBT, GTO, SiC

 

B. LABORATORY 

Consists of the following separate units:

Session 1: Presentation of the lab’s regulations and habituation with the lab’s equipments

Session 2: Study of Electrical Characteristics (V-I) semiconductor diodes, thyristors.

Session 3: Single-phase non-controlled rectifier half wave loads with R, R-L

Session 4: Single-phase non -controlled bridge with loads R, R-L

Session 5: Fully controlled single-phase bridge with loads R, R-L

Section 6: Three-phase fully controlled bridge

Session 7 : Single phase converters AC / AC (TRIAC) 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Theory :(60%)

Final Written Examination: 60% of the written exam grade.

  

Laboratory: (40%)

•Weekly laboratory work-exercise (30% of 40% of the laboratory final exam grade )

•Weekly oral examination (30% of 40% of the laboratory final exam grade)

•Final Written Examination ( 40% of 40% of the laboratory final exam grade ) 

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.S.MANIAS,2014, ΄Power electronics΄, Simeon’s  publishments,  4th  edition , Athens (In Greek)

2.P.Malatestas, I. Villioths, 2004, Laboratory exercises for Power Electronics ΄, Tziola’s publishments,Athens ( In Greek )

3.M. Mayer,1996 ΄Leistungs elektronik΄ , Spriger Verlag .

4.Mohan N. , Unterland T , Robbins W, 2006,΄ Power Electronics΄, John Wiley & Sons .

5.Kield Thordorg,2002, ΄ Power Electronics΄,  Prentice – Hall.

6.Rashid Mohamadh,2005, ΄ Power Electronics΄,  Prentice – Hall.

7.S. Maniktala,2004, “Switching Power Supply Design & Optimization”, McGraw-Hill.

8. K. Billings,1999,“Switchmode Power Supply Handbook”, McGraw-Hill Professional.

9. W. Shepherd, L. N. Hulley, D. T. W. Liang,1996,“Power Electronics and Motor Control”, Cambridge University Press.

10. E. Acha, V. Agelidis, O. Anaya, T. J. E. Miller,2002,“Power Electronic Control in Electrical Systems”, Newnes.

11. J. Hindmarsh,1985 “Electrical Machines and Drives Worked Examples”, Pergamon Press.

12. IEEE Transactions on Power Electronics, paper selection.

13. IEEE Transactions on Industry Applications, paper selection.

14. IEEE Transactions on Industrial Electronics, paper selection. 

ELECTRONICS II

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Face to face  
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 2

Exercises, 1

Laboratory, 2

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, students will have:

1.Knowledge of working principle, properties and applications of unipolar transistor (JFET-MOSFET).

2.Knowledge of working principle, properties and applications of operational amplifiers.

3.Ability to apply knowledge about unipolar transistor in the analysis, design and implementation of low frequency amplification circuits and  power flow control circuits via electronic switch.

4.Ability to apply knowledge about operational amplifiers in the analysis, design and implementation of circuits for amplification and general signal processing.

More specifically:

1.Be able to understand how unipolar transistors operate.

2.Be able to understand the functional characteristics of unipolar transistors in order  to choose the appropriate commercial types based on their characteristics and the specific application requirements.

3.Be able to carry out analyses of electronic circuits consisting of diodes, bipolar and unipolar transistors and passive components.

4.Be able to design and carry out signal amplification circuits for dc and low frequencies.

5.Be able to design and implement circuits which require control of current flow via electronic switch.

6.Be able to analyze, design and implement electronic circuits to achieve automation  circuits (comparison circuits, PID controllers, etc.) using operational amplifiers. 

Module Description

A. THEORY

The theory part of the course consists of the following modules:

1st Module:Unipolar transistor: The n channel  - The p channel - Working principle – Modes of operation - JFET transconductance - Drain current versus  drain to source voltage characteristics.

2nd Module:Unipolar transistors: DC bias - Load line - JFET bias circuits.

3rd Module:Unipolar transistor: JFET as a switch - JFET as an amplifier - JFET ac low frequency equivalent circuit - Common source amplifier configuration - Common gate amplifier configuration - Common drain amplifier configuration.

4th Module:Unipolar transistors: MOSFET working principle – Modes of operation - Depletion MOSFET - Enhancement MOSFET - DC bias - Load line- MOSFET bias circuits – MOSFET ac low frequency equivalent circuit.

5th Module:Operational Amplifiers (OpAmps): Differential amplifier - Ideal operational amplifier - ideal Properties of OpAmp- Real OpAmp - Characteristics and properties of OpAmp - OpAmp compensation and frequency response.

6th Module:Operational Amplifiers (OpAmps): OpAmp as a dc amplifier - Negative feedback in OpAmps - Inverting configuration of OpAmps - Non inverting configuaration of OpAmps – The OpAmp as a comparator - Hysteresis comparator (Schmitt trigger).

7th Module:Operational Amplifiers (OpAmps): Summing amplifier – Inverting integration - Inverting differentiator – Ideal rectification - Current source with "floating load" - Current source with "earthed load”.

 

B. LABORATORY

The Laboratory part of the course consists of the following separate modules:

1st Module:     RELAY - applications 

2nd Module:    The bipolar transistor - Characteristics, how to recognize and measure with electronic multimeter

3rd Module:    The bipolar transistor as a switch 

4th Module:    Common emitter amplifier configuration

5th Module:    Common collector amplifier configuration

6th Module:    Operational Amplifiers.  Characteristics,  properties and applications

7th Module:    Inverting configuration of Operational Amplifiers  

8th Module:    Non inverting configuration of Operational Amplifiers  

9th Module:    555  timer in monostable mode

10th Module:  555  timer in unstable mode

11th Module:  Mosfet - applications 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Evaluation Language : Greek

Theory

Final Written Exams: 100%

Laboratory

Final Written Exams: 60%

Individual project/paper: 40%

 

The grade of the course is estimated as:

 

60% x Theory + 40% x Laboratory grades 

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Κaribaka Κ.Α (2004). General electronics - Vol A. Athens  (in Greek)

2.Sedra, Smith (2014). Microelectronic Circuits, 7th edition. Oxford university press, USA

3.Jaeger  R.C.,  Blalock T.N. (2015). Microelectronics, 5th edition. Mc Grow Hill

4.Charitani  J (2008). Analog Electronics, Arakinthos publications  (in Greek) 

ELECTRICAL MEASUREMENTS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures, laboratories , distance learning methods  
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 3

Laboratory, 2 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The course is targeting to introduce the students theoretically and practically to measurement procedures in order to estimate the real value of electrical and non-electrical quantities. Upon completion of the course, students will have:

1.In-depth knowledge and understanding of the International System of units and the electrical quantities measuring standards, and can successfully convert magnitudes of measured quantities in different unit systems.

2.Understanding of the important role that the correct and accurate measurements have in every human activity.

3.Understanding the errors in every measurement, and perform error analysis, following the international standards

4.In-depth knowledge and understanding of the characteristics of the measuring instruments and ability to choose the most suitable instrument to perform the required measurement.

5.Ability to conduct measurements and use the applied standards to calculate the error and uncertainty of the measurements in order to present the value.

6.Ability to design / select measuring devices and to determine the error associated with this, in order to measure the necessary electrical quantities, even when the instruments scales are not that small or large.

7.Ability to use oscilloscopes even without manual.

8.Ability to measure power and energy in electrical installations and apparartus. 

Module Description

A. THEORY

The theory part of the course consists of the following modules:

1st Module:Measuring Units’ Systems: Historically data on measuring units. Units of Measuring Systems. In the International System of Units (S.I.). Modern Measuring Units and Standards. International Bureau of Weights and Measures.

2nd Module:Error Analysis: Errors in Measurements. Classification, analysis, determination. Statistical processing in measurements. Statistical Distributions. Errors in direct and indirect measurements. Uncertainties type A and type B. International standard defining uncertainty GUM.

3rd Module:Instruments and measuring devices: Static and dynamic characteristics of instruments. Mathematical models of measuring devices. Analog and digital instruments. General concepts and descriptions. Analysis of the main types of analogue and electronic instruments.

4th Module:Basic measuring devices: Ideal and real capacitor. Ideal and real coil. Measurements using ammeter - voltmeter circuits. Voltage divider, resistive, capacitive and mixed. Instruments’ transformers, current and voltage measurements using transformers.

5th Module:Balancing Methods – Measuring Bridges: DC and AC Bridges. Wheatstone, Kelvin, Sauty - Wien, Schering, Wien - Robinson, Maxwell, Hay, Heaviside Bridges.

6th Module:Oscilloscopes: Basics of oscilloscope. Oscilloscope functions. Analog oscilloscopes. Digital Storage Oscilloscopes. Digital Phosphor oscilloscopes. Digital Oscilloscopes Mixed Signal - Joint Field. Digital Sampling Oscilloscopes. Sampling methods. Oscilloscope terminology. Operations - Functions - Settings of oscilloscopes. Measurement Techniques.

7th Module:Measuring Power and energy: Energy and Power. Power measurement in DC - DC circuits. Measuring power in AC - AC circuits. Measuring power in three-phase and multi-phase circuits. Electronic power meters. Electrical energy measurement systems.

 

B. LABORATORY

The Laboratory part of the course consists of the following separate modules:

1st Module:Resistance measurement with comparative methods

2nd Module:Resistance measurement with voltmeter and ammeter

3rd Module:Extended measuring range voltmeter

4th Module:Wheatstone Bridge

5th Module:Measurement of coil inductance and capacitor capacity

6th Module:Potential - Earth resistance measurement

7th Module:E.M.F. measurement

8th Module:MURRAY method

9th Module:Oscilloscope operation

10th ModuleMeasuring transformers

11th Module:Kelvin method

12th Module:Sensitivity analysis in circuits 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Evaluation Language : Greek

Theory

Final Written Exams: 100%

Laboratory

weekly individual written exam

weekly group technical reports

written final exam 

practical final examination 

 

The grade of the course is 

60% x Theory + 40% x Laboratory grades 

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Psomopoulos C.S., (2013), Electrical Measurements, Tsotras Publ, Athens,  in Greek.

2.Mathioulakis Μ.Ε., (2004), Measurement, Measurement Quality and Uncertainty, Hellenic Labs Association, Athens, in Greek

3.Fridman A.E., (2012), The Quality of Measurements: A Metrological Reference,  Springer Science+Business Media, New York

4.Fornasini P., (2008), The Uncertainty in Physical Measurements: An Introduction to Data Analysis in the Physics Laboratory, Springer Science+Business Media, New York

5.Gertsbakh I., (2003), Measurement Theory for Engineers, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg GmbH, New York

6.Rabinovich S.G., (2013), Evaluating Measurement Accuracy: A Practical Approach, Springer Science+Business Media, New York

7.Gasteratos Α., Mouroutsos S.G., Andreadis Ι., (2013), Measuring Technology – Sensors, Tsotras Publ, Athens, in Greek

8.Theodorou Ν., (2004), Electrical Measurements, Part Ι: Classical Measurements, Symmetry Publ., Athens, in Greek.

9.ΑΒΒ, (2011), Made to measure. Practical guide to electrical measurements in low voltage switchboards, ΑΒΒ, Sweden

10.ISO, (1995), Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement. 2nd ed., Geneva 

11.Internet References (updated in a year basis)

12.Laboratory and lecture notes  

5th Semester

AUTOMATIC CONTROL SYSTEMS II

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:

Lectures 

Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 3

Laboratory, 2 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, students will have:

1.Knowledge of the basic principles of the state-space representation of an automatic control system.

2.Knowledge of the of the state-space representation techniques of an automatic control system.

3.Ability to design systems in state-space.

4.Knowledge of the state-space modeling techniques.

5.Knowledge of the state-space stability criteria.

6.Knowledge of the basic motion and power transmission systems.

 

More specifically:

1.Be able to understand the operation and detect errors and faults in automatic control system.

2.Have knowledge of the operating and safety testing of an automatic control system.

3.Be able to design the individual parts of control system. 

4.Be able to calculate and choose the individual units of a control system . 

Module Description

A. THEORY

The theory part of the course consists of the following modules:

1st Module:State-space  representation and analysis

2nd Module:Canonical forms

3rd Module:Controllability and Observability

4th Module:Lyapunov stability methods

5th Module:Pole-placement design by state feedback techniques  

6th Module:Time response analysis

7th Module:Transient response analysis 

8th Module:Stability ctriteria

A. LABORATORY

The Laboratory part of the course consists of the following separate modules:

1st Module:Information and Familiarization with the Lab and Equipment - Lab Regulations

2nd Module:PID-Controllers

3rd Module:Fluid level control

4th Module:Temperature control  

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Evaluation Language : Greek

Theory

Final Written Exams: 100%

Laboratory

Final Written Exams: 60%

Individual project/paper: 40%

 

The grade of the course is estimated as:

 

60% x Theory + 40% x Laboratory grades 

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.D’Azzo J, Houpis C (1995). Linear Control System Analysis and design. Mc Graw-Hill publications, USA

2.Kuo  B (1987). Automatic Control Systems.  Prentice-Hall publications, USA

3.Elgerd  O (1967). Control Systems Theory. Mc Graw-Hill publications, USA

4.Ogata K (1995). Modern Control Engineering. Prentice-Hall publications, USA

5.Ogata K (2004). System dynamics. Prentice-Hall publications, USA

6.Dorf R, Bishop R (2003). Modern Automatic Control Systems, Tziolas publications, Thessaloniki (in Greek)

7.Malatestas P. (2014). Automatic Control Systems Theory, Tziolas publications, Thessaloniki (in Greek)

8.Malatestas P. (2013). Automatic Control Systems Solved Problems, Tziolas publications, Thessaloniki (in Greek) 

ELECTRICAL MACHINES II

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures and exercises, face-to-face 
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 5

Exercises, 1

Laboratory, 2 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, students will have:

1.Understand and mastery of the basic concepts of the general laws of mechanics, fields, waves, electromagnetism, and their application towards solving engineering problems.

2.Knowledge and use of the principles of circuit theory and electrical machines.

3.Ability to calculate and design electrical machines.

4.Knowledge of machine control and electrical drives and their applications.

 

More specifically:

1.Be able to understand the operation of electrical machines.

2.Be able to select the appropriate types of electric  machines based on their characteristics and the specific application requirements.

3.Have knowledge of the operating and safety testing of electric  machines

4.Be able to understand the mathematical models and circuit models and how to determine corresponding parameters. 

5.Be able to select the applications and how the machines are used. 

Module Description

 

A. THEORY

The theory part of the course consists of the following modules:

 

1st Module:  Key parts of AC electrical machines, Categories of AC rotating machines,  

                        Windings of electrical machines. Operation in all four quadrants. Rotating 

                        magnetic field. Development of tension and torque.

2nd Module:  Asynchronous three-phase motor. Operating Principle. Equivalent single-phase

                        circuit. Flow of power and degree of Performance

3rd Module:  Asynchronous three-phase motor. State equations. Torque-speed curve. 

                        Simplified formula of Kloss. Maximum output power.

4th Module:  Asynchronous three-phase motor. Identifying parameters of the equivalent 

                        circuit. Separation of mechanical losses and core losses.

5th Module:  Asynchronous three-phase motor. Normalized curves. Effect of varying the 

                        voltage power to the torque-speed curve.

6th Module:  Asynchronous three-phase motor. Effect of Varying frequency to the torque-

                        speed curve. Time of acceleration. Asynchronous three-phase double cage 

                        motor.

7th Module:  Asynchronous three-phase motor. Start Methods. Methods of braking 

                        asynchronous three-phase motors. Operation of three-phase motor as a single 

                        phase one.

8th Module:  Asynchronous single-phase motor. Theory of two rotating fields. Equivalent 

                        circuit. Torque - Power. Calculation of equivalent circuit constants

9th Module:  Asynchronous single-phase motor. Start Methods of single phase motors. 

                        Shaded pole motors.

10th Module:  Synchronous generator construction. The equivalent circuit of a Synchronous 

                          generator. Power and Torque in Synchronous generator. Measuring 

                          Synchronous generator model parameters. Parallel operation of AC 

                          generators.

11th Module:  Synchronous motor. Basic principles of motor operation. Steady-state 

                          Synchronous motor operation. Starting Synchronous motors.

 

B. LABORATORY

The Laboratory part of the course consists of the following separate modules:

 

1st Module:     Information and familiarization with the lab and its equipment - laboratory 

                         Regulation

2nd Module:Determination of the equivalent circuit parameters of asynchronous machine

3rd Module:Starting Methods of three-phase asynchronous motors

4th Module:Starting Methods Single-phase asynchronous motor

5th Module:No-load curve of synchronous generator

6th Module:Short circuit curve of synchronous generator

7th Module:Charging curve of synchronous generator

8th Module:Parallelism of synchronous generator with the electrical network

9th Module:Synchronous motor 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Evaluation Language : Greek

 

Theory

Final Written Exams: 100%

 

Laboratory

Final Written Exams:: 70%

Team laboratory exercise report : 30%

 

The grade of the course is

60% x Theory + 40% x Laboratory grades  

Recommended or required Bibliography

[1].  Fitzerald A., Kingsley C., Umans S. (1983). Electric Machinery.  Mc Graw-Hill. 4th

        Edition.

[2].  Zorbas D. (1989). Electric Machine. West Publishing Company. 1st  Edition.

[3].  Malatestas P. (2013). Electric Machines.  Tziolas Publication. (In Greek ) 

LIGHTING TECHNOLOGY

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:

Lectures, laboratories , distance learning methods 

Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 2

Exercises, 1

Laboratory, 2 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, students will have:

1.In-depth knowledge and critical understanding of concepts, sizes and Laws of Photometry.

2.Know the different light bulbs technologies.

3.Ability to apply that knowledge in the implementation of interior and exterior lighting projects.

More specifically:

1.Be able to understand the features sizes of light sources-lighting.

2.Be able to choose appropriate lighting lamps depending on the application and specific operating conditions.

3.Be able to conduct internal lighting projects with approximate-empirical methods.

4.Be able to conduct internal lighting projects using special lighting programs in accordance with applicable European standards.

5.Be able to conduct outdoor lighting studies with approximate-empirical methods.

1.6. Be able to conduct outdoor lighting studies using special lighting programs in accordance with applicable European standards. 

Module Description

A. THEORY

The theory part of the course consists of the following modules:

1st Module:Photometry: Introduction to Photometry - Solid Angle - Luminous Flux - Point Sources - illuminance - light intensity.

2nd Module:Photometry: Inverse-Square Law - Law of Cosine - Law of Lambert - Lampertianes Surfaces - Inverse-Square Law for non-point Sources - Reflection, Transmission, Absorption.

3rd Module:Internal Lighting Design: Introduction to Interior lighting - Favie-Oikonomopoulos method

4th Module:Internal Lighting Design: Zonal Cavity Method

5th Module:Internal Lighting Design: Method according to standard EN12464.

6th Module:Interior Glare: Luminance Curves System - Glare System limitation according to CIE - Glare limitation according  to Unified Glare Rating System (UGR)

7th Module:Road Lighting: Introduction to Road Lighting - Road Lighting methods - Road Luminaries Characteristics - Road Luminaries Arrangements.

8th Module:Road Lighting: Method of average illuminance or Lumen Method.

9th Module:Road Lighting: Basic Luminance method - Road lighting categories according to CEN 13201.

 

B. LABORATORY

The Laboratory part of the course consists of the following separate modules:

1st Module:Lamp Characteristic Quantities - Basic Photometric Quantities

2nd Module:Luminaries Polar Diagram Drawing

3rd Module:Ulbricht Integration Sphere

4th Module:Study of the incandescent lamp characteristics

5th Module:Study of the fluorescent lamp characteristics

6th Module:Study of the mercury lamp (Hg) characteristics

7th Module:Study of the mercury lamp (Hg) characteristics

8th Module:Study of the metal halide lamp characteristics

9th Module:Study of the low pressure sodium lamp (Na) characteristics

10th ModuleRousseau Diagrams

11th Module:Isolux Diagrams

12th Module:Utilization and Learning of a Lighting Software 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Evaluation Language : Greek

Theory

Final Written Exams: 100%

Laboratory

Final Written Exams: 60%

Individual project/paper: 40%

 

The grade of the course is estimated as:

 

60% x Theory + 40% x Laboratory grades 

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Tsakiris A (2004). Lighting technology. Αθήνα (in Greek)

2.Topalis F, Oikonomou L  (2010). Lighting technology. Tziolas publications, Thessaloniki (in Greek)

3.Philips (1993). LIGHTING MANUAL, 5th edition 

RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES I

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures, laboratories , distance learning methods  
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 4

Laboratory exercises, 2 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The objective of the lesson is to familiarize the student with the utilization methods of the renewable energy resources, which are existing in the natural world, so that the student will able to assess the related procedures in terms of technical, financial and social, in the context of training as an Electrical Engineer of highest Technological Education.

 

Upon completion of the course, students will have:

1.Ability to recognize the need of renewable energy technologies and their role in the Greece and world energy demand.

2.Ability to distinguish between the sustainable energy sources and fossil energy sources with emphasis on wind and photovoltaic systems.

3.Knowledge of the operating principles of renewable energy production from various renewable sources, especially 

4.Knowledge of security and operational requirements of autonomous and net connected renewable energy systems.

5.Ability to design simple small autonomous photovoltaic and wind energy systems.

6.Knowledge of operating principles of geothermal heat pumps.

7.Ability to compare the advantages and disadvantages of various renewable energy technologies and propose the best possible energy conversion system for a particular location.

More specifically:

1.Be able give some basic definitions (power curve, Betz limit, stall and pitch regulation, I_V characteristics etc.)

2.Be able to understand basic concepts such as power production, efficiency, energy yield of various renewable energy systems for a specific site.

3.Be able to describe the main design concepts, main differences, advantages of various renewable energy systems

4.Be able to describe operation of hybrid systems (wind/diesel, wind/photovoltaic/diesel etc)

5.Be able to describe effects various renewable energy systems has on environment.

6.Be able to describe different economical support schemes for renewable energy systems 

Module Description

A. THEORY

The theory part of the course consists of the following modules:

 

1st Module:    Photovolatics: Introduction to solar energy, solar geometry, photovoltaic effect, photovoltaic generators technologies, photovoltaic  systems – autonomous/interconnected.

2nd Module:   Solar thermal applications: Solar thermal power systems (household, centralized), energy generating systems, thermal energy storage.

3rd Module:Wind Turbines: Introduction to wind energy, wind characteristics, wind energy potential, types of wind turbines, wind farms.

4th Module:Geothermal Energy: Introduction to geothermal energy, geothermal fields, space heating, electricity generation, shallow geothermal energy systems

5th Module:Biomass: Introduction to biomass, biomass potential, exploitation possibility, cogeneration.

6th Module:Hydropower: Introduction to hydropower, small hydropower systems, system resources, hydroelectric power plants technologies.

7th Module:Legislation – Licensing: Current RES installations legislation and licensing in Greece, pricing policy

 

 

B. LABORATORY

The Laboratory part of the course consists of the following separate modules:

 

1st Module:Information and Familiarization with the Lab and Equipment - Lab Regulations

2nd Module:Study of the electrical characteristics (V-I) of Photovoltaic Generator System

3rd Module:Dimensioning of an autonomous Photovoltaic Power Generator System

4th Module:Procession and assessment of Photovoltaic Generator System’ data

5th Module:Study of a Wind Generator Power System and its annual energy

6th Module:Study of a Hydroelectric Power Generator system and its annual energy

7th Module:Study of a Solar Energy Generating System and its annual energy

8th Module:Study of a Geothermal Energy Power System and its annual energy

9th Module:Study of a Biomass Energy Power System and its annual energy 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Evaluation Language : Greek

English for Erasmus students

 

Theory

Final Written Exams: 100%

 

Laboratory

Final Written Exams:: 70%

Team laboratory exercise report : 30%

 

The grade of the course is 

60% x Theory + 40% x Laboratory grades  

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Balarás K , Argyríou A , Karagiánnis F, 2006. Conventional and Renewable Energy Sources, Tekdotiki Publications. 1st edition , ISBN: 960-8257-23-9, Athens.

2.Bizionis B., Bizionis D., Alternative Energy Sources , 2014 ,Tziolas Publications , 2nd edition, ISBN: 978-960-418-309-8, Thessaloniki .

3.Kaldellis John. K. Kavadias Kosmas A . ,2001. Laboratory renewable forms of energy. STAMOULI Publishing Inc.ISBN: 960-351-345-8, Athens .

4.Charonis Panagiotis.1988. Passive Solar Greenhouses. Ion Publications. 1st edition. ISBN: 960-405-062-1,Athens .

5.Socrates Kaplanis , 2004. Renewable Energy Sources I , II , III , Ion Publications , 1st edition , ISBN: 960-411-429-8, 960-411-430-1, 960-411-431- X, Athens.

6.Asimakopoulos D ,. Arabatzis G. Aggelis - Dimakis A . , Kartalidis A . , Tsiligiridis C ., 2015. Renewable Energy - Resources and Technologies  Sofia Pubications, 1st edition , ISBN: 978-960-6706-76- 9 Thessaloniki.

7.Fragiadakis . Photovoltaic Systems. Ziti Publicatios.

8.Neocleous , A. , Konstantinidis. 2003. Photovoltaic systems, Ion Publications .

9.Golding, W. 1955΄ The generation of Electricity by wind power΄, Spon Ltd.

10.Βuresch, M. 2002.΄ Photovoltaic Energy Systems΄, McGraw-Hill, .

11.Kreith, F., Kreiderand, J., 2000 ΄Solar Heating and Cooling΄, Hemisphere Publishing Corporation.

12.D . Kanellopoulos , 2003. Wind Energy, Ion Publications. 

MICROCONTROLLERS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures and exercises, face-to-face 
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 2

Laboratory Exercises, 2 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

 

The course consists of the introductory entry level concepts of microprocessors with emphasis on microcontrollers.

The course syllabus aims to introduce the students to programming in machine language (Assembly), as also to electrical engineering applications, like motor control and automations in a power grid monitoring system.

Furthermore, analysis of microcontroller architecture is attempted and a study on connecting to peripheral integrated circuits as well as instruction decoding and practicing on A/D converter applications.

The aim of this course is the development of skills on application analysis and design with the use of microcontrollers.

 

On course completion the student should be able to:

 

-Design automation systems with the PIC18F882 and PIC16f84 microcontrollers.

-Program in machine language.

-Control a step motor with the use of a microcontroller.

-Perform monitoring on the electric high voltage network (power grid).

-Design A/D and D/A systems.

-Make use of systems with PWM.

-Design measurement and display systems (temperature, pressure, humidity, etc.). 

Module Description

 

-Introduction to microcontrollers

-Use of 8bit and 16bit registers

-Microcontroller architecture

-Microcontroller connection to peripheral integrated circuits

-Memory address decoding

-Programming in machine language

-I/O with peripheral integrated circuits

-Step motor control

-Analog motor motion control

-D/A and A/D conversion

-Decoding instructions

-Monitoring energy power grid

-Use of systems with PWM 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

 

Language of Evaluation: Greek and English for students  Erasmus.

Theory

Written final examination (GE) (60%) that it includes:

-  Questions of short answer- Exercises of theory

Laboratory

Laboratory examination of  (40%) that it includes:

- Weekly laboratory  work 

- Final Examination 

The laboratory part is evaluated in the last lab session with 50% weight on a written exam and 50% on practical assessment. 

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Recommended Book and Journal Article Resources:

 

       Basic Manual:

1.Alatsathianos S., (2008).  Introduction to microcontrollers  PIC micro , ISBN 978-96092596-0-6. (in Greek) 

 Greek or Greek translated books:

1.Predko M.  (1999). Programming the Microcontroller  PIC, Tziolas publications, ISBN 960-7219-94-5. 

2.Gilmore C.M., (2006) Microprocessors , Tziolas publications., ISBN 978-960-7219-88-6.  

6th Semester

INTERIOR ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS I

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures, laboratories 
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 4

Laboratory Exercises, 2 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

 

A. THEORY

The objective of the theory part is the student :

•to get familiar with the main types of low voltage interior electrical installations and the relative regulations applied

•to be able to design low voltage interior electrical installations & to study drawings concerning low voltage electrical installations and comprehend terms and specifications of them

•to know the hardware, circuits and devices needed for constructing a LV interior electrical installation and the specifications which have to satisfy

•to understand the calculations which have to be made and the selection criteria which have to be applied in order to have the optimum selection, construction and synthesis of the above components

•to be familiarized with earthing and protection devices of an LV interior electrical installation

 

 

B. LABORATORY

 

The objective of the laboratory part is the student :

•to be familiarized with interior electrical installations characteristics and its basic parts.

•to understand the operation of a LV interior Electrical Installation

•to Know how a LV interior Electrical Installation is designed and constructed 

•to be able to recognize the components of a low voltage electrical installation 

•to be able to carry out the necessary inspections & testing in a LV interior Electrical Installation

•to understand how electrical energy from a supply company is distributed in a building

 

Upon completion of the course, students will be able to: 

1.Acquire the knowledge and the understanding of issues related to LV interior Electrical Installations in general. 

2.Perceive, interpret and clearly explain issues related to LV interior Electrical Installations.

3.Use all the concepts related to LV interior Electrical Installations, to provide new calculations, to be able to correctly classify the causes of the various problems and generate new knowledge, while gaining implementation experience.

4.Revise old views related to LV interior Electrical Installations, so they can create new knowledge. Also, be able to compose and organize working groups and propose solutions.

5.Participate in measuring-experimental procedures for LV interior Electrical Installations. Know to handle suitable measuring devices and also to be able to evaluate the measurements results in order to judge situations correctly, proposing in each case the appropriate solution.

6.Work with their fellow students, to create and present both at individual and group level a case study from its initial stages up to the final evaluation and finally to be able to propose new ideas and solutions. 

Module Description

A. THEORY

The theory part of the course consists of the following modules:

•Introduction – General  Aspects .

•International Standards & Greek Regulation of Electrical Installations (ELOT HD 384).

•LV Conductors & Power Cables.

•Electrical materials for low voltage interior electrical installations

•Calculations in LV Interior  Electrical Installations according to ELOT HD 384

•LV Protection Devices

•Standard low voltage supplies – Distribution Boards

•Design & Study & Construction of LV Interior Electrical Installations

 

B. LABORATORY  

The Laboratory part of the course consists of the following separate modules:

•Introduction - Effects of  alternating & direct current on human beings - Protection against both direct and indirect contact   

•Lighting Circuits Connections for Interior Electrical Installations

•Design & Construction of 1-phase & 3-phase Electrical Panel / LV Distribution Board 

•LV Earthing / Grounding Systems (Design & Construction)

•Design & Study & Construction of LV Interior Electrical Installations

•Weak Current Electrical Installation &  Services

•Inspection & Testing of LV Internal Electrical Installations (according to Part 6, ELOT HD 384)

•Introduction in Home Automation 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination: 60%

Laboratory exercise: 40% 

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Kokkinos D. “Foundational Grounding”, 2008, Editions ELEMKO (in Greek)

2.Gunter G. Seip, “Electrical Installations”, 2004, Editions TZIOLA, (in Greek)

3.Panagiotopoulos N. “Γειώσεις Βιομηχανικών – Επαγγελματικών Κτιρίων και Κατοικιών, 2004, Editions PAPASOTIRIOU (in Greek)

4.Dokopoulos P. “Consumers Electrical Installations”, 2005, Editions ZITIS (in Grreek)

5.Touloglou S., Stergiou V.  “Electrical Installations”, 2008, Editions ION (in Greek)

6.Michalis P.  “Electrical Installations”, 2007, Editions ION (in Greek)

7.Kimoulakis N. “Building Electrical Installations”,, 2006, Editions PAPASOTIRIOU (in Greek)

8.Sarris G. “Check of Building Electrical Installations”, 2011, Editions PAPASOTIRIOU (in Greek)

9.Lecturer Notes (in Greek)

ELECTROTECHNICAL APPLICATIONS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures, laboratories , distance learning methods  
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 4

Laboratory, 2 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, students will have:

1.Knowledge of the operating principles and the individual parts of which comprised household and similar appliances.

2.Knowledge of security and operational requirements of household and similar electrical appliances.

3.Ability to design heating elements and magnetic components.

4.Ability heaters selection based on their characteristics and thermal needs of an area.

5.Knowledge of cooling systems operating principles and heat pumps.

6.Knowledge of the operating principles of arc welding and their operating characteristics, both theoretically and experimentally.

7.Knowledge of the operating principles of resistive and inductive heating systems.

More specifically:

1.Be able to understand the operation and detect errors and faults in household and similar appliances.

2.Have knowledge of the operating and safety testing of household and similar electrical appliances.

3.Be able to design heating elements and magnetic components according to specific operating requirements.

4.Be able to calculate and choose refrigeration systems, heat pumps and heat in cooling applications and space heating.

5.Be able to understand how they operate devices resistive and inductive heating and opt for systems of heat treatment depending on the application. 

Module Description

A. THEORY

The theory part of the course consists of the following modules:

1st Module:Household and Similar Electrical Appliances Components: Thermostats - Electrical Heating Resistances for Household Appliances - Motor for Electric Appliances.

2nd Module:Household and Similar Appliances: Electric Kitchen - Electric Water Heater - Electric Refrigerator - Thermoelectric Cooler - Microwave Oven.

3rd Module:Design of Heating Resistance: Heat Transfer - Energy Requirements of Electric Heating - Heating by Conduction and Convection- Power Requirements - Heat Radiation - Heating Elements - Operating Temperature of Electrothermal Devices - Temperature Sensors

4th Module:Design of Magnetic Components: Magnetic Materials and Cores - Coil Inductance Design - Transformer Design.

5th Module:Compression Cycle Technology Devices: Introduction to Cooling - Basic Cooling Device - Refrigeration Cycle - Refrigerants - Introduction to Heat Pumps - Heat Pumps Categories - Heat Sources - Application of Heat Pump to Water Heating.

6th Module:Electric Thermo accumulators: Introduction - Working Principle - Thermo accumulators parts - Calculation of Thermo accumulators.

7th Module:Metal Arc Welding: Arc Welding Categories - Arc Welding Power Sources - Rotary Welding Machines - Transformer Welding Machines  - Rectifier Type Welding Machine - Inverter Type Welding Machines - Welding Machine Selection / Specifications.

8th Module:Conduction Heating: Basic Electrical and Electrothermal Equations - AC current in Conductors - AC current in semi infinite plate - AC current in Rectangular Plate - AC current in Circular Cross-Section Conductors - AC current Hollow Conductors.

9th Module:Induction Heating: Basic Resonant Circuits - Current Source Inverter for Induction Heating - Voltage Source Inverter for Induction Heating - Induction heating semi-resonant converter.

 

B. LABORATORY

The Laboratory part of the course consists of the following separate modules:

1st Module:Information and Familiarization with the Lab and Equipment - Lab Regulations

2nd Module:Study of the Electrical Characteristics (V-I) of Incandescent Lamps "

3rd Module:Capacitive Power Compensation "

4th Module:Study of the V-I Characteristics of Conventional Welding Machines

5th Module:Study of the V-I Characteristics of Inverter-Type Welding Machines

6th Module:Study of the B-H diagram of Ferromagnetic Material (Iron)

7th Module:Design and Construction of Single-Phase Transformer 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Evaluation Language : Greek

Theory

Final Written Exams: 100%

Laboratory

Final Written Exams: 60%

Individual project/paper: 40%

 

The grade of the course is estimated as:

 

60% x Theory + 40% x Laboratory grades 

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Machias AB (1984). Electromechanical Installations. Athens (in Greek)

2.Machias AB (1988). Study and Design of Electrical Installations. Symeon publications, Athens (in Greek)

3.Dimopoulos F (1990). Lighting Technology, Electrical Devices. Dimopoulos publications, Athens (in Greek)

4.Dimopoulos F (1990). Κανονισμοί Ε.Η.Ε &Τυπολογία του Ηλεκτρολόγου. Dimopoulos publications, Athens (in Greek)

5.Touloglou S (1998). Household Electrical Devices. Ion publications, Athens (in Greek)

6.Touloglou S, Stergiou E (1991). Electrical Installations. Ion publications, Athens (in Greek)

7.Bourkas PD (1991). Building-Industrial Designs and Installations. Symeon publications, Athens (in Greek)

8.Chalikia SN (1992). Heating-Cooling-Ventilation. Athens (in Greek)

9.Kouremenou D,  Chatzidaki S (1994). Cooling Technology Notes, NTUA publications, Athens (in Greek)

10.Chapman SJ (2005). Electric machinery Fundamentals, 4th edition. Mc Grow Hill

11.Mohan N, Undeland TM (1995). Power Electronics, Converters, Applications and Design. John Wiley & Son

12.Manias SN (2014). Power Electronics. Symeon publications, Athens (in Greek)

13.Manias SN, Kaletsanos Α (2001). Industrial  Electronics. Symeon publications, Athens (in Greek)

14.Metaxas AC (1996). Foundations of Electroheat, A Unified Approach. John Wiley & Sons.

15.Davies EJ (1979). Induction Heating Handbook.  Mcgraw-Hill Book Company Ltd, London.

16.Cary HB (1998). Modern Welding Technology, Prentice Hall

17.Johns AT, Platts JR, Ratcliffe G (1990). Conduction and Induction Heating. Peter Peregrinus Ltd.

18.Siemens and John Wiley & Sons (1985). Electrical Engineering Handbook. John Wiley & Sons, New York.

19.Lowencheim FA  (1974). Modern Electroplating. Electrochemical Society, 

20.Schlesinger Μ, Paunovic M (2000). Modern Electroplating. John Wiley & Sons. 

ELECTRICAL POWER GENERATION AND ECONOMIC OPERATON OF ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: In-class with the physical presence of students 
Weekly Hours: Lectures4 
ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

 

The objective of the course is to make the student familiar with the production of electrical energy in regard to the needs of specific consumer areas in order to be able to appreciate the relative procedures from the technical, economic and social point of view. The acquisition of knowledge during the period of studies should make the student and future graduate able to understand the specialized knowledge concerning any aspect of production procedures and thus to work efficiently in relative positions.

Targets of the course are the students to be able :

1.to understand the development of electrical energy needs of various consumer areas and the relative mathematical analysis of it,

2.to describe and use from technical point of view the various methods of electrical energy production and to classify and use them from economic and operational point of view,

3.to understand the relationship between the electrical loads and the respective power production installations on the base of economic and technological criteria,

4.to use the methods and criteria of forming the selling price list of electrical energy 

Module Description

Electricity Boards, Production methods of electrical energy, Formation of electrical energy system, Analysis of electrical consumers, Description and basic calculations from electrical point of view of production installations, Criteria of load satisfaction from electrical production systems, Electrical economy elements, Forming of electrical energy price list.

Function and control of electrical energy systems, energy control centres, hardware and software of energy control, study and forecast of electric load, load curves, least squares method, the production system, thermic energy plants- characteristic curves, hydroelectric energy plants- characteristic curves, economic load dispatch of thermic energy plants, linear programming, Lagrange method, economic energy dispatch considering production-load equivalence, Newton-Raphson method, economic energy dispatch considering production-load equivalence and the functional limits of production plants, economic energy dispatch considering production-load equivalence, the functional limits of production plants and transmission losses, hydro-thermic energy plant co-operation, economic energy dispatch considering the transmission grid limits, generalized Kuhn-Tucker method, electrical energy exchanges, economic electrical energy exchanges, energy exchanges and plant entry. 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination: 100% 

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.«Economic operation of electric power systems», Bakirtzis A., Ziti Publ., 2001 (in Greek). 

2.«Economic analysis of electric systems», Lekatsas E., ΤΕΕ Publ., 1996 (in Greek).

3.«Generation, transmission, distribution, measurement and economy of electric energy»,    Xanthos B., Ziti Publ., 2006 (in Greek).

4.«Introduction to electric power systems», Giannakopoulos G., Vovos N., Ziti Publ., 2008 (in Greek).

5.«Electric power transmission lines», Papadias B., Symmetria Publ., 2008 (in Greek).

6.«Introduction to electric power systems», Dokopoulos P., Paratiritis Publ.,1986 (in Greek).

7.«Electric Energy Systems», Elgerd O., McGraw-Hill,2004.

8.«Electric energy systems : An Introduction», O.I. Elgerd, McGraw-Hill,1982.

9.«IEEE Standards collection of power energy substations», IEEE,1998.

10.«Power system control and stability» , P. Anderson , A. Fouad,  IEEE,1995.

11.«Computer modelling of electrical power systems», J. Arrilaga et al, John Wiley,1983.

12.«Electrical power system design», M. Deshpande, McGraw-Hill,1984.

13.«Electrical power system quality», R.C. Dugan et al, McGraw-Hill,1996.

14.«Electrical power systems», M. El-Hawary, IEEE, 1983.

15.«Simulation and control of electrical power systems», J.B. Knowles,  Research Studies Press, 1990.

16.«Power system operation», B. Miller, J. Malinowski, McGraw-Hill,1994. 

17.«Direct energy conversion: Fundamentals of electric power production», R. Decher,       Oxford Univ. Press, 1997.

18.«Electric energy systems», S.A. Nasar et al, Prentice Hall,1996. 

19.«Power generation operation and control», A. Wood , B. Wolenberg , John Wiley,1996. 

20.«Computer methods in power systems analysis», G.W. Stagg , A.H. El-Abiad, McGraw-Hill,1986.

21.«Electrical Energy Systems», M. Hawary, CRC Press, 2000.

BUILDING MECHANICAL INSTALLATIONS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures and exercises, face-to-face
Weekly Hours: Lectures4 
ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The objective of the course is to help the student :

 

•to obtain a profound and complete knowledge of modern technology applied to building mechanical installations. Specifically, to get familiar with the main types of building installations and the relative regulations applied. 

•to be able to recognize the components of a building mechanical installation. 

•to understand the calculations which have to be made and the selection criteria which have to be applied in order to have the optimum selection, construction and synthesis of the above components.

•to be able to design building mechanical installations

 

Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

•Understand the basics and individual characteristics of building mechanical installations.

•Study and management of building mechanical installations.

•Evaluate comparing different systems applicable to building mechanical installations.

•Analyzes and calculates the basics and components of a building mechanical installation.

•To describe and identify the parts, to choose the functions and operations of a building mechanical installation.

•To explain the operation of a building installation, to assess performance and to calculate the operating parameters.

•Perceive, interpret and clearly explain issues related to building mechanical installations.

•Use all the concepts related to building mechanical installations, to provide new calculations, to be able to correctly classify the causes of the various problems and generate new knowledge, while gaining implementation experience.

•Revise old views related to building mechanical installations, so they can create new knowledge. Also, be able to compose and organize working groups and propose solutions.

•Work with their fellow students, to create and present both at individual and group level a case study from its initial stages up to the final evaluation and finally to be able to propose new ideas and solutions. 

Module Description

The core modules of the course include:

 

1.Introduction to Building Mechanical Installations

2.Interior Water Supply and Sewerage   installations of buildings. 

3.Natural Gas Applications in Buildings.Basics. 

4.Standards and regulations. Definitions. 

5.Basic components. Basic Calculations – Understanding of Mechanical Installations Designs

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination: 100% 

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.P. Charonis “Building Mechanical Inastallations”, Part A, 2003, Editions Sichrini  Ekdotiki, ISBN 9608165-53 (in Greek)

2.P. Charonis “Building Mechanical Inastallations”, Part B, 2003, Editions Sichrini  Ekdotiki, ISBN 9608165-53 (in Greek)

3.G. Papanikas “Natural Gas Technologies”, 1997, Editions Vortex (in Greek)

4.Stein B.-Reynolds J. “ Mechanical and electrical equipment for buildings”, Editions J. Wiley / ISBN 0-471-52502-2. (in Greek)

5.G. Viazis “Fire protection - legislation, studies”,1998, Editions Paapsotiriou (in Grek)

6.K. Lefas “ Introduction of gas technology”, 1991, Editions Fivos (in Greek)

7.Brickle S. “Heat-Plumbing Installations”, Editions European Technologies, (in Greek)

8.Eckenfelder HC “Industrial Water Pollution Control”,  2000, Editions McGraw (in Greek)

9.Lecturer Notes (in Greek) 

ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures and exercises, Face to face  
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 3

Exercises, 1 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The course aims to familiarize students with the European directives relating to the design, construction and operation of electrical equipment and installations and associated with the environment. Upon completion of the course, students will have:

1.In-depth knowledge and critical understanding of the connection of energy generation and usage with the environment.

2.Knowledge of the energy efficiency and energy savings demand in everyday life and has acquired the ability to recognize and select equipment and devices based on this criterion. Also has the ability to perform the studies and work and to assess their results considering this parameter.

3.Knowledge and ability to use the principles of ecological design (Eco-Design) in his professional activity.

4.Knowledge of the alternative but closely related activity and professional engagement fields, while coming into contact with new environmental regulations that define the design and operation and the end of life cycle of electrical equipment and installations.

5.Knowledge about the legislation on the end of life treatment and recycling potential of waste electrotechnical equipment

6.In depth understanding of the relationship of the profession of Electrical Engineering and the environment and their interdependence.

7.Ability to apply that knowledge in his/hers business life. 

Module Description

The theory part of the course consists of the following modules:

1st Module:Energy and environmental policies and their interdependence.

2nd Module:Energy generation and environment, greenhouse gasses emissions and climate change.

3rd Module:Energy efficiency and energy saving: Introduction to energy efficiency in products and systems. 

4th Module:The European Directives Eco-label, Energy-label, Eco-design, RoHs, EMAS, and their application to equipment and various industrial devices

5th Module:The life cycle analysis in the production and operation of the equipment

6th Module:End-of-life of waste electrical, electronic and industrial equipment. Legislation

7th Module:Designing systems in accordance with the instructions for EcoDesign. 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Evaluation Language : Greek

English for Erasmus students

 

Theory

Final Written Exams: 100%

Individual Project

Final report + presentation : 100%

 

The grade of the course is 

70% x Theory + 30% x Individual project 

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Wiel S., McMahon J.E., (2005), Energy-Efficiency Labels and Standards: A Guidebook for Appliances, Equipment, and Lighting, 2nd Edition. CLASP, Washington, D.C., USA.

2.WRI and WBC for Sustainable Development, (2005), The Greenhouse Gas Protocol, Guidelines for Quantifying GHG Reductions from Grid-Connected Electricity Projects, WRI Report. 

3.EEA, (2005), Climate change and a European low-carbon energy system, ΕΕΑ, Copenhagen.

4.EEA, (2007), Europe’s Environment: The 4th Assessment, ΕΕΑ, Copenhagen.

5.Wimmer W., Züst R., and Lee K.-M., (2004), ECODESIGN Implementation - A systematic guidance on integrating environmental considerations into product development. Springer, Berlin.

6.Wimmer, W., Züst, R., (2003), Ecodesign PILOT, Product Investigation, Learning and Optimization Tool for Sustainable Product Development, with CD-ROM, Alliance for Global Sustainability Series Vol. 3, Kluwer Academic Publisher, Dordrecht, Boston, London

7.Williams E., Lotstein R., Galik C., Knuffman H., (2007), A Convenient Guide to Climate Change Policy and Technology, CLIMATE CHANGE POLICY PARTNERSHIP, Duke University, Durham

8.Jayamaha L., (2007), Energy-Efficient Building Systems: Green Strategies for Operation and Maintenance, McGraw-Hill Professional Publishing, N York

9.Wulfinghoff D.R., (20000, Energy Efficiency Manual, Energy Institute Press, Wheaton, Maryland, USA.

10.Sudhakara Reddy B., (2009), Energy Efficiency and Climate Change: Conserving Power for a Sustainable Future, Sage Publications Chennai

11.Parasiliti F., Bertoldi P., (2003), Energy Efficiency in Motor Driven Systems, Springer Berlin

12.Solmes L., (2009), Energy Efficiency: Real Time Energy Infrastructure Investment And Risk Management, Springer

13.Instructor's Notes 

RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES II

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures, laboratories , distance learning methods  
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 2

Laboratory, 2 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The course aims to introduce the student to the various techniques of design, construction and methods of dimensioning energy systems from renewable energy sources .Upon completion of the course, students will have:

1.Ability to analyze wind and solar data of specific site

2.Knowledge of the technical characteristics and performance of electric power generation by wind, photovoltaic and other renewable energy systems.

3.Ability to analyze wind conditions, and wind farm layout possibilities of the particular site.

4.Ability to analyze solar conditions, and solar farm layout possibilities of the particular site.

5.Knowledge of security and operational requirements of wind. 

6.Ability to perform basic calculations and analysis for grid connection of a wind turbine and photovoltaic plants.

7.Ability to design a wind conversion system, component, or process to meet desired needs.

8.Ability to design a photovoltaic system, component, or process to meet desired need.

 

More specifically: 

1.Basic knowledge of solar energy, solar geometry and photovoltaic effect, different technologies and be able to calculate the energy efficiency and design of PV systems.

2.Knowledge of solar panels structure (the main criteria which declare the most effective type of solar panel).

3.Introduce the main characteristics -watt-hours, peak power-  and criteria for selecting an appropriate inverter)

4. Be able to choose the correct cable cross section for each study.

5.Knowledge of transformers, electrical generation transmission and distribution systems. 

6.Knowledge of fundamental Principles of Grounding of Lightning Protection Systems and the major importance for the whole installation.

7.Be able to know the quality regulations for mechanical equipment.

8.Be able to know about improving efficiency and reducing cost and familiarize with advancements in Wind Turbine Technology.

9.Analysis of Land - inshore - offshore wind farms.

10.Study of energy wind farms (Influence of surface barriers, factors that affect the speed and the direction of wind, variation of wind speed with height).

11.Ability to make a final technical-economical study. 

Module Description

A. THEORY

 

The theory part of the course consists of the following modules:

 

1st Module:Solar Energy-photovoltaic technology: modeling of solar cells, effect of temperature and radiation intensity.

2nd Module:    Solar panels : structure, effect of shading, practical rules of their topology - energy gain panels in each country

3rd Module:Solar Inverters : elaboration on the technical characteristics to conclude to the appropriate choice

4th Module:Medium Voltage Substations: Electrical generation, transmission, and distribution systems.

5th Module:    Grounding and Lightning Protection System: Lightning conductors and grounding precautions, Lightning protection system design.

6th Module:Wind technology: Small wind electric systems, wind turbines and resources.

7th Module:Study of wind energy conversion system: Wind regime and energy yield analysis, design evaluation including access and transport, ground investigation specification and monitoring, energy                                     storage, environmental effects and technical - economical aspects.

8th Module:  Study of photovoltaic system : solar energy yield analysis, design evaluation including access and transport, ground investigation, specification and monitoring, energy storage, environmental effects                      and technical - economical aspects

 

B. LABORATORY

 

The Laboratory part of the course consists of the following separate modules:

 

1st Module:Information and Familiarization with the Lab and Equipment - Lab Regulations

2nd Module:Study of a Photovoltaic Generator System

  • Implementation topology selection and photovoltaic panel selection.
  • Selection of inverter, batteries-capacity, charge controller
  • Dimensioning of the photovoltaic panels, connection drawing, cable cross connection calculation, batteries and equipment storing.
  • Technical Economic Analysis (profit, depreciation time, KWh, etc )

3th Module:Study of a Wind Generator Power System and its annual energy

  • Implementation topology selection, global wind patterns and maps, infrastructure works, wind pilar etc.
  • Technical and economic characteristics of the wind power generator, Selection of inverter, batteries-capacity, charge controller, Dimensioning of the generators, connection drawing, cable cross connection calculation, batteries and equipment storing.
  • Electrology works, and Technical Economic Analysis (profit, depreciation time, KWh, etc ). 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Evaluation Language : Greek

English for Erasmus students

 

Theory

Final Written Exams: 100%

 

Laboratory

Final Written Exams:: 70%

Team laboratory exercise report : 30%

 

The grade of the course is 

60% x Theory + 40% x Laboratory grades  

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Bizionis B., Bizionis D., Alternative Energy Sources , 2014 ,Tziolas Publications , 2nd edition, ISBN: 978-960-418-309-8, Thessaloniki .

2.Kaldellis John. K. Kavadias Kosmas A . ,2001. Laboratory renewable forms of energy. STAMOULI Publishing Inc.ISBN: 960-351-345-8, Athens .

3.Charonis Panagiotis.1988. Passive Solar Greenhouses. Ion Publications. 1st edition. ISBN: 960-405-062-1,Athens .

4.Balarás K , Argyríou A , Karagiánnis F, 2006. Conventional and Renewable Energy Sources, Tekdotiki Publications. 1st edition , ISBN: 960-8257-23-9, Athens.

5.Socrates Kaplanis , 2004. Renewable Energy Sources I , II , III , Ion Publications , 1st edition , ISBN: 960-411-429-8, 960-411-430-1, 960-411-431- X, Athens.

6.Asimakopoulos D ,. Arabatzis G. Aggelis - Dimakis A . , Kartalidis A . , Tsiligiridis C ., 2015. Renewable Energy - Resources and Technologies  Sofia Pubications, 1st edition , ISBN: 978-960-6706-76- 9 Thessaloniki.

7.Fragiadakis . Photovoltaic Systems. Ziti Publicatios.

8.Neocleous , A. , Konstantinidis. 2003. Photovoltaic systems, Ion Publications .

9.Golding, W. 1955΄ The generation of Electricity by wind power΄, Spon Ltd.

10.Βuresch, M. 2002.΄ Photovoltaic Energy Systems΄, McGraw-Hill, .

11.Kreith, F., Kreiderand, J., 2000 ΄Solar Heating and Cooling΄, Hemisphere Publishing Corporation.

12.D . Kanellopoulos , 2003. Wind Energy, Ion Publications.1. 

ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: In-class with the physical presence of students 
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 4

Laboratory, 2 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The objective of the course is to make the student familiar with the transmission and distribution of electrical energy from the places of production to consumer areas and isolated consumers in order to be able to appreciate the relative procedures from the technical, economic and social point of view. 

Targets of the course are the students to be able :

1.to understand all the specialized knowledge concerning any aspect of transmission and distribution procedures and thus to work efficiently in relative positions.  

Module Description

THEORY

Introductory elements of sinusoidal voltage circuits, voltage, current, resistance, inductance capacitance, Chirchoff’s laws, Ohm’s law, power, real power, reactive power, apparent power, power factor, inductance and capacitance under dynamic and static state, impedance and admittance under static state, distribution systems, computer use in power systems, power system equipment, aerial transmission lines, inductance of aerial transmission lines, capacitance of aerial transmission lines, short length transmission line, medium length transmission line, great length transmission line, presentation of aerial transmission line under steady state in the form of divided elements, electric equivalent circuit of aerial transmission line under steady state in the form of divided elements, development of the mathematical equations of line voltage and current as a function of distance, theoretical interpretation of the previous mathematical equations of line voltage and current, wave behaviour of line voltage and current, estimation and interpretation of line voltage and current equations parameters (line characteristic resistance, transmission co-efficient, decrement co-efficient, phase co-efficient, line wave length, line voltage and current refraction co-efficient, wave transmission velocity, wave travelling time, etc.), line special cases (line without losses, line without deformation, normal line), exponential form of line equations, hyperbolic form of line equations, typical line terminations (open line, Ferranti phenomenon, short circuit line, line with terminal resistance equivalent to line characteristic resistance), estimation of apparent resistance at the beginning and the end of line, relationship between them, π and τ equivalent line circuit, applications, introduction to per unit system, using the per unit system in transmission line studies and calculations, aerial line statics, estimation of line conductor curve, length and height, approximate equations of line conductor curve, length and height, wind and ice influence on line conductor, suspension of line conductor on inclined ground, calculations, applications.

 

LABORATORY

Estimation of phase succession in 3-phase line

Parameters estimation of 3-phase transmission line

Real and reactive power measurement of 3-phase consumer

Short length 3-phase transmission line

Medium length 3-phase transmission line

Ferranti phenomenon in 3-phase transmission line

3-phase transmission line in the form of 4-pole circuit

Voltage fluctuation of 3-phase transmission line 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination: 60%

Laboratory exercise: 40% 

Recommended or required Bibliography

  1) «Economic operation of electric power systems», Bakirtzis A., Ziti Publ., 2001 (in Greek). 

  2) «Economic analysis of electric systems», Lekatsas E., ΤΕΕ Publ., 1996 (in Greek).

  3) «Generation, transmission, distribution, measurement and economy of electric energy», 

       Xanthos B., Ziti Publ., 2006 (in Greek).

  4) «Introduction to electric power systems», Giannakopoulos G., Vovos N., Ziti Publ., 2008    

       (in Greek).

  5) «Electric power transmission lines», Papadias B., Symmetria Publ., 2008 (in Greek).

  6) «Introduction to electric power systems», Dokopoulos P., Paratiritis Publ.,1986 (in Greek).

  7) «Power Systems Analysis», Grainger J., Stevenson W., McGraw-Hill,1994.

  8) «Electric Power Systems», Weedy B., John Wiley and Sons, 2002.

  9) «Electric Energy Systems», Elgerd O., McGraw-Hill,2004.

10) «The Transmission and Distribution of Electrical Energy», Cotton H., Barber H.,

       The English University Press,1970.

11) «Theory and Problems of Transmission Lines», Chipman R., McGraw-Hill,1968.

12) «Fault calculations of industrial commercial power systems», IEEE, 1994.

13) «Electric energy systems : An Introduction», O.I. Elgerd, McGraw-Hill,1982.

14)  «Engineering in safety maintenance and operation of lines», IEEE,1993 .

15) «IEEE Standards collection of power energy substations», IEEE,1998.

16) «Power system control and stability» , P. Anderson , A. Fouad,  IEEE,1995.

17) «Computer modelling of electrical power systems», J. Arrilaga et al, John Wiley,1983.

18) «Transmission and distribution , Electrical engineering», C.R. Bayliss, Newnes ,1999.

19) «lntroduction to electrical power system technology», T.R. Bosela , Prentice Hall,1997.

20) «Elements of power systems analysis», W. Stevenson, McGraw-Hill,1982.

21) «Electric power systems», B.M. Weedy, B.S. Cory, John Wiley,1998.

22) «AC power systems handbook», J. Whitaker, CRC Press,1999.

23) «Electrical power system design», M. Deshpande, McGraw-Hill,1984.

24) «Electrical power system quality», R.C. Dugan et al, McGraw-Hill,1996.

25) «Electrical power systems», M. El-Hawary, IEEE, 1983.

26) «Electrical power distribution and transmission», L. Faulkenberry, W. Coffer,

        Prentice Hall,1996.

27) «Modern power system analysis», T. Gonen, John Wiley, 1987.

28) «Power system analysis», J. Grainger, W. Stevenson , McGraw-Hill,1994.

29) «Power system analysis», C.A. Gross, John Wiley, 1986.

30) «Power system stability», E. Kimbark, IEEE,1995.

31) «Simulation and control of electrical power systems», J.B. Knowles,

       Research Studies Press, 1990.

32) «Power system operation», B. Miller, J. Malinowski, McGraw-Hill,1994. 

33) «Direct energy conversion: Fundamentals of electric power production», R. Decher,  

       Oxford Univ. Press, 1997.

34) «Electric energy systems», S.A. Nasar et al, Prentice Hall,1996. 

35) «Power generation operation and control», A. Wood , B. Wolenberg , John Wiley,1996. 

36) «Computer methods in power systems analysis», G.W. Stagg , A.H. El-Abiad,

       McGraw-Hill,1986.

37) «Electrical Energy Systems», M. Hawary, CRC Press, 2000.

38) «Electrical Power Systems Design and Analysis», M. Hawary, IEEE Press, 1996.

39) «Power System Analysis and Design», J. Glover, PWS Publishing Company, 1994.

40) «Electric Power Distribution Systems Engineering», T. Gönen, McGraw-Hill, 1986. 

MEASUREMENT AND SENSOR TECHNOLOGY

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures, laboratory practice 
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 2

Laboratory, 2 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

This course aims to introduce the student, theoretically and practically, in measuring procedures for determining the true value of electrical and non-electrical quantities, taking into account the reentrant errors.

The student must develop the capacity for independent implementation of integrated measuring procedures necessary for the research and the overall production process.

 

Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able to:

•       examine complex electrical and electronic circuits.

•       describe and interpret the phenomena that occur in complex electrical and electronic circuits.

•       apply the basic knowledge of electrical engineering and electronics in resolving complex circuits.

•       associate the results of theoretical analysis with those of the processing of experimental measurements in a circuit.

•       design and construct circuits.

•      propose solutions to technical issues. 

Module Description

A. THEORY

•      Measurement of real, reactive and apparent power in AC single - and multi-phase (three-phase) systems.

•      Single-phase and multi-phase wattmeters.

•      Measurement of power factor (cosφ).

•      Phase sequence in three-phase system.

•      Electrical energy measurement.

•      Electronic/digital measurements - Digital instruments (voltmeters - ammeters - ohmmeters - wattmeters - reactive power meters - electricity meters).

•      Comparisons of classic and digital measurements.

•      Measurements of non-electrical quantities.

•      Sensors and transducers (voltage - intensity - load power - length - bending torque - temperature - ph - speed - air - containing gases - humidity - mechanical stress etc).

B. LABORATORY

•       Laboratory safety regulations.

•       Real power measurement.

•       Electrodynamic voltmeter.

•       Impedance measurement.

•       Maxwell bridge.

•       Power factor measurement.

•       Three-phase real and reactive power measurement.

•       AC measurements with dual beam oscilloscope.

•      Voltage measurement of a dimmer.

•      Electrical energy measurement.

•      Phase sequence determination.

•      Recording instruments.

•       De Sauty bridge.

•       Power factor improvement.

•       Temperature measurement.

•       Moisture Measurement.

•       Sound level measurement.

•       Illuminance measurement. 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

I.      Final written exam of theoretical part includes (60% of the total score):

-       Solving theoretical problems relating to the subject of   the course

-       Description / evidence theory data

-       Interim written assessments during the semester.

 

II.     Examination laboratory part  comprising (40% of the   total score):

-       Weekly individual written exam

-       Weekly group technical reports

-       Written final exam

-       Practical final examination 

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Πετρίδης Β. (2000). ΣΥΣΤΗΜΑΤΑ ΜΕΤΡΗΣΕΩΝ, Θεσσαλονίκη: University Studio Press. 

2.Θεοδώρου Ν. Ι. (2001). ΗΛΕΚΤΡΙΚΕΣ ΜΕΤΡΗΣΕΙΣ - Τόμος ΙΙ, Αθήνα: Συμμετρία.

3.Πράπας Δ. (2004). ΤΕΧΝΟΛΟΓΙΑ ΜΕΤΡΗΣΕΩΝ, ΑΡΧΕΣ & ΕΦΑΡΜΟΓΕΣ, Θεσσαλονίκη: ΤΖΙΟΛΑΣ

4.Καλοβρέχτης Κ., Κατέβας Ν. (2013). Αισθητήρες Μέτρησης και Ελέγχου. Θεσσαλονίκη: ΤΖΙΟΛΑΣ

5.Γαστεράτου Αντ., Μουρούτσου Σπ., Ανδρεάδη Ιωάν. (2013). ΤΕΧΝΟΛΟΓΙΑ ΜΕΤΡΗΣΕΩΝ ΑΙΣΘΗΤΗΡΙΑ, Αθήνα: ΤΣΟΤΡΑΣ

6.Μπιτζιώνης Β. Δ. (2011). ΤΡΙΦΑΣΙΚΑ ΚΥΚΛΩΜΑΤΑ Θεωρία και Εφαρμογές, Θεσσαλονίκη: ΤΖΙΟΛΑΣ

7.Μάργαρης Ν. Ι. (2010). ΑΝΑΛΥΣΗ ΗΛΕΚΤΡΙΚΩΝ ΚΥΚΛΩΜΑΤΩΝ. Θεσσαλονίκη: ΤΖΙΟΛΑΣ

8.Hayt Jr. W. H. and Kemmerly J. E. (1991). ΑΝΑΛΥΣΗ ΗΛΕΚΤΡΙΚΩΝ ΚΥΚΛΩΜΑΤΩΝ. 4η Έκδοση. Θεσσαλονίκη: ΤΖΙΟΛΑΣ

9.Σινιόρος Π., Μανουσάκης Ν. (2015), Σημειώσεις «Τεχνολογία Μετρήσεων & Αισθητήρες», Αθήνα: ΑΕΙ Πειραιά ΤΤ 

7th Semester

INTERIOR ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS II

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures and exercises, face-to-face 
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 4

Laboratory Exercises, 2 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

A. THEORY

The objective of the theory part is the student :

•to get familiar with the main types of low voltage (LV) interior industrial electrical installations and the relative regulations applied

•to be able to design low voltage interior industrial electrical installations & to study drawings concerning low voltage industrial electrical installations and comprehend terms and specifications of them

•to know the hardware, circuits and devices needed for constructing a LV interior industrial electrical installation and the specifications which have to satisfy

•to understand the calculations which have to be made and the selection criteria which have to be applied in order to have the optimum selection, construction and synthesis of the above components

•to be familiarized with earthing and protection devices of an LV interior industrial electrical installation

•to understand how electrical energy from a supply company is distributed in a industry

 

 

B. LABORATORY

 

The objective of the laboratory part is the student :

•to be familiarized with (classic & using PLC) automation circuits for electrical motors 

•to understand the operation of an (classic & using PLC) automation circuit for electrical motors

•to Know how an (classic & using PLC) automation circuit for electrical motors is designed and constructed 

•to be able to recognize the components of an (classic & using PLC) automation circuit for electrical motors

•to be able to carry out the necessary inspections & testing in an (classic & using PLC) automation circuit for electrical motors

 

Upon completion of the course, students will be able to: 

1.Acquire the knowledge and the understanding of issues related to LV interior industrial electrical installations as well to (classic & using PLC) automation circuit for electrical motors  in general. 

2.Perceive, interpret and clearly explain issues related to LV interior industrial electrical installations as well to (classic & using PLC) automation circuit for electrical motors.

3.Use all the concepts related to LV interior industrial electrical installations as well to (classic & using PLC) automation circuit for electrical motors, to provide new calculations, to be able to correctly classify the causes of the various problems and generate new knowledge, while gaining implementation experience.

4.Revise old views related to LV interior industrial electrical installations as well to (classic & using PLC) automation circuit for electrical motors, so they can create new knowledge. Also, be able to compose and organize working groups and propose solutions.

5.Participate in measuring-experimental procedures for LV interior industrial electrical installations as well to (classic & using PLC) automation circuit for electrical motors. Know to handle suitable measuring devices and also to be able to evaluate the measurements results in order to judge situations correctly, proposing in each case the appropriate solution.

6.Work with their fellow students, to create and present both at individual and group level a case study from its initial stages up to the final evaluation and finally to be able to propose new ideas and solutions.

Module Description

A. THEORY

The theory part of the course consists of the following modules:

1.Introduction to Industrial Electrical Installations 

2.Standards & Regulations for Industrial Electrical Installations. 

3.Medium Voltage Cables 

4.Cables Overload Calculations (according VDE 298 & Directive No26 of Public Power Corporation of Greece). 

5.Protection & Safety of Medium Voltage Electrical Installations 

6.Grounding / Earthing Systems for Industrial Electrical Installations

7.Power Factor compensation in Industrial Electrical Installations

8.Medium Voltage Panel Boards

9.Medium Voltage Substations for Industrial Electrical Installations 

 

B. LABORATORY  

The Laboratory part of the course consists of the following separate modules:

•Introduction to automation circuits for electrical motors

•Design & Construction of Classic Automation Circuits for electrical motors

•Introduction to PLC

•Design & Construction of Automation Circuits using PLC for electrical motors 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination: 60%

Laboratory exercise: 40% 

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Bitzionis, V “Industrial Electrical Installations”, 2011, Editions Τζιόλας (in Greek)

2.Kokkinos D. “Foundational Grounding”, 2008, Editions ELEMKO (in Greek)

3.Gunter G. Seip, “Electrical Installations”, 2004, Editions TZIOLA, (in Greek)

4.Panagiotopoulos N. “Γειώσεις Βιομηχανικών – Επαγγελματικών Κτιρίων και Κατοικιών, 2004, Editions PAPASOTIRIOU (in Greek)

5.Dokopoulos P. “Consumers Electrical Installations”, 2005, Editions ZITIS (in Grreek)

6.Touloglou S., Stergiou V.  “Electrical Installations”, 2008, Editions ION (in Greek)

7.Michalis P.  “Electrical Installations”, 2007, Editions ION (in Greek)

8.Kimoulakis N. “Building Electrical Installations”,, 2006, Editions PAPASOTIRIOU (in Greek)

9.Sarris G. “Check of Building Electrical Installations”, 2011, Editions PAPASOTIRIOU (in Greek)

10.Touloglou S.,  “Industrial Electrical Installations & Substations”, 2010, Editions ION (in Greek) 

11.Lecturer Notes (in Greek) 

ELECTRIC MOTION

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures, laboratories  
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 3

Laboratory, 2 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, students will have:

1.Knowledge of the operating principles and the individual parts of which comprised a motor control system.

2.Knowledge of the electrical and the mechanical parameters of a motor control system.

3.Ability to design speed and torque controllers.

4.Knowledge of the fundamental principles of the different types of electrical machines.

5.Knowledge of cooling systems operating principles and heat pumps.

6.Knowledge of the basic motion and power transmission systems.

 

More specifically:

1.Be able to understand the operation and detect errors and faults in motor control system.

2.Have knowledge of the operating and safety testing of motor control system.

3.Be able to design the individual parts of a motor control system. 

4.Be able to calculate and choose the individual units of a motor control system . 

Module Description

A. THEORY

The theory part of the course consists of the following modules:

1st Module:Basic principles of Physics 

2nd Module:Electromechanical energy conversion

3rd Module:Fundamental principles of motor control systems

4th Module:Direct current motors

5th Module:Control  techniques of direct current methods 

6th Module:Alternative current motors

7th Module:Control  techniques of alternative current motors

8th Module:Dynamic analysis of electrical machines

 

B. LABORATORY

The Laboratory part of the course consists of the following separate modules:

1st Module:Information and Familiarization with the Lab and Equipment - Lab Regulations

2nd Module:AC/DC converters-torque-speed characteristics of DC motors

3rd Module:DC/DC converters-torque-speed characteristics of DC motors

4th Module:AC/DC/AC converters-torque-speed characteristics of AC motors 

5th Module:DC motor starting techniques

6th Module:AC motor starting techniques 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Evaluation Language : Greek

Theory

Final Written Exams: 100%

Laboratory

Final Written Exams: 60%

Individual project/paper: 40%

 

The grade of the course is estimated as:

 

60% x Theory + 40% x Laboratory grades

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Sen P (1981). Thyristor D.C. Drives. John Wiley & Sons publications, USA1981.

2.Shepherd W, Hulley L (1987). Power Electronics and Motor Control.  Cambridge Univ. Press. Publications, USA

3.Kusko K (1969). Solid-State D.C. Motor Drives.  M.I.T. Press publications, USA

4.Rizzoni G (2006). Electromechanics. Papazisis publications, Thessaloniki (in Greek) 

5.Hughes A (2006). Electric Motors and Drives.  Elsevier Ltd publications, USA

6.Krishnan R (2001).  Electric Motor Drives.  Prentice Hall publications USA

7.Malatestas P (2014), Electric Motion. Tziolas publicatins, Thessaloniki (in Greek)

8.Malatestas P (2012), Electric Motion Solved Problems. Tziolas publicatins, Thessaloniki (in Greek) 

HIGH VOLTAGE ENGINEERING

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures and laboratory exercise, Face to face  
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 3

Laboratory, 2 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, students will have:

1.Knowledge of the high voltage applications and general knowledge about high voltage engineering.

2.Knowledge of the basic gaseous dielectrics, their properties and behavior under high voltage stresses, physicochemical phenomena during breakdown and mechanisms during ionization.

3.Knowledge of the basic liquid dielectrics, their properties and behavior under high voltage stresses, physicochemical phenomena during breakdown and mechanisms and aging effects.

4.Knowledge of the basic solid dielectrics, their properties and behavior under high voltage stresses, physicochemical phenomena during breakdown and mechanisms and aging effects, non-linear conductivity phenomena, macroscopic and microscopic analysis of the aging and breakdown effects.

5.Knowledge of the high voltage testing equipment and methods, requirements for high voltage testing procedures, testing procedures. 

6.The ability to use the above mentioned knowledge to inspect high voltage equipment, check electrotechnical materials and devices. They will be able to analyze and understand the electrical insulation condition in different types of applications, to detect potential risks from malefactions related to dielectric materials, and to propose and implement technical solution targeting the reduction of risk and failure prevention. 

Module Description

A. THEORY

The theory part of the course consists of the following modules:

1st Module:Introduction to high voltage engineering: Basic concepts and definitions, high voltage applications, high electric fields, different forms of electric fields, electrodes’ geometries and basic knowledge. 

2nd Module:Air gaps breakdown theory: Basic gaseous dielectrics. Properties of air gaps, the physics and the phenomena which appear during their use in high voltage equipment and structures. Ionization and breakdown phenomena in air gaps under uniform and non-uniform high electric fields. Townsend’s breakdown theory. Corona effect in electric networks and Corona losses. Streamers and ladders theory on gaseous dielectrics.

3rd Module:SF6 and gaseous mixtures breakdown theory: SF6 physicochemical properties and its behavior under uniform and non-uniform electric fields. Ionization and breakdown phenomena in SF6 gaps under uniform and non-uniform high electric fields. Other gaseous mixtures in high voltage engineering. Phenomena during their use in high voltage equipment and structures.

4rd Module:Liquid dielectric materials: Basic liquid dielectric materials, mineral and natural dielectric oils and their physicochemical properties. Aging and breakdown mechanisms in dielectric oils under uniform and non-uniform electric field stress. Effects during their use in high voltage equipment and structures.

5th Module:Generation and measurement of in high voltage testing: Typical waveforms of high voltages used for equipment testing. AC high voltage testing equipment. DC high voltage circuits (rectifiers, Cocroft, Villard, Greinacher topologies) and testing equipment. Impulse voltage and current testing equipment. Single and multiple stages generators. High voltage measuring equipment selection and design. High Voltage dividers. Schering bridge and dielectric losses measurement. High voltage testing and measuring procedures.

6th Module:Solid dielectric materials: Basic concepts and definitions, basic solid dielectric materials and their properties. Loss Factor (tgδ). Specific Electrical Conductivity. Surface Conductivity. Coefficient of Thermal Conductivity. Mechanical strength. Partial Discharges, starting field / voltage, calculation of charge transportation and its waveform during PDs . Experimental Determination of PD. Measuring capacitor Cm. Macroscopic and Quantum Mechanics related theories during aging and breakdown of solid dielectrics. New theories for the analysis of phenomena, occurring during the operation of high voltage equipment, innovative new materials that will be used in high voltage equipment, etc.

 

B. LABORATORY

The Laboratory part of the course consists of the following separate modules:

1st Module:Laboratory configuration, equipment and operation. Rules of operation and protective measures.

2nd Module:Air gaps breakdown mechanisms under uniform and non-uniform stress.

3rd Module:Breakdown mechanisms in the combination of insulator-air. 

4th Module:Corona discharges and losses in high voltage power lines.

5th Module:Voltage distribution along catenary type, high voltage insulators

6th Module:Dielectric strength and breakdown voltage of dielectric oils

7th Module:Measurement of the capacitance and power loss factor (tgδ) in dielectrics using Schering bridge

8th Module:Theoretical and experimental study of the lightning impulse voltages’ generators

9th Module:Partial discharge measurements during the stress of insulators using different high voltage forms 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Evaluation Language : Greek

English for Erasmus students

 

Theory

Final Written Exams: 100%

Laboratory

Final Written Exams:: 70%

Team laboratory exercise report : 30%

 

The grade of the course is 

60% x Theory + 40% x Laboratory grades 

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Nikolopoulos P.N., (1993), High Voltage – Vol. Α΄,Athens (In Greek).

2.Stathopoulos J., (1988), High Voltage Ι, Pub Simeon, Athens (In Greek)

3.Stathopoulos J., (1989), Protection of technical installations against overvoltages) Pub Simeon, Athens, (In Greek)

4.Oikonokou L., Fotis G., (2008), Introduction to high voltages, Tziolas Publ., Athens (In Greek)

5.Kind D., (1978), An Introduction to High Voltage Experimental Technique, Vieweg.

6.Kuffel E., Abdullah M. , (1970), High-Voltage Engineering, Pergamon Press, Oxford.

7.Schwab A.J.., (1972), High-Voltage Measurement Techniques, MIT Press Cambridge, Massachusetts.

8.Kuffel E., W.S. Zaengl, (1984), High Voltage Engineering Fundamentals, Pergamon Press, Oxford. 

PROTECTION OF ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: In-class with the physical presence of students 
Weekly Hours: Lectures, 2 
ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The course aims at making the student familiar with the protection methods and equipment of electrical energy systems and their different building parts in order to be able to know the way of manufacture and operation of protective devices.

Targets of the course are the students to be able :

1.to understand the malfunctions of electrical energy systems and the estimation of the respective protection needs,

2.to use and describe analytically the protection devices of all electric networks parts from the construction and operation point of view,

3.to understand the need of continuous readiness and effective, preventive maintenance of protective devices from the technical, economic and social point of view. 

Module Description

Operation principles and the role of protection devices. Types and operation of relays. Protection of high voltage electric lines. Protection of electric machines. Protection devices of power plants, substations and electrical installations. Economic analysis of protection devices. 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination: 100%

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Weedy B., «Electric Power Systems», John  Wiley and Sons, 2002

2.Lekatsas E., «Economic analysis of electric systems», ΤΕΕ Publ., 2000 (in Greek)

3.Vovos N., «Protection of electric power systems», Ziti Publ., 2006 (in Greek)

4.Cotton H., Barber H., «The Transmission and Distribution of Electrical Energy»,1970

5.Lewis W., «The Protection of Transmission Systems against Lightning», Wiley, 2002 

LIGHTNING AND SURGE PROTECTION

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures and exercises, Face to face  
Weekly Hours:

Lectures, 2 

ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, students will have:

1.Knowledge of lightning generating mechanisms and the risks and impacts they have.

2.Knowledge of the principles and technical regulations governing surge and overvoltage protection of systems and live beings.

3.Knowledge of the methods and procedures made during the study and design of surge protection systems, and the specification of the materials used there.

4.Ability to apply this knowledge in the preparation and design of surge and lightning protection studies. The ability to use the above mentioned knowledge to inspect surge and lightning protection installations. They will be able to analyze and understand the risk due to lightning strokes and surges in different types of applications, to detect potential risks from non – conformed to the standards installations and to propose and implement technical solution targeting the reduction of risk and failure prevention.

 

More specifically the students will:

1.Be able to understand the phenomenon of lightning stroke and surge.

2.Be able to apply the appropriate measures in the event of lightning stroke.

3.Be able to carry out inspections of lightning and surge protection installations for compatibility with the applicable regulations.

4.Be able to design and construct lightning and surge protection installations. 

Module Description

 

The theory part of the course consists of the following modules:

1st Module:Introduction to lightning and surge protection: Basic concepts and definitions, legislation related to surge and lightning protection. 

2nd Module:Lightning Phenomenon: Basic physics related to lightning. Lightning stroke. Thermal and electromagnetic effects. Types of strokes and types of harm. Methods of protection for live beings and                                 structures when lightning strokes.

3rd Module:Methods for Design of the Protection of Installations: Lightning stroke risk assessment - risk analysis. Determination of the basic design parameters, quantification. Defining risk zones in a building,                         lightning stroke collection system design.

4rd Module:Equipotential bonds design: Voltage step up increment during lightning stroke and methods of protection. Equipotential connections and structures. Insulating spacers. Earthing systems for surge                         protection facilities.

5th Module:Surge Protection Devices: Surge arresters type I, II, III, type I + II. Surge arresters installation based on the system and device under protection. Lightning stroke collection system - Equipotential                         Bonding - Earthing – Surge Arresters coordination in installations.

6th Module:Lightning and Surge Protection Systems – Case Studies: Lightning and surge protection in typical installations, small, medium, large scale, or event plant size case studies.

 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Evaluation Language : Greek

English for Erasmus students

 

Theory

Final Written Exams: 100%

Individual Project

Final report + presentation : 100%

 

The grade of the course is 

70% x Theory + 30% x Individual project 

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.DEHN, (2007), Lightning Protection Guide, 3rd Edition, Neumarkt

2.Stathopoulos I., (2002), Protection of technical installations against surges, Symeon publications, Athens 

3.Pappas P., (1987), Lightning phenomena and early modern lightning protection, Gold Series Publications, Athens.

4.Kreuger F., (1964), Discharge detection in high – voltage equipment, Heywood, London.

5.Uman M.A., (2008), The art and Science of Lightning protection, Cambridge University Press, New York, USA

6.Cooray V. (Ed.) , (2012), Ligthning Electromagnetics, IET, London, UK

7.Betz H.D., Schumann U., Laroche P.,( Eds), (2009), Lightning: Principle, Instruments and Applications, Springer, Netherlands

8.Hasse P., (2000), Overvoltage Protection of Low-voltage Systems, 2nd Edition, IET, London.

9.Meliopoulos A.P., (2006), Standard Handbook for Electrical Engineers, Section 27, Lightning and Overvoltage Protection, McGraw-Hill, New York, USA  

DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEMS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures and exercises, face-to-face 
Weekly Hours: Lectures, 2 
ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

This course :

•Describes the decision making process 

•Describes the architecture of a decision support system (DSS) 

•Presents the techniques most commonly employed in the construction of decision support systems, and in making decisions with the support of the system. 

•Presents the problems related to decision support systems that are not yet resolved satisfactorily at present and, therefore, are open research areas

 

At the conclusion of this course, student should develop the following capabilities: 

•Ability to select appropriate modelling techniques for supporting semi-structured business decision making 

•Ability to identify and select appropriate decision support systems for generating innovative business solutions 

•Ability to design and implement decision support systems for generating innovative business solutions 

 

At the conclusion of this course, student should be able to: 

•Recognize the relationship between business information needs and decision making 

•Appraise the general nature and range of decision support systems 

•Appraise issues related to the development of DSS 

•Select appropriate modelling techniques 

•Analyse, design and implement a DSS 

Module Description

The core modules of the course include:

 

1.Introduction to Decision making process

2.Decision Making under Certainty and Uncertainty (no use of probabilities and with use of probabilities)

3.Decision Trees Method

4.Linear Programming (LP), LP definition, Linearity requirement

5.Graphical LP solution

6.Simplex method definition, formulating the Simplex model.

7.Linear Programming – Simplex Method for Maximizing.

8.Dynamic Programming

9.Simulation

10.Example Reviewng mixed constraints, example for similar limitations.

11.Review 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final Written examination: 100%

The exams will not be open-book. Final Written Exam includes problem-solving exercises.

Optional job preparation and presentation of up to 20%, less than the proportion of written examination

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Prastakos Gregory “Management Science - operational decisions in the Information Society”, 2006,Editions STAMOULIS (in Greek)

2.Hillier F.S. and G.J. Lieberman (1995), ‘Introduction to Operations Research’, 6th edition, International editions, McGraw-Hill.

3.Ragsdale C.T. (1998), 'Spreadsheet Modelling and Decision Analysis', 2nd edition, South-Western College Publishing.

4.Lectrurer Notes (in Greek & English) 

INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION AND SOCIETY

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures 
Weekly Hours: Lectures, 2 
ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The course aims to familiarize the student with the scientific way of thinking developed by sociological theory, seeking to understand and analyze the economic and social structures that characterize a social formation.  

Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able to:

•reflect and critically approach the reality of modern society that mostly characterizes Western societies and of course Greece, from the industrial revolution up to the 21st century, a time that has been described as post-modern or post-industrial.

•extend the limits of his/her perspective, mature and be able to realize the dialectical relationship of the individual sciences in Political Science.

•correlate and explain facts of today based on political and economic theories but also on incidents of the past.

•criticize and interpret the consequences of today’s industrial production and man's place in the current scene.

•create scenarios for a better future by giving possible solutions to environmental problems. 

Module Description

A.General issues

•Political social systems.

•Political economy

•Socialization.

•Social stratification.

•Social institutions.

•Supranational institutions and the role of Greece.

•Issues of modern society:

      -      Man and Manufacturing.

      -     Environment and Waste.

B. Specific issues

• Waste management and energy recovery

•Environmental design WEEE

•WEEE (recycling of electrical / electronic equipment)      

Assessment Methods and Criteria

I.      Final written exam (60% of the total score)

II.     Bi-annual task (40% of the   total score) 

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Τσαούση Δ. Γ. (2001). Η κοινωνία του ανθρώπου. Αθήνα: Gutenberg

2.Craib Ian (2002). Σύγχρονη Κοινωνική θεωρία. Αθήνα: Ελληνικά Γράμματα

3.Giddens A. (2002). Κοινωνιολογία. Αθήνα: Gutenberg 

SMART ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures and exercises, face-to-face 
Weekly Hours: Lectures, 2 
ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

 

The courses deal with new technologies in the design of smart home and building automation systems. The aim of the course is the in-depth knowledge and critical understanding of the theory and principles of the use of new technologies in the design of smart home and building automation systems.

 

Upon completion of the course, students will have:

 

•Knowledge and skills in modeling, simulation, optimization and design of smart home and building automation systems.

•Knowledge and synthesis skills, construction, programming, maintenance, supervision of operation, debugging and design system repair of smart home and building automation systems.

 

 

Specifically, students will be able to:

•To describe and identify the parts, to choose the functions and operations of a  smart home and building automation system and draw up specifications.

•To explain the operation of a smart home and building automation system and to assess performance.

•Have a proven critical ability so they can compare and evaluate different smart home and building automation systems.

•Perceive, interpret and clearly explain issues related to smart home and building automation systems, to generalize the problem, to correctly appreciate in order to make right conclusions.

•To compose and organize new applications using a smart home and building automation system.

•Implement quality improvement techniques and support smart home and building automation systems. 

•Work with their fellow students, to create and present both at individual and group level a case study from its initial stages up to the final evaluation and finally to be able to propose new ideas and solutions.

Module Description

The core modules of the course include:

 

1.Introduction to home & building automation

2.Protocols for home & building automation

3.Planning a home & building automation project

4.Introduction to KNX

5.System hardware and set up

6.Designing an KNX installation

7.Wiring up the system

8.System integration and program upload

9.More advanced programming and scheduling 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written examination: 100%

Optional job preparation and presentation of up to 20%, less than the proportion of written examination

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Touloglou S. «Structured Cabling & Smart Electrical Installations (ΕΙΒ), Editions ION (in Greek)

2.Touloglou S. «ΕΙΒ/ΚΝΧ for Electrical Installations» , Editions ION (in Greek)

3.Sarris G. «ΕΙΒ/ΚΝΧ. for Electrical Installations Professional», Editions TZIOLAS (in Greek)

4.Sarris G. «EIB/ΚΝΧ: The new Technical Building Electrical Installation in Practice using ΕΤS Professional», Γ. Σαρρής, Editions TZIOLAS (in Greek)

5.http://www.knx.org/ 

6.http://www.abb.gr/ 

7.http://www.dupline.gr/ 

8.Lecturer Notes (in Greek)

RELIABILITY AND QUALITY CONTROL SYSTEMS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures, distance learning methods  
Weekly Hours: Lectures, 2 
ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, students will have:

1.Knowledge of the term reliability and quality.

2.Knowledge of the characteristics and cost of quality and reliability.

3.Ability to implement quality assurance systems in a production line.

4.Ability to develop reliable growth plans.

5.Knowledge of the standards of the series ISO 9000. 

Module Description

THEORY

Quality. Factors affecting quality. Correlation low quality and maintenance. Quality assurance through audits and reliability. Metric quantification of quality. Definition quality, characteristics, quality costs. Data statistics and probabilities. Quality Control System. Quality improvement. Reliability. Total Quality Control. Design experiments in Quality Control. Quality assurance systems. HAACP system. TQM, certifications for quality (ISO 9000, ISO 9001: 2008, EMAS, etc.) Basic systems assurance principles (Generally, reliability indices, general reliability function, probabilistic functions for calculating reliability). Calculation of reliability systems using probability distributions (general, subsystems, discrete Markov chains. Continuous Processes Markov). Application of numerical techniques Markov in complex systems. Approximate calculation of reliability systems. Systems with non exponential distributions. 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Written work &presentation : 100% 

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Tsamis Anastasios , 2014,Management of total Quality, Kritiki,Athens. (Greek)

2.E.Stiakakis ,2010,Management and quality control,Tziola, Athens. (Greek)

3.Dialinas ,2013,Operation Reliability Analysis Of Power Systems, Tsotras,Athens.(Greek)

4.Stefanatos ,2000,Total Quality , EAP,Athens.(Greek)

5.Arvanitopoulos-Kourtis ,ISO 9000:2000,Stamouli,Athens.(Greek)

6.Bank J., The Essence of Total Quality Management, Prentice Hall International UK

7.David J Smith, Reliability, Maintainability and Risk, Butterworth-Heinemann 

DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRIC ENERGY

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery: Lectures 
Weekly Hours: Lectures, 3 
ECTS:
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, students will have:

1.Knowledge of the operating principles and the individual parts of which comprised a distribution of electric energy  system.

2.Knowledge of the basic components of an electric power distribution system.

3.Ability to design the individual components of a power distribution system.

4.Knowledge of the fundamental principles of modeling of the individual components of a power distribution system.

5.Knowledge of control and protection circuits.

6.Knowledge of the power-flow studies

 

More specifically:

1.Be able to understand the operation and detect errors and faults in an electric power distribution system.

2.Have knowledge of the operating and safety testing of an electric power distribution system.

3.Be able to design the individual parts of an electric power distribution system. 

4.Be able to calculate and choose the individual units of an electric power distribution system. 

Module Description

A. THEORY

The theory part of the course consists of the following modules:

1st Module:Introduction-Basic principles  

2nd Module:Parameters of the distribution lines

3rd Module:Power losses computation

4th Module:Distribution transformers

5th Module:Capacitor applications in distribution networks

6th Module:Voltage regulation and protection analysis

7th Module:Medium voltage substations

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Evaluation Language : Greek

Final Written Exams: 100% 

Recommended or required Bibliography

1.Weedy B (2010). Transmission and Distribution of Electric Energy. Giourdas publications, Athens (in Greek)

2.Papadopoulos M (1999). Distribution of Electric Energy. NTUA publications, Athens (in Greek)

3.Malatestas P (2015). Electric Energy Systems. Tziolas publications, Thessaloniki (in Greek)

4.Malatestas P (2014). Distribution of Electric Energy. Tziolas publications, Thessaloniki (in Greek)

5.Arthur R, Vittal V. Power System Analysis. Prentice Hall publications, USA

6.Kersting W (2012), Distribution System Modelling and Analysis. CRC Press publications, USA

7.Gonen T (2014). Electric Power Distribution System Engineering. CRC Press publications, USA

8.Pansini A (1992). Electrical Distribution Engineering. Fairmont Press publications, USA

9.Lakervi E, Holmes E (1989). Electricity Distribution Network Design. Short Run  Press Ltd publications, USA

10.Pabla A (1984).  Electric Power Distribution Systems. McGraw-Hill publications, USA 

8th Semester

INTERNSHIP

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  
Weekly Hours:  
ECTS:  
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

 

Module Description

 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

 

Recommended or required Bibliography

 

THESIS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  
Weekly Hours:  
ECTS:  
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

 

Module Description

 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

 

Recommended or required Bibliography