Course Modules

1st Semester

ADVANCED COMMUNICATIONS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:

• Face to face lectures in class

• E-learning

Weekly Hours:  Lectures: 4, E-learning: 2
ECTS:  9
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course, the students possess advanced knowledge, skills and competences that enable them to:

• calculate the energy, the power and the spectrum of a deterministic signal as well as the power and the power spectral density of a random signal,

• choose the appropriate modulation scheme given the transmission channel characteristics,

• design the optimum receiver for digitally modulated signals in AWGN channels by using a correlation-type or a matched-filter-type demodulator and choosing the detection criterion,

• calculate the probability of error for signal detection in AWGN channels,

• compare the different modulation and demodulation methods with respect to power requirements for achieving specific probability of detection error and the spectrum utilization, 

• analyze linear block codes and convolutional codes,

• process special communication topics based on concepts like multicarrier modulation and OFDM, spread spectrum systems, fading multipath channels and multiple-antenna systems.

Module Description

Lectures

UNIT Ι: Signals and communication systems

1. Elements of a communication system.

2. Mathematical models for communication channels.

3. Energy, power and spectrum of a deterministic signal.

4. Basic concepts of random signals, power spectral density and transmission over LTI systems.

UNIT ΙΙ: Digital modulation schemes

1. Geometric representation of signals.

2. Baseband modulation methods.

3. Passband modulation methods.

4. Digital transmission through bandlimited channels.

UNIT ΙΙΙ: Optimum receivers for AWGN channels 

1. Correlation and matched filter demodulation.

2. Optimum detection criteria.

3. Probability of error for signal detection in AWGN channels.

4. Comparison of modulation methods.

5. Symbol synchronization.

6. Digital modulation with memory.

7. Digital transmission over channels with distortions. 

UNIT IV Channel capacity and channel coding 

1. Channel capacity and communication bounds.

2. Linear block codes.

3. Convolutional codes.

UNIT V: Special communication topics

1. Multicarrier modulation and OFDM.

2. Spread spectrum systems.

3. Fading multipath channels and multiple-antenna systems.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

• Project report / Homework assignments– 20% 

• Midterm exam – 30%

• Final exam – 50% 

Recommended or required Bibliography

Essential reading

1) John Proakis, M. Salehi, “Communication Systems Engineering”, Prentice Hall, 2nd Edition, 2002. ISBN-10: 8120327500, ISBN-13: 978-8120327504.

Recommended Books

1) John Proakis, M. Salehi, “Digital Communications”, McGraw-Hill, 5th Edition, 2008. ISBN-10: 0071263780, ISBN-13: 9780071263788.

2) Simon Haykin, “Digital Communication Systems”, Wiley, 2014. ISBN-10: 0471647357, ISBN-13: 9780471647355.

3) Bernand Sklar, “Digital Communications”, Prentice Hall, 2nd Edition, 2001. ISBN-10: 0130847887, ISBN-13: 9780130847881.

4) Rodger Ziemer, Roger Peterson, ”Introduction to Digital Communication”, Prentice Hall, 2nd Edition, 2001. ISBN-10: 0138964815, ISBN-13: 978-0138964818.

5) Ian Glover, Peter Grant, “Digital Communications”, Prentice Hall, 3rd Edition, 2009. ISBN-10: 0273718304, ISBN-13: 978-0273718307.

6) Athanasios Papoulis, S. Unnikrishna Pillai, “Probability, Random Variables and Stochastic Processes”, McGraw-Hill, 4th Edition, 2002. ISBN10: 0071226613, ISBN-13: 9780071226615.

COMPUTING AND PROGRAMMING TECHNIQUES

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:

• Face to face lectures in class

• E-learning

Weekly Hours:  Lectures: 4, E-learning: 2
ECTS:  9
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course, the students possess advanced knowledge, skills and competences that enable them to:

• Design, create, build and debug Java applications and applets.

• Apply algorithmic thinking to solve programming problems.

• Implement syntax rules in Java programs.

• Explain variables and data types used in program development.

• Apply arithmetic operations for displaying numeric output.

• Write and apply decision structures for determining different operations.

• Write and apply loop structures to perform repetitive tasks.

• Program user-defined methods.

• Identify and implement arrays, array lists and multidimensional arrays.

• Program in Java using object-oriented programming techniques including classes, objects, methods, instance variables, composition, inheritance and polymorphism.

• Program using graphical user interface (GUI) components and Java’s Event Handling Model.

Module Description

This module introduces computer programming using the Java programming language with object-oriented programming principles. Emphasis is placed on event-driven programming methods, including creating and manipulating objects, classes, and using object-oriented tools.

 

UNIT 1

2 x 2h lectures

Introduction to computer programming – Programming languages

Procedural programming, Object-oriented programming, visual programming and tools are presented.

UNIT 2

1 x 2h lectures

 

Introduction to algorithms

An introduction to algorithms, a number of basic algorithms and their complexity estimation are presented

UNIT 3

1 x 2h lectures

Programming environments and tools

A number of programming environments (IDEs) depending on the target system (computer, web, mobile) are discussed

UNIT 4

6 x 2h lectures

Java programming

An introduction to Java programming language, syntax, data types, control structures, operators, and functions are explained.

UNIT 5

6 x 2h lectures

Object-oriented programming in Java

An introduction to object-oriented design and the use of Java classes and objects are explained.

UNIT 6

1 x 2h lectures

Data structures in Java

A number of data structures and their implementation in Java are presented.

UNIT 7

3 x 2h lectures

Exception handling and java GUI

The Java GUI and the use of exception handling are presented.

UNIT 8

2 x 2h lectures

Network programming in Java

Network programming and the use of Java sockets for network programming are presented.

UNIT 9

1 x 2h lectures

Applets

The development of Java applets is presented

UNIT 10

1 x 2h lectures

Introduction to C++, C#

The object-oriented programming languages C++ and C# are presented.

UNIT 11

1 x 2h lectures

Educational visit to a company specializing in mobile apps development.

 

In parallel to lecturing, practice exercises are implemented, aiming at a better understanding and consolidation of the syllabus of the module. In the frame of these exercises, the students are required to submit prototype programs developed individually or in group. 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

• Project report / Homework assignments– 20% 

• Lab practice and report – 30%

• Final exam – 50% 

Recommended or required Bibliography

Recommended Books

1. Harvey Deitel, Paul Deitel , «Java: How to program», 8th edition, 2010.

2. G. Liakeas, “Introduction to Java», 2009. (in greek)

3. Michael Kölling, “Introduction to Programming with Greenfoot. Object-Oriented Programming in Java with Games and Simulations”, Pearson Education, August 2009 

4. Ch. Kitagias, K. Kitagias, G. Prejerakos, D. Kitagias, «Object-oriented programming in Java», 2013 (in greek)

ELECTRONIC DESIGN AND HARDWARE ARCHITECTURES

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:

• Face to face lectures in class

• E-learning

Weekly Hours:  Lectures: 4, E-learning: 2
ECTS:  9
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course, the students possess advanced knowledge, skills and competences that enable them to:

1. Analyze and design digital electronic circuits.

2. Analyze and design analog electronic circuits.

3. Design mixed signal electronic systems.

4. Design electronic systems both at printed circuit board (PCB) level and integrated circuit (IC) level.

5. Recognize and comprehend electronic components’ parameters and characteristics, in the form they are provided in vendors’ datasheets.

6. Choose the appropriate electronic components / ICs depending on the application of interest.

7. Address and solve a variety of practical issues concerning the design of an electronic system.

Module Description

This module deals with advanced topics related to the design of electronic systems both at the printed circuit level, using discrete electronic components, and the integrated circuits level. It is organized in nine (9) teaching units where the subjects related to analog and digital electronics are taught in parallel.

 

UNIT 1

2 x 2h lectures

Introduction – Structure of a Full Electronic System

The introduction to this module determines the subsystems of a full electronic system. A special reference to the particularities of the corresponding subsystems as these result from factors such as the degree of integration that incorporate, the commercial availability of ready subsystem hardware, operating frequencies, sensitivity to noise and signal distortion, operation power, and environmental operating conditions. Finally the targets, the content and organization of the module in teaching units are summarized.

UNIT 2

5 x 2h lectures

Digital electronics design

In unit 2 the basic building blocks of combinational and sequential circuits are initially presented. Analysis of arithmetic units such us adders, subtractors, multipliers and divisors is performed and finally the design of a complete datapath including the control unit and the data storage is introduced. In parallel, the use of VHDL for circuit modeling, simulation and implementation on Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) is introduced.

UNIT 3

3 x 2h lectures

Processor Cores

The third unit presents the core based design methodology, which gives the ability to design complex digital systems on a single chip. Open source and free processor cores and peripherals are presented.

UNIT 4

2 x 2h lectures

Peripherals

In this unit the use of peripheral devices for human and environmental interfaces (e.g., USB, Wi-Fi, Zigbee, memory chips, ADC, display and sensors) is studied and complete application systems are analyzed.

UNIT 5

2 x 2h lectures

System Implementation

In the fifth unit the implementation technologies of digital systems and systems-on-chip are discussed. The features and the pros and cons of alternative methodologies using CPLDs, FPGAs, VLSI Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs) as well as micro-electro-opto-mechanical systems (MOEMS) are examined.

UNIT 6

4 x 2h lectures

Analog Electronics Topologies

The operation of basic topologies of analog electronic stages / building blocks, which are used either at the level of circuit implementation by discrete components or at the level of integrated circuits is analyzed in unit 6. Finally, the composition of a full operational amplifier and a full audio frequencies amplifier employing the analyzed building blocks are presented.

UNIT 7

4 x 2h lectures

Operational Amplifiers

Unit 7 is dedicated to operational amplifiers (OpAmps) and their applications. First, the theory of operation of both the ideal and the real OpAmp is presented and different OpAmp architectures are compared, while a familiarization to the basic OpAmp parameters / characteristics in the form they are provided in vendors’ datasheets is pursued. Then, OpAmp circuits and applications are studied, focusing on both their theory of operation and practical design issues.

UNIT 8

2 x 2h lectures

Analog to Digital and Digital to Analog Conversion (ADC-DAC)

In unit 8, the signal conversions from analog to digital (ADC) and from digital to analog (DAC) are studied. The main ADC and DAC architectures are presented; their performances are compared while selection criteria on application basis are discussed. A familiarization to the basic ADC/DAC parameters / characteristics in the form they are provided in vendors’ datasheets is pursued.

UNIT 9

2 x 2h lectures

PCB Level Mixed Signal Electronic Systems Design Principles

The principles for a successful design of a mixed (both analog and digital) signal electronic system at PCB level, which includes many different subsystems (power, low level analog signal, high speed digital and radio frequencies (RF) electronics) are reviewed in unit 9.

In parallel to lecturing, practice and / or laboratory exercises, for both analog and digital electronic circuits are implemented, aiming at a better understanding and consolidation of the syllabus of the module. In the frame of these exercises, the students are required to submit individual or group reports and / or prototype circuits. A visit to an electronics laboratory or a hardware design industry is also organized.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

• Homework, Practice Sessions, Participation (40%)

• Final exam (60%) 

Recommended or required Bibliography

-Essential reading

1. SEDRA, A.S. and K. C. SMITH, Microelectronic Circuits, 6th Edition, Oxford University Press, 2009, ISBN-13 978-0195323030

2. PAUL R. GRAY, PAUL J. HURST, S. H. LEWIS, ROBERT G. MEYER, Analysis and Design of Analog Integrated Circuits, 5th Edition, ISBN-13: 978-0470245996

3. CLAYTON G. and WINDER S., Operational Amplifiers, 5th Edition, ISBN-13: 978-0750659147

4. KESTER W. (Ed.), The Data Conversion Handbook, ISBN-13: 978-0750678414

5. Lecture Notes provided by the instructors, (in Greek)

6. MORRIS MANO, M., CILETTI, M., Digital Design, 5/E, 2013, Prentice Hall  

7. BROWN, ST., VRANESIC, Z., Fundamentals of Digital Logic with VHDL Design, 3rd EDITION, 2009, McGraw Hill.

8. KLEITZ W., Digital Electronics: A Practical Approach with VHDL, 9/E, 2012, Prentice Hall

9. MORRIS MANO, M., and KIME, C.R., Logic and Computer Design Fundamentals, Pearson Education, 4/e, 2008

10. GAJSKI D.D., Principles of Digital Design, Prentice Hall; 1/e, 1996.

-Recommended Books

1. HOROWITZ P., HILL W., The Art of Electronics, Cambridge University Press, 2006

2. FRANCO S., Design with Operational Amplifiers and Analog Integrated Circuits, 4th Edition, McGraw-Hill Science/Engineering/Math, 2014, ISBN-13: 978-0078028168

3. FLEEMAN S., Electronic Devices: Discrete and Integrated, Prentice Hall, 1990, ISBN-13: 978-0133381207

-Relevant Journals:

1. IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems I, II

2. IEEE Transactions on Consumer Electronics

3. IEEE Transactions on Computer-Aided Design of Integrated Circuits and Systems

4. IEEE Transactions on Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) Systems

5. IEEE Embedded Systems Letters

ELECTROMAGNETIC COMPATIBILITY, SAFETY AND QUALITY

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Face to face lectures in class
Weekly Hours:  Lectures: 2
ECTS:  3
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course, the students possess advanced knowledge, skills and competences that enable them to:

• Know, understand, state and explain the basic EMC standards; 

• Appreciate and discuss the role of EMC standards and ergonomics for the safety and health of users of manufactured products and the wider usefulness in various aspects of the economy and everyday life (e.g. Industry, Transportation, Medical, Consumer electronics, etc.) 

• Apply taught methods and develop new methods of the solution of interference problems;

• Plan procedures that meet the requirements of electromagnetic compatibility (EMC);

• Apply the EMC and testing regulations and standards at given real-life problems; select the appropriate standards and procedures;

• Perform electromagnetic radiation field measurements using specialized equipment; 

• Know, name, classify and explain shielding and immunity techniques; 

• State the basic principles of EMC testing and design; 

• Design EMC compatible circuits and systems. 

Module Description

Presentation and analysis EMC standards for the safety and ergonomics of manufactured products. For this purpose, topics covered include: 

• Electromagnetic Compatibility

• Basic Greek legislation currently governing the new EMC Directive 2004/108 / EK

• The harmonized standards

• The penalties provided for offenders and

• Ergonomics such as:

- Definition - Etymology

- Fields of Ergonomics

- Physical Ergonomics

- Cognitive Ergonomics

- Organizational Ergonomics

Lectures:

Introduction in Quality (1 x 2-hour lectures)

Overview of the concept of quality and basic programming stages, with reference to existing standards.

Total Quality Management (3 x 2-hour lectures)

TQM is applied at all levels of a company, organization or educational institution and expresses its relation with students, suppliers, human resources and the exchange of information within and outside of the Institute.

The EMC standards (2 x 2-hour lectures)

General overview of the EMC standards.

Description of requirements of EMC standards (2 x 2-hour lectures) 

The EMC system is analyzed, its importance and requirements are explained and the conditions for its development are referred to.

Application instructions (2 x 2-hour lectures)

This Section answers all the questions on the standard and it is essential in order to clarify some of the most important issues related to the implementation of the new Directive for Electromagnetic Compatibility in our country.

Ergonomics (2 x 2-hour lectures)

This section introduces the term ergonomics and analyzes areas such as physical ergonomics, cognitive ergonomics, Organizational ergonomics etc.

Conclusions (1 x 2-hour lectures)

The last section focuses on why a company should implement the EMC system, reports on the main implementation problems and advantages

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Students will be assessed in this course based on 

• an oral grade based on participation in class and homework assignments / project reports (30%)

• the midterm written test (35%) 

• the final written test (35%)

Recommended or required Bibliography

-Recommended Books

1. Kapsalis Christos, Trakadas Panayiotis, Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC), Tziolas Eds., Thessaloniki, Greece, ISBN10: 9604180932, ISBN13: 9789604180936 (in greek)

2. Chatterton, Paul A., Houlden, Michael A., Electromagnetic Compatibility EMC, Tziolas Eds., Thessaloniki, Greece, ISBN10: 9608050383, ISBN13: 9789608050389 (in english & translated in greek)

3. Lambros Laios, Maria Giannakopoulou-Sioutari, Synchroni Ergonomia, Papasotiriou Eds., Athens, Greece, 2003, ISBN: 978-960-7530-44-8 (in greek).

 

-Useful links / information in regards to electromagnetic compatibility 

1. European Commission: http://ec.europa.eu/enterprise/electr_equipment/emc/index.htm 

2. Guide for electromagnetic compatability according to Directive 2004/108/ΕΚ: 

http://ec.europa.eu/enterprise/electr_equipment/emc/guides/emcguide_may2007.pdf 

3. Published harmonized standards in the field of electromagnetic compatability: 

http://ec.europa.eu/enterprise/newapproach/standardization/harmstds/reflist/emc.html 

4. Notified bodies in field of electromagnetic compatibility: http://ec.europa.eu/enterprise/newapproach/nando/index.cfm?fuseaction=directive.notifiedbody&dir_

id=129141&type_dir=NO%20CPD&pro_id=99999&prc_id=99999&ann_id=99999&prc_anx=99999

5. Contact points catalogue for electromagnetic compatibility: 

http://ec.europa.eu/enterprise/electr_equipment/emc/contactpoints.htm

2nd Semester

AUDIO, VIDEO AND BROADCASTING TECHNOLOGY

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:

• Face to face lectures in class

• E-learning

Weekly Hours:  Lectures: 4, E-learning: 2
ECTS:  9
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The objective of this course module is to provide the students with an introductory coverage of a wide scientific field, covering audio, video and broadcasting technologies.

Upon successful completion of this course, the students possess advanced knowledge, skills and competences that enable them to:

1. Know and explain orally and by drawing diagrams the notions of sound and sound waves; understand and explain the phenomena governing the acoustics of open areas and rooms and design key parameters of the acoustic behavior of the second ones.

2. Understand the principles of physiological acoustics and psychoacoustics, as well as the perception of sound by humans.

3. Recognize and comprehend the role of the structural elements of electroacoustic recording and playback chain.

4. Use laboratory grade microphones and appropriate measuring instruments to conduct applied acoustics and electroacoustic systems' measurements.

5. Choose electroacoustic actuators and sensors, depending on the application, as well as design loudspeakers.

6. Design electroacoustic installations / public address systems.

7. Know basic concepts of image and video signals as well as the characteristics which are exploited for their processing.

8. Understand the basics of moving picture perception.

9. Recognize and comprehend the role and the impact of each digitization component on signal fidelity.

10. Be in position to conduct audio, image and video processing using appropriate software.

11. Design video and audio reception and distribution installations.

Module Description

This module focuses on the presentation of advanced topics related to the technology and applications of sound and image in telecommunications, entertainment and art. It is organized in eight (8) teaching units.

 

UNIT 1

3 x 2h lectures

Introduction – Audio and Image/Video

In this introductory unit, a presentation of the topics covered by the specific module is provided by relating audio and image/video with everyday applications in the fields of telecommunications, entertainment and art. Specifically, the background that is necessary, for an engineer dealing with sound and image, to build in order to cope with contemporary technological applications of the specific sector of electronics is discussed. Finally the targets, the content and organization of the module in teaching units are summarized.

UNIT 2

3 x 2h lectures

Sound: production, propagation, measurable quantities.

In the second unit, the notion of sound as a mechanical spatiotemporal variation is introduced, while practical solution of wave equations for typical sound wave cases is performed. Moreover, topics concerning sound production (sound sources, source directivity), sound propagation in open areas (with emphasis on propagation in the atmosphere), as well as sound observables (measurable quantities) are studied. Finally, special topics on the study (with reference to available software tools) and legislation concerning acoustic noise in open areas are presented.

UNIT 3

3 x 2h lectures

Room acoustics and introduction to physiological acoustics and psychoacoustics.

Sound propagation in small and large rooms is analyzed in unit 3 through the wave, geometrical and statistic study of sound field deployment. Characteristic quantities defining the quality of speech and music reproduction in closed areas (rooms) are defined in close relation to the human perception of sound (physiological acoustics/ psychoacoustics). Finally, software tools for room acoustics simulation are presented.

UNIT 4

4 x 2h lectures

Electroacoustic systems

The fourth unit deals with the complete electroacoustic recording and playback chain, the analysis of its structural elements, the electroacoustic systems’ measurements and the design of electroacoustic installations / public address systems. In more detail, after the presentation of the structural elements of the electroacoustic chain, the modeling, structure and operation of actuators (speakers) and sensors (microphones) is analyzed. Emphasis is placed on loudspeaker systems and electroacoustic measurements. Finally, the electronic elements of the reproduction chain are presented and examples of electroacoustic installations’ / public address systems’ designs are provided.

UNIT 5

3 x 2h lectures

Basic concepts of images and video

In the fifth unit the concept of the three-dimensional image signal in terms of brightness and color space is introduced. A brief overview of the analog television technology with emphasis on synchronization features, analysis, interlaced image, color coding standards and television signal transmission standards is given. An analysis of the video signal characteristics such as correlation and the information content as well as details of the properties of the video signal perception, such as spatial and temporal masking concludes the unit.

UNIT 6

3 x 2h lectures

Digitization and Digital Processing of Sound and Images

The sixth unit begins asserting the requirements that led to the use of digital technology in the area of audiovisual systems. After a brief reference to fundamental concepts of digital signals, the commonly used audio, image and video digitization standards are presented. Digital processing of audio and video signals in the time domain (eg averaging, contrast, luminosity) is introduced, followed by a presentation of the frequency domain analysis of signals, digital filters of finite and infinite impulse response and their use in sound and image processing.

UNIT 7

4 x 2h lectures

Audio and Video Compression

In the seventh unit strategies for the compression of audio and video signals are introduced. The unit begins with prediction encoding, which refers to entropy coding and motion compensation, refers to transformations in the frequency domain (Fourier, DCT), and proceeds with emphasis on audio signals on perceptual coding (psychoacoustics, subband filters, implementation of cosine modulation filters). The section closes with a presentation of the MPEG1 and MPEG2 standards for audio and video signals and with a reference to the MPEG4 standard.

UNIT 8

3 x 2h lectures

Audio and Video Digital Transmission

The eighth unit introduces transmission fundamentals such as channel characteristics, configuration, equalization and channel coding, and propagation model. The digital terrestrial video broadcasting (DVB-T) standard is analyzed, emphasizing on the modulation, coding and channel capacity. The single frequency terrestrial networks (SFN) technology, the assignment of channels / network planning, spectrum usage and adjacent interference (eg LTE) are highlighted. The unit concludes with references to mobile broadcasting standards (DVB-H) and transmission over IP networks.

 

In parallel with lecturing, practice and / or laboratory exercises are conducted either using real instruments or in a simulated environment, using analysis tools for audio, video and transmitted signals. A visit to a modern digital studio is organized in order to highlight the use of digital media for the production / processing / storage and transmission of audiovisual signals.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

• Homework assignments / project report (30%)

• Lab practice and class participation (20%)

• Final written exam (50%)

Recommended or required Bibliography

-Essential reading

1. SKARLATOS D., Applied Acoustics, Gotsis Publications ISBN-13: 978-9608771017 (in Greek).

2. BERANEK L., MELLOW T., Acoustics: Sound Fields and Transducers, Academic Press, 2012, ISBN-13: 978-0123914217.

3. KLEINER M., Electroacoustics, CRC Press, 2013, ISBN-13: 978-1439836187.

4. ALTON EVEREST F., POHLMANN K. C., Master Handbook of Acoustics, McGraw-Hill/TAB Electronics, 2009, ISBN-13: 978-0071603324

5. ROSSING T. D., DUNN F. (ed.): Springer Handbook of Acoustics, Springer; 2nd Edition 2014, ISBN-13: 978-1493907540.

6. COLLOMS M., High Performance Loudspeakers, 6th Ed., ISBN-13: 978-0470094303

7. BENOIT, H., Digital Television. Satellite, Cable, Terrestrial, IPTV, Mobile TV in the DVB Framework, Taylor & Francis Ltd 

8. Digital Television, Elsevier Science & Technology, ISBN: 978-024-051-695-0

9. Digital Video Broadcasting, Springer-Verlag Berlin and Heidelberg GmbH & Co. KG, ISBN: 978-354-060-946-9

10. Lecture Notes provided by the instructors.

-Recommended Books

1. OLSON H. F., MASSA F., Applied Acoustics, Literary Licensing, LLC, 2013, ISBN-13: 978-1258824280.

2. BERANEK L., Acoustics, Amer Inst of Physics; Rev Sub edition, 1986, ISBN-13: 978-0883184943.

3. BALLOU G., Electroacoustic Devices: Microphones and Loudspeakers, Focal Press, 2009, ISBN-13: 978-0240812670.

4. ALTEN S. R., Recording and Producing Audio for Media, Cengage Learning PTR, 2011, ISBN-13: 978-1435460652

5. FAHY F. J., Foundations of Engineering Acoustics, Academic Press, 2000, ISBN-13: 978-0122476655.

6. DAVID EGAN M., Architectural Acoustics, J. Ross Publishing Classics, 2007, ISBN-13: 978-1932159783.

7. DVB The Family of International Standards for Digital Video Broadcasting, Springer-Verlag Berlin and Heidelberg GmbH & Co. KG, ISBN: 978-354-043-545-7

8. FISCHER, W., Digital Video and Audio Broadcasting Technology, Springer-Verlag Berlin and Heidelberg GmbH & Co. KG, ISBN: 978-354-076-357-4

-Relevant Journals:

1. Journal of the Audio Engineering Society

2. Applied Acoustics

3. Acta Acustica united with Acustica

4. Signal Processing

5. Digital Signal Processing

6. IEEE Transactions on Audio, Speech, and Language Processing

7. IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems for Video Technology

EMBEDDED SYSTEMS - REAL TIME SOFTWARE

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:

• Face to face lectures in class

• E-learning

Weekly Hours:  Lectures: 4, E-learning: 2
ECTS:  9
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

The objective of this course module is to provide the students with an introductory coverage of a wide scientific field, covering audio, video and broadcasting technologies.

Upon successful completion of this course, the students possess advanced knowledge, skills and competences that enable them to:

1. Design and develop the hardware and software components of an embedded system, 

2. Make use of the enabling technologies for implementing embedded systems with emphasis on Microcontrollers from various vendors and the techniques for programming their integrated peripherals using IDE programming tools in high level languages as C,

3. Apply contemporary techniques for Hardware-Software co-design of embedded systems for Real time applications using RTOS, 

4. Understand the interdisciplinary nature of various application fields of Embedded Systems, 

5. Design and implement an embedded system of their choice as a final project.

Module Description

Lectures:

UNIT Ι: Introduction – Embedded Systems

Introduction to Embedded Systems and the important metrics for design their hardware-software components. Examples for typical Embedded systems design with emphasis on Wireless Sensor Network and RFID applications

UNIT ΙΙ: Implementation Technologies for Embedded Systems

Contemporary technologies for Embedded systems implementation with analysis of their comparative advantages. Modern Microcontrollers with emphasis on ARM and MSP430 MCUs. Metrics for MCU selection according to the Embedded System requirements.

UNIT ΙΙΙ: Microcontrollers Programming techniques for Embedded systems development

Basic programming techniques for Microcontrollers based on C language. Introduction to the Integrated peripherals of Microcontrollers and the programming model followed using an Integrated Development Environment. MCU programming in practice for simple embedded systems.

UNIT IV: Real Time Operating Systems –Open Source RTOS 

Real Time Operation Systems basic principles and concepts for embedded systems. Presentation of the Interrupt mechanisms and an in-depth presentation of programming interrupt handlers. Introduction to the MCU low-power modes of operation and usage with interrupt mechanisms for embedded systems implementation.

UNIT V: Embedded Systems Example 1 – Wireless Sensor Networking for Lighting Applications

Analysis of a Wireless Sensor Network node as a typical example of an Embedded System. Presentation of the various levels of abstraction used concerning the hardware and software components, as well as, the communication protocols employed from the physical to the application level. Laboratory examples for LED lighting control based on WSNs. 

UNIT VI: Embedded Systems Example 2 – Implementation of an autonomous vehicle 

A project focused on the development of a small scale autonomous vehicle (UGV) or UAV is realized based on the embedded system design techniques presented.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final course grade = 

35% x Assignments +Class/Lab participation 

20%x Mid-term exam

20% x (Group) Project Report 

25% x Final written exam

 

Expected participation in learning activities: 

Students are expected to 

1. participate in all lectures, practice sessions / laboratories and other learning activities planned for the specific semester (invited talks),

2. complete a project for the design and development of an embedded system assigned by the instructor and related to the course contents, either independently or in groups, and submit a technical report on the results by the end of the semester,

3. participate to the course final written exam. The exam covers all taught material. Students must prove mastery of the material taught and the tools used.

Recommended or required Bibliography

- Essential reading

1. Wayne Wolf, Computers as Components: Principles of Embedded Computing System Design 

2. Steve Heath, Embedded Systems Design

3. John H. Davies, MSP430 Microcontroller Basics, NEWNES-ELSEVIER, ISBN: 978-0-7506-8276-3

4. Gadre, D. V., Programming and Customizing the AVR Microcontroller, Tziolas Publications (translated into Greek).

5. Jane Liu, Real-Time Systems

6. Bryant, O’Hallaron, Computer Systems – A Programmer’s Perspective

7. Ben Ari, Principles of Concurrent and Distributed Programming

-Recommended Material

1. Silberschatz, Galvin & Gagne, Operating Systems Concepts, Chapters 4 (Processes), 6 (Scheduling), 7 (Process Synchronization) and 8 (Deadlocks)

2. Andrew Tanenbaum, Modern Operating Systems, Chapters 2 and 3

3. MSP430 Datasheets 

4. ARM Datasheets

5. Datasheets for MSP430 and ARM development boards

6. Intel XScale development boards

-Relevant Journals:

1. Design Automation for Embedded Systems

2. Eurasip Journal of Embedded Systems

3. IEEE Embedded Systems Letters

4. International Journal of Embedded and Real-Time Communication Systems

5. International Journal of Embedded Systems

MOBILE – PERVASIVE COMPUTING AND APPLICATIONS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:

• Face to face lectures in class

• E-learning

Weekly Hours:

 Lectures: 4, E-learning: 2

ECTS:  9
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course, the students possess advanced knowledge, skills and competences that enable them to:

1. Know, name and describe the different application development platforms for mobile and wearable devices and the particularities of programming context- and situation-aware applications.

2. Understand, explain and discuss the limitations in application programming for mobile devices in terms of processing power, memory and battery power.

3. Design applications for mobile and wearable devices, taking into account the limitations introduced by the nature of these devices.

4. Use tools such as App Inventor Develop for application programming.

5. Implement applications through the use of SDKs such as the Android SDK and the IOS SDK

6. Evaluate and relatively assess new technologies in the field of mobile computing and communications.

7. Plan and efficiently use mobile, pervasive computing and web technologies in order to meet the needs of mobile applications. 

Module Description

Lectures

1 2 X 2  hours of lectures: Review of basic concepts and principles in programming 

Quick review of basic principles of object oriented programming, using Java as a programming language. Presentation of topics in mobile and pervasive computing, context and situation awareness, PAN communications and platforms for mobile apps development.

2 3 X 2 hours of lectures including lab:  Introduction to the App Inventor platform and to event-handling.

Introduction to App Inventor, installation, creation of a Portfolio, development of a first, simple application, presentation of testing and debugging environment.

3 3 X 2 hours of lectures including lab: Use of parameters, event control, graphics, video and gaming.

Introduction to timing, video, moving graphics and sprites making use of events control, use of variables and control statements. 

4 3 X 2 hours of lectures including lab:Use of mobile and wearable devices context and situation awareness, and message exchange.

Introduction to SMS communication, location identification through the use of GPS, text to speech transformation and access to network services.  

5 3 X 2 hours of lectures including lab:  Data and information management for the implementation of news services.

Introduction to lists, pointers, static and dynamic data, web APIs and asynchronous communication.

6 2 X 2 hours of lectures including lab:  Procedures. 

Procedures, development and reuse.

7 2 X 2 hours of lectures including lab:  User Data and generation and use. 

User data generation, collection and use over the mobile devices and the web. 

8 2 X 2 hours of lectures including lab:  Design and architecture of applications, testing and debugging.

Design of mobile applications, implementation and calling of procedures, reuse of code, testing and debugging

9 2 X 2 hours of lectures:  Mobile apps development platforms.

Presentation of free, commercial and research platforms for mobile application development supporting real time operation, context and situation awareness and unifed network access. 

10 3 X 2 hours of lectures:  Programming mobile devices in Java

Presentation of tools and platforms (Eclipse, IOS SDK, Android SDK, Android ADT, JDK), moving from App Inventor to Java-Eclipse

11 1 X 2 hours (presentation): Educational visit

Educational visit to a company specializing in mobile apps development.

 

In parallel to the lectures, lab practice and assignments are given in order to provide hands-on experience on the design and development of prototypes, testing and debugging and publishing of mobile applications. 

During the semester, a visit to a company that specializes in the design and implementation of mobile applications and tools is organized.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Assessment is based on: 

• intermediate reports and small projects (individual assignments) assigned during the semester, contributing 50% at the final grade,

• a final project (group of up to two students), due at the end of the semester, contributing 50% at the final grade.

Recommended or required Bibliography

-Recommended Books

1. Paul Deitel, Harvey Deitel, Abbey Deitel, Android for Programmers: An App-Driven Approach, Prentice Hall, 2013

2. David Wolber, Hal Abelson, Ellen Spertus, Liz Looney, Αpp Inventor 2, O'Reilly Media, 2014

3. Kevin J McNeish, Greg Lee, Benjamin J Miller, Sharlene M McNeish, Diving In - iOS App Development for Non-Programmers Series: The Series on How to Create iPhone & iPad Apps, Oak Leaf Enterprises 2012

WIRELESS AND OPTICAL COMMUNICATIONS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:

• Face to face lectures in class

• E-learning

Weekly Hours:  Lectures: 4, E-learning: 2
ECTS:  9
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course, the students possess advanced knowledge, skills and competences that enable them to:

(In relation to the field of Wireless Communications:)

• Describe the basic wireless propagation mechanisms and explain the relevant signal attenuation and/or distortion phenomena.

• Apply design and measurement rules for the basic types of wireless communication air channels.

• Analyze and perform calculations with respect to the operational and performance characteristics of the digital modulation and channel coding techniques used in wireless communications. 

• Describe the operational principles of the spread spectrum, OFDM and MIMO techniques as well as perform basic calculations regarding their operation and performance. 

• Describe the Physical layer specifications of modern wireless communication networks.

(In relation to the field of Optical Communications:) 

• Understand, state and explain the basics of the optical network components (optical sources, fibers, receivers, etc.).

• Understand, explain by drawing diagrams and be able to analyze and design basic optical fiber network topologies (point to point, ring, star and bus).

• Know and explain by drawing diagrams the characteristics and operation principles of WDM technology. 

• Analyze specifications and design an optical WDM network topology.

• Understand, state and explain the basic principles of control and management of an optical network.

• Understand and explain by drawing diagrams the passive optical network technologies (PON); be able to design an access network with specific optical components.

Module Description

The wireless communication course part deals with advanced topics concerning the wireless propagation phenomena and the relevant channel modeling as well as topics dealing with the transmission and channel coding techniques implemented on the air interface of modern wireless communication networks. In this context, the following topics are covered:

·           Electromagnetic wave propagation mechanisms: free space propagation, reflection and transmission at media boundaries, diffraction, scattering.

·           Wireless Propagation Phenomena:

·           Atmospheric Phenomena: atmospheric refraction, attenuation due to rain and atmospheric gases.

·           Ground Phenomena: shadowing and multipath fading.

·           Modeling and design of specific radio links: a) Terrestrial Line of sight Links, b) Earth Space Satellite Links, c) Terrestrial Land Mobile Cellular Links, d) Indoor Wireless Communication Links.

·           Digital modulation and channel coding for error detection and correction.

·           Spread Spectrum, OFDM and ΜΙΜΟ transmission techniques.

·           Modern Radio Access Networks (RAN):

o    Cellular 3G-4G-5G RANs

o    IEEE 802.16/WiMAX RANs

o    IEEE 802.11/WiFi RANs

o    IEEE 802.15/WPAN RANs

The optical communications part covers design and operation aspects of local area networks and backbone high capacity networks. The following topics are covered:

·         Optical fibers and components

·         Basics of wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) optical networks

·         Design of WDM optical networks

·         Control and management of optical networks

·         Access networks and passive optical networks

 

In particular, the course module lectures are organized in ten (10) teaching units where the parts related to wireless and optical communications are taught in parallel.

 

The Wireless Communication part is organized in five (5) topics:

Unit 1

3 x 2h Lectures

Electromagnetic wave propagation mechanisms

Free space propagation, propagation through reflection or transmission at media boundaries as well as propagation through diffraction and scattering is analyzed. Furthermore, atmospheric phenomena including atmospheric refraction and the consequences regarding line of sight as well as rain and gas attenuation and their role in link budget calculations are discussed. Finally, shadowing and multipath fading phenomena are discussed and with emphasis on the relevant calculations.

Unit 2

3 x 2h Lectures

Radio Link Modeling and Design

This teaching unit deals with the combined presence of different propagation phenomena for the following types of radio links: a) Terrestrial Line of sight Links, b) Earth Space Satellite Links, c) Terrestrial Land Mobile Cellular Links, d) Indoor Wireless Communication Links. Emphasis is given on the different installation choices, the link budget calculations as well as on the availability/coverage calculations for each of the aforementioned radio link types.

Unit 3

3 x 2h Lectures

Digital Modulation and Coding Techniques for Error Correction

Teaching Unit 3 presents the baseband transmission techniques that are used in wireless communications. In particular, digital modulation techniques such as FSK, PSK and QAM are discussed. Furthermore, the basic operation principles of the block and convolutional error detection and correction techniques are presented.

Unit 4

3 x 2h Lectures

Spread Spectrum, OFDM and ΜΙΜΟ transmission techniques

Spread Spectrum (Frequency Hopping and Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum) OFDM and ΜΙΜΟ transmission techniques are discussed as technical solutions aiming to improve wireless communication channel capacity and performance.

Unit 5

2 x 2h Lectures

Modern Radio Access Networks (RAN)

In this teaching unit the specific combination of techniques that essentially implement the physical layer on the air interface of the modern radio access networks is discussed. In this context the following types of RANs are examined: a) Cellular 3G-4G-5G RANs, b) IEEE 802.16/WiMAX RANs, c) IEEE 802.11/WiFi RANs και d) IEEE 802.15/WPAN RANs.

 

The optical communications part is divided in five (5) topics:

Unit 1

4 x 2-h lectures

Optical fibers and optical network components

A detailed review of the basic optical network components. Specifically, the courses focus on the characteristics of optical fibers, laser sources and receivers, as well as the other components like optical filters, modulators, optical fiber-amplifiers, multiplexers and demultiplexers, etc.

Unit 2

2 x 2-h lectures

Basics of wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) optical networks

Analysis of characteristics and implementation of wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) network topologies. Classic (coarse) and advanced (dense) multiplexing as well as the corresponding components for interconnection and data add/drop (OADM).

Unit 3

1 x 2-h lectures

Design of WDM optical networks

Design of wavelength routing networks. Dimensioning and study of various topologies.

Unit 4

1 x 2-h lectures

Control and management of optical networks

Network management functions. Optical layer services and interfacing. Layers within the optical layer. Network survivability.

Unit 5

2 x 2-h lectures

Access networks and passive optical networks

Principles of access networks with focus on passive optical networks (PONs) and FFTx applications.

 

Along with the theory lectures, students attend practice sessions in the lab.

The wireless communication exercises include: α) simulation models and laboratory measurements relevant to electromagnetic wave propagation phenomena, b) Simulation of transmission and channel coding techniques (digital modulation, Forward Error Correction, Spread Spectrum and OFDM transmission techniques) and c) radio measurements in cellular radio access networks (3G-4G coverage and voice/data service measurements).

In the optical communications part, a commercial software simulator for optical links is used. Furthermore, students familiarize and practice in optical fiber handling and measurements (fiber splicing, OTDR measurements).

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Student performance will be evaluated through:

• Interim written examination on the theoretical part.

• Final written examination on the theoretical part.

• Combination of oral examination and class presence with project report. 

• Laboratory skills.

Recommended or required Bibliography

-Recommended Books

Wireless Communication Part

1. Molisch, A., Wireless Communications, 2nd Ed, Willey, 2010.

2. Rappaport, T.S., Wireless Communications: Principles & Practice, 2nd Ed. Prentice Hall, 2010.

3. Bertoni, H.L., Radio Propagation for Modern Wireless Systems, Prentice Hall, 2000.

4. Saunders, S. R., Antennas and Propagation for Wireless Communication Systems, John Wiley & Sons, 1999.

5. Tse D. and Viswanath P., Fundamentals of Wireless Communications, Cambridge University Press, 2005.

6. Prasad, R., OFDM for Wireless Communications Systems, Artech House, 2004.

 

Optical Communications Part

1. RAMASWAMI, R. and SIVARAJAN, K., Optical Network, Elsevier 2002.

2. GREEN, P., Optical Fiber Networks, Papasotiriou 1994.   

3. AGRAWAL, G.P. Optical Fiber Communication Systems, Tziolas 1997.

4. GOWAR, J., Optical communication systems, Prentice Hall 1993. 

5. PALAIS, J.C., Fiber optics communications Prentice Hall 2005.

RF ELECTRONICS AND ANTENNAS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:

• Face to face lectures in class

• E-learning

Weekly Hours:  Lectures: 4, E-learning: 2
ECTS:  9
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course, the students possess advanced knowledge, skills and competences that enable them to:

• Quote the basic subsystems of an RF transmitter and receiver communications system and describe by drawing diagrams

• Describe the functionality of and design RF filters

• Describe the functionality of and design low noise and power amplifiers / design low noise amplifiers using PCB technology

• Describe the functionality of an RF oscillator, a frequency up and down frequency converter, and design a frequency converter using PCB technology

• Describe the functionality of antenna systems and match antenna loads to transmitter and receiver components

• Design and develop an RF transmitter or receiver component including an analog filter, a low noise amplifier and a frequency down-converter.

Module Description

This module aims at presenting the state-of-the-art in design and development of RF electronic systems and transmitting or receiving antennas. In this context, we present the basic-most subsystems of RF transceivers, including frequency converters, amplifiers, filters and antennas. In parallel, after a brief transmission line theoretical framework, basic RF electronic design principles are being taught. Finally, antenna radiation mechanisms are introduced and studied from a component-equivalent point of view. 

The following units are covered in this module:

• RF transceivers 

• RF filters 

• Low-noise and power amplifiers

• RF oscillators

• Mixers, frequency up and down converters 

• Antennas

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Student performance is evaluated by:

• Interim written examination (20%)

• Final written examination (40%)

• Performance in practice sessions / lab skills (20%)

• Homework assignments / Reports (20%)

Recommended or required Bibliography

-Recommended Books

1. Balanis, C. A., Antenna Theory: Analysis and Design, Wiley-Interscience, 2005. 

2. Balanis, C. A., Advanced Engineering Electromagnetics, Wiley, 2012. 

3. Maas, S. A., Microwave Mixers, Artech House, 1993. 

4. Razavi, B., RF Microelectronics, Prentice Hall, 2011. 

5. Reinhold, L., and Bogdanov, G., RF Circuit Design: Theory and Applications, Prentice Hall, 2008.

6. Sedra, A. S., and Smith, K. C., Microelectronic Circuits, Oxford University Press, 2009. 

7. Van de Roer, T. G., Microwave Electronic Devices, Chapman and Hall, London, UK, 1995.

 

-Relevant Journals:

1. IEEE Transactions on Microwave Theory and Techniques / IEEE Microwaves Theory and Techniques Letters

2. IEEE Transactions on Antennas and Propagation / IEEE Antennas and Propagation Magazine / IEEE Antennas and Propagation Letters

3. Microwave and Optical Technology Letters

SENSORS AND MICRONETS (BAN, PAN, LAN)

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:

• Face to face lectures in class

• E-learning

Weekly Hours:  Lectures: 4, E-learning: 2
ECTS:  9
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course, the students possess advanced knowledge, skills and competences that enable them to:

• Know, understand, explain and discuss the role of sensors in the field of Electronics and their usefulness in various aspects of the economy and every-day life (e.g. Industry, Transportation, Medicine, Commercial Electronics, etc);

• Know, understand, name and classify the various types of modern and innovative applications of Sensors;

• Know, understand, explain by drawing diagrams and distinguish among the various types modern sensor system technologies;

• State and describe in detail using diagrams the implementation of a sensor system such as Micromechanics and the modern methods of implementing electronic devices; 

• Know, understand, name and classify innovative networks for the transmission and exchange of sensor data; classify according to specs, protocol, range and autonomy; discuss relative merits and select appropriate architectures for given problems;

• Design and simulate sensor networks using software tools. 

Module Description

The course presents modern sensors as well as modern and innovative implementation fields. The course covers the following topics:

·         Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems & Micro-Optο-Electro-Mechanical-Systems

·         Electronic circuits connected to sensors and digital (wired and wireless) transmission of the collected data

·         Wireless networks of sensors (BAN, PAN, LAN)

·         Modern and innovative fields of implementation of sensor networks.

 

The course consists of six (6) sessions:

 

1

4 x 2-hours

Introduction – Types of Sensors

 

In the introduction the basic components of sensors and sensors’ systems are presented. The types of sensors according to the measured physical quantity, as well as the general functionalities of each type, are dealt with. Finally this section also deals with “classical” approximations of their implementation.

2

6 x 2- hours

Micromechanics – New technologies of technical implementation

 

In the second section novel implementation methods of Micromechanical sensor structures are presented. Furthermore, the advantages of those techniques versus the classical methods of implementation are analyzed according to the validity, the size, the cost and the capability of their implementation into new and innovative fields.

3

4 x 2-hours

Sensor signal conditioning, calibration and readout

 

 

The third section analyzes the signal conditioning, the calibration circuits and methods, as well as analog to digital conversion systems. 

 

4

6x 2-hours

Wired sensor networks, data transmission and software of data acquisition and data analysis

 

 

 

The fourth section analyzes: a) the basic data digital transmission such as RS-232, SPI, I2C, ΙΕΕΕ-488 and their hardware and software implementation b) industrial wired nets of sensors such as RS-485, Ethernet, FieldBus and c) data acquisition and data analysis software such as LabView.

5

2x 2-hours

Wireless Sensor Networks

 

 

The fifth section presents and analyzes the following topics: a) implementation of Wireless sensors’ networks b) their physical layer c) the transmission protocols d) advanced topics such as the management of network energy, the re-distribution of data, its dynamical re-implementation etc.

 

6

 

4x 2-hours

Wireless Sensor Networks implementation

 

 

Finally, the last section presents the fields of wireless sensor network implementation and the horizons that they open with emphasis on research and development projects.

 

In parallel to the theoretical course and within the framework of laboratory exercises and projects, students are familiarized with the procedure of Measurement-Calibration and Data acquisition from various sensors (i.e. thermal, optical, pressure, location, radiation etc). Furthermore, laboratory exercises for the development, functionality and management of wireless sensor networks are given. A visit is organized to a laboratory or industry that designs, constructs and/or calibrates sensors.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Students are evaluated on the basis of both written and oral examinations, including personal reports and homework assignments on the work done in their practice / lab session. 

• Homework assignments / project reports (30%)

• Oral grade (practice / lab) (20%) 

• Final written exam (50%) 

Recommended or required Bibliography

-Recommended Books:

1. Sabrie Soloman, “Sensors Handbook”, McGraw-Hill, 1998. ISBN10: 0070596301, ISBN13: 9780070596306

2. Pavel Ripka, Alois Tipek, “Modern Sensors”, ISTE, 2007. ISBN10: 1905209665, ISBN13: 9781905209668

3. C.S. Raghavendra, Krishna M. Sivalingam, Taieb Znati, “Wireless Sensor Networks”, Springer-Verlag, 2004. ISBN10: 1402078838, ISBN13: 9781402078835

4. Imad Mahgoub, Mohammad Ilyas, “Sensor Network Protocols”, Taylor & Francis Inc, 2006. ISBN10: 0849370361, ISBN13: 9780849370366

5. Yueh-Min Ray Huang, “Sensors”, Springer-Verlag, 2008. ISBN10: 3540690301, ISBN13: 9783540690306

-Relevant Journals:

1. IEEE Sensors Journal

2. Elsevier Sensors and Actuators A: Physical

3. Elsevier Sensors and Actuators B: Chemical

4. Elsevier Sensing and Bio-Sensing Research

5. IEEE Transactions on Wireless Communications

6. ACM Transactions on Sensor Networks

TECHNOLOGY AND SOCIETY

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Face to face lectures in class
Weekly Hours:  Lectures: 2
ECTS:  3
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course, the students possess advanced knowledge, skills and competences that enable them to:

1. Know and understand, be able to outline and explain the historical evolution of the relationship between technology and society.

2. Analyze the dynamic interaction between these two poles and to forecast the consequences in the future.

3. Examine the formation of the relationship between technology and society under the status of the new conditions which may appear in the future.

4. Define their position and their actions as engineers concerning the integration of their activities in the society.

Module Description

Lectures:

1. Introduction

2. Definitions of Creation, Technique, Technology and Society and their basic characteristics.

3. Analysis of their bidirectional relationships.

4. Historical flashback.

5. Mechanisms of technological development and determinism of the technology.

6. Socially inspired technological development.

7. Technologically supported social development.

8. Work and technology: relationships and impacts.

9. Economy and politics: interactions with the technology.

10. Education: prerequisite and result of social developments

11. Technophobia and technocracy.

12. Nature and environment: Competition and synergies to the technological and social framework

13. Globalization: Factor of re-specification of the relationships between technology and society 

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Students will be assessed in this course based on 

• an oral grade based on participation in class and homework assignments / project reports (30%)

• the midterm written test (35%) 

• the final written test (35%)

Recommended or required Bibliography

-Recommended Books

1. Bridgstock, Burch, Forge, Laurent, Lowe, Science, Technology and Society, an Introduction, Cambridge University Press (March 28, 1998), Online ISBN: 9780511620034.

2. François Russo, Introduction à l' Histoire des Techniques, Revue d' histoire des sciences, Année 1988, Vol. 41, Nr. 1, pp. 87-92.

3. Cutcliffe T., Mitcham C., Visions of STS, Counterpoints in Science, technology and society studies, 2001, Albany, NY, USA, State University of New York Press.

-Recommended Books (only in greek)

1. Αγραφιώτης Δημοσθένης, Επιστήμη Τεχνολογία Κοινωνία, Σχήματα Ανάλυσης και Εφαρμογές, Εκδ. Ελληνικά Γράμματα, Αθήνα.

2. Καϊμάκη Βάλια, Τεχνολογία και Κοινωνία, Αυτοέκδοση, Ελεύθερη πρόσβαση στο URL: http://valiakaimaki.gr/ . 

-Useful links 

1. http://www.journals.elsevier.com/technology-in-society/

2. http://sts.sagepub.com/

3. http://ieeessit.org/technology_and_society/

3rd Semester

GREEN AND ENERGY-AWARE ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Face to face lectures in class
Weekly Hours:  Lectures: 4
ECTS:  6
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course, the students possess advanced knowledge, skills and competences that enable them to:

1. Know, understand and be able to analyze the processes of design, construction and assembly of modern electronic devices and systems as well as the inevitable trade-offs among involved quantities,

2. Know, understand and be able to analyze the complete life cycle of materials and devices used in modern electronic technologies, both from a technical and from an economic aspect,

3. Discriminate and comparatively assess critical factors and quantities in life cycle and recycling of electronic materials and products,

4. Make decisions under hypothetic yet realistic scenarios of design and production of modern electronic devices and end products, and at the same time assess the impact of their decisions on the environment and on public health,

5. Understand and evaluate the impact of present and future public policies on materials and environment on the further development of technology and production,

6. Understand the interdisciplinary nature of environmentally sensitive technological development and collaborate with scientists and technologists of related fields towards a comprehensive problem handling.

Module Description

Lectures:

UNIT Ι: Introduction – Green Electronics.

Brief introduction. Industrial Ecology. Industrial Engineering. Selection of materials and adoption of procedures.

UNIT ΙΙ: Industrial production of electronics and sustainable development.

Design and development steps in an industrial unit that manufactures electronic products, focusing on sustainable development.

UNIT ΙΙΙ: Design, development and production models. 

Models and standards for processes of design, development and production of electronic components, devices and end products / appliances.

UNIT IV: Low-power design in the micro-scale. 

Low-power electronics design. Power reduction methods in CMOS design. Low-power Integrated Circuits design.

UNIT V: Low-power design in the devices scale. 

Low-power processors design. Contemporary technologies and trends.

UNIT VI: Low-power design in the end products scale.

Energy autonomous systems. Intelligent metering and alarm systems. Biomedical applications based on low-power technologies.

UNIT VII: Alternative methods for design, development/ production and toxicity.

The toxicity as a metric for alternative methods of design, development and production and its impact on public health.

UNIT VIII: Life cycle of materials and products – End of life and recycling.

The notion of life cycle. Analysis of life cycle for materials and products. Recycling procedures and cost/profit analysis.

UNIT IX: Environmental legislation and decision making – Impact on public health.

Overview of the environmental legislation at the National / European / International level. Major research studies that document the impact of material and procedure selection on public health.

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final course grade = 

10% x Class participation + 

40% x (Group) Project Report + 

50% x Final written exam.

Expected participation in learning activities: 

Students are expected to 

1. participate in all lectures and other learning activities planned for the specific semester (site visits or invited talks),

2. complete a project on a topic assigned by the instructor and related to the course contents, either independently or in groups, and submit a technical report on the results by the end of the semester,

3. prepare for and sit in the final written exam of the course. The exam covers all taught material. Students must prove mastery of the material through stating and interpreting definitions of all quantities, handling relations among quantities and assessing and interpreting tables and numerical data.

 

Recommended or required Bibliography

-Recommended Books:

1. Jan Rabaey, “Low Power Design Essentials,” Springer – Circuits and Systems, 2009, ISBN 978-0-387-71713-5,

2. Sammy G. Shina, “Green Electronics Design and Manufacturing,” McGraw-Hill, 2008, ISBN 0-07-164267-6 (e-book)

3. Lee H. Goldberg and Wendy Middleton, Eds., “Green Electronics / Green Bottom Line Environmentally responsible engineering,” SCIENCE DIRECT, ISBN: 978-0-7506-9993-8

4. John X. Wang, “Green Electronics Manufacturing,” CRC-Press, Francis & Taylor, 2013, ISBN 978-1-4398-2669-0 (e-book).

5. Greenpeace / Will Rose, “Green gadgets: designing the future. The path to greener electronics”, September 2014.

6. Directive 2012/19/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 4 July 2012 on waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE).

7. Green Electronics Council webpage http://greenelectronicscouncil.org/

8. EPEAT webpage http://www.epeat.net/about-epeat/

 

-Relevant Journals:

1. Elsevier, Sustainable Computing

2. Electronic Green Journal

3. Challengers – Special Issue on "Electronic Waste — Impact, Policy and Green Design" (2016)

4. Chemical Society Reviews – “Green Electronics” review article (2013)

5. Materials Research Society (MRS) Proceeding

6. IEEE Transactions on VLSI

7. IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems, I & ΙΙ

ELECTRIC POWER MANAGEMENT AND SMART GRIDS

Module Description

Full Module Description:
Mode of Delivery:  Face to face lectures in class
Weekly Hours:  Lectures: 4
ECTS:  6
Web Page:
Moodle Page:

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course, the students possess advanced knowledge, skills and competences that enable them to:

1. Know, list and classify the basic terms of a Power System Grid; explain the importance and objectives of the various dispersed generation units as well as that of the various energy management policies; distinguish them according to their priorities;

2. Know, name, describe and classify the modern and innovative application fields of dispersed generation units; discuss relative merits;

3. Know, describe by drawing a block diagram and explain the operation of the basic part of a smart grid (namely the Microgrid); quantify its operational, financial and environmental advantages using charts;

4. Know, understand and explain the concept of a smart grid; identify the telecommunication infrastructure needed for its operation; identify and classify smart metering devices of various technologies and discuss their relative merits;

5. Understand, explain and assess factors in Power Systems organization in the context of liberated electricity markets; carry out a case study based on technical-economical factors to discuss pros and cons of grid deployment and exploitation;

6. Collaborate in a team to carry out the above tasks.

Module Description

Contents

This course presents modern issues regarding electric energy management produced by dispersed generation units such as renewable energy sources. The coordinated control of dispersed generation units, which constitutes a Microgrid, is a basic part of a smart grid and is thoroughly studied in terms of its operational, economical and environmental advantages. Finally the basic issues of smart grids with emphasis on smart meters and telecommunication infrastructures demanded for its construction are analyzed. 

Lectures:

Unit I

The Power System: An overview

• Introduction: Basic Principles

• Electric Industry Structure

• Modern Power System: Generation-Transmission-Distribution-Loads

• Reliability, Protection and Control of Power Systems

• Stability and Power Load Flow Analysis

• The system of SCADA: Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition

• Power System and Liberalization Market

• Environmental Policies in Power System

Unit II

Distributed Energy Resources (DER Technologies)

• Modern Power Systems and Technologies of Distributed Generation

• Renewable Energy Sources (RES)

o Small scale hydro generation

o Wind power plants

o Offshore wind energy

o Solar photovoltaic generation

o Examples of integrating RES applications in the grid through power electronics

• Microturbines

• Fuel Cell

• Electric Vehicles

• Storage Systems

Unit III

Penetration of DGs Units in Power Systems

• Integration of DGs Units in Distribution Network

• Modern Power Electronics for DGs Applications – Examples

• Technical restrictions and prerequisites. Existing analysis methodologies

• Protection of  DGs

• Economics of DGs – Legal, Pricing and Financing framework for DG units

• Active Power Network - Microgrids  

Unit IV

Microgrids as a basic Part of Smart Grids

• Introduction to Microgrids

• Operational Framework of Microgrids

o Distribution Management System (DMS)

o Microgrid System Central Controller (MGCC)

o Local Controllers (LC)

• Economic, environmental and operational benefits of Microgrids in a distribution network

• Demand Response Management in Microgrids

• Business Models and Pricing Mechanism in Microgrids

• Microgrids and Smart Grids

Unit V

Smart Grids

• Introduction to Smart Grids (SG)

• Factors affecting the growth of SG

• The global reality in the field of smart grids and transition into future grids

• Smart Agents

• Electronics and communications infrastructure in SG

• ICT Technologies

• The need of using smart meters 

o description and definition of metering infrastructures

o metering equipment

o communication of metering equipment

o communication protocols

o Metering Data Management Systems (MDMS)

• Application of SGs in Europe

• Interconnections issues between SGs

Assessment Methods and Criteria

Final course grade = 

10% x Class participation

40% x (Group) Project Report

50% x Final written exam.

Expected participation in learning activities:

Students are expected to:

1. participate in all lectures and other learning activities planned for the specific semester (site visits or invited talks),

2. complete a project on a topic assigned by the instructor and related to the course contents, either independently or in groups, and submit a technical report on the results by the end of the semester,

3. prepare for and sit in the final written exam of the course. The exam covers all taught material. Students must prove mastery of the material through stating and interpreting definitions of all quantities, handling relations among quantities and assessing and interpreting tables and numerical data.

Recommended or required Bibliography

-Recommended Books:

1. Jan Rabaey, “Low Power Design Essentials,” Springer – Circuits and Systems, 2009, ISBN 978-0-387-71713-5,

2. Sammy G. Shina, “Green Electronics Design and Manufacturing,” McGraw-Hill, 2008, ISBN 0-07-164267-6 (e-book)

3. Lee H. Goldberg and Wendy Middleton, Eds., “Green Electronics / Green Bottom Line Environmentally responsible engineering,” SCIENCE DIRECT, ISBN: 978-0-7506-9993-8

4. John X. Wang, “Green Electronics Manufacturing,” CRC-Press, Francis & Taylor, 2013, ISBN 978-1-4398-2669-0 (e-book).

5. Greenpeace / Will Rose, “Green gadgets: designing the future. The path to greener electronics”, September 2014.

6. Directive 2012/19/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 4 July 2012 on waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE).

7. N. Hatziargyriou, “Microgrids: Architectures and Control”, Wiley-IEEE Press, 1st Edition, 2014.